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BARRONVC's Photo BARRONVC Posts: 1,878
1/12/12 2:41 P

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ELLIEQUEEN

These issues have caused me to evaluate everything I do. In my workplace I have special tables that adjust to my position, ergonomics. I had to evaluate my cycling position to accommodate my issues and keep correct spinal alignment.

I have exercises. They don't look like much but if you do them correctly, wow! Then flexibility, it's huge. I'm still learning and adapting.

You re thinking. I have PDF's of my exercises and spreadsheets for exercises and setting up 6 week programs. It must be good, my PT wanted a copy and is using them at the clinic.
Inbox me if you want info.

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1/12/12 2:35 P

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Thanks for all the tips on core, stability, flexibility, etc. with regard to lumbar "issues". I have already kicked myself into a higher gear in the past month, going to the gym right after work instead of "hoping" I'll get up early enough to work out at home in the morning. Doing stationary bike for a good sweat 3-4 days a week, but also putting in time with weights, machines, and "on the floor for core ", etc.... Have to think about more stretching, I guess.
Any particular favorite exercises ?

BARRONVC's Photo BARRONVC Posts: 1,878
1/12/12 1:00 P

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I have a strict set of exercises that I must follow to avoid a complete lumbar fusion. My spine sucks but you would never know it by watching me at the gym, work, or on a bike.

The core, balance, muscle firing, strength, and flexibility is the key. Not just one, all, and you need to be balanced. At times I hate doing the stretching or certain strength work, but I must attack those areas.

I needed a wake up call and didn't do enough stretching the past few weeks. Too much aerobics and strength training, not enough stretching. Ya, back on it. Your body will tell you a few days late so listen and react fast or you get shut down.

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DDOORN's Photo DDOORN Posts: 23,649
1/12/12 12:48 P

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Ab / core work is critical to minimize & deal with back troubles.

Don

Co-Team Leader for All Health Pros, Binghamton Area Losers & Laid Off But Staying Strong SparkTeams

Don't die with your music still in you. -- Dr. Wayne Dyer

"We either make ourselves miserable or we make ourselves strong. The amount of work is the same." --- Carlos Castaneda

"You yourself, as much as anybody in the entire universe, deserve your love and affection." --- Buddha

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BARRONVC's Photo BARRONVC Posts: 1,878
1/11/12 7:01 P

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ELLIEQUEEN want to more about lumbar issues? Contact me. Probably best to spare the others any details. I will tell you that nothing is impossible, it takes time and paying attention to your body. I tried everything, bike, recumbent, stems, shoes, bars, pedals, took an leg boot and machined it for cycling cleats. I can tell you what I found to work for me.

I had lumbar surgery on L4, May 2010, Fused C5-7 3-2007, new hip 11-2008.

"Now I'm wanting to ride for a week across Kansas in June, but next week will be seeing the spine-guy.... "

You may want to look at rehab. I used a Spine Care clinic, it has all disciplines. From acupuncture, to chiropractics, injections, rehab, PT, OT, work hardening, Pain management, tens, and the neurosurgeons. You work with a team. I'm happy with the results. This is not the 1st person I went to, I had to shop around for the right fit.

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1/11/12 1:16 P

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Barron -- You've had luombar surgeries, and obviously are still pedaling! Thanks for mentioning that. I'm going for an eval of some lower lumbar stenosis and disc "issues", and as much as I want this thing FIXED, I'm also reluctant to be told anything might stop my riding. I've already given up jogging because of knee stuff, so have been trying really hard to "morph" into a bicyclist. Now I'm wanting to ride for a week across Kansas in June, but next week will be seeing the spine-guy.... Wish me luck!

BARRONVC's Photo BARRONVC Posts: 1,878
1/11/12 1:32 A

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I've had a replacement, numerous spinal fusions and lumbar surgery. Clip-less pedals are just fine.

Most important is your riding position, vargus/valgus, cleat position, fore/aft, seat height, and to make sure the line of force is good.

If possible find a trainer. Fixture your bike in and do 15 - 20 revolutions with one legs, keep it going and clip in with the others, unclip opposite and repeat 10 times. Ride 5 more minutes and 10 more times. Next find a church or school parking lot. Practice stopping at parking lines and clipping out. Start up and clip back in. If you do it enough in a safe environment your learning curve will be fast.


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1/11/12 1:04 A

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I got the whole shoes-n-pedals going a few months ago although I was frankly a little intimidated by the whole thing. I had had a knee replacement in March, and really wanted to get the most out of that by having a "correct" pedal stroke- efficient, etc. It didn't help that my local bike guy cheerfully assured me that falling several times was practically inevitable. I have practiced over and over at a standstill, using one hand on a car or fence to balance myself. I have practiced by riding out into the country and making myself clip out and clip in again 2-3 times where there's nothing to hold on to. And guess what --- I still haven't fallen over! I've come close, and prepared myself (quickly!) to bite the dust, but it hasn't happened.
The plus ?? I can keep my cadence faster with less effort, and I'm getting more bang for my buck in terms of covering distance and burning calories at a higher rate. I don't live by these numbers, but I do enjoy competing against myself to some extent.

By the way, I'm 62 and overweight -- so, combined with the brand new knee replacement, I think I'm a fairly "high risk" rider. So let me say simply that I'm glad I have taken the risk, and I invite anybody else on the fence to go ahead and jump!

TUCSONJILL's Photo TUCSONJILL Posts: 274
10/12/11 2:06 P

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What a difference! I just got back from my first ride with my own set of clipless pedals/shoes. I'm a pretty modest rider, but where I really noticed the difference was on the hillier bits of my ride. It really felt like I was getting more out of my efforts. Gotta love that! I'm thinking I might be a teeny bit sore tomorrow from the difference in pedaling stroke, with more "pull" on the upstroke for each leg, but it doesn't seem like it'll be bad--and definitely a price I'm willing to pay!

I have never finished a workout and thought to myself, "Now, THAT was a waste of time!"


"You are never given a wish without also being given the power to make it true. You may have to work for it, however." Richard Bach, Illusions


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CHICKYSOUP's Photo CHICKYSOUP Posts: 273
9/13/11 3:53 P

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I felt there was a huge difference once I upgraded to clipless pedals. There is a speed difference, but less wear on the body, because you can really pull through the whole pedal stroke. I did a metric century (my first) not long after I got the new pedals but a few days before the ride, injured or stressed the bottom of my foot. It hurt to walk but I was going to do that ride even if it put me on crutches! Low and behold, I didn't feel any pain or strain on my foot at all, because the pedals and shoes stabilized my foot.

Once you get used to it, not being clipped into a bike feels so strange and dangerous. I have a hard time riding my hybrid for trips around town for this reason.

Lastly, a good LBS should put your bike on a trainer and let you practice clipping in. There's no rule that says you can't unclip 15 feet before a stop and you will still be able to pedal a bit, unclipped. Good luck!

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BARRONVC's Photo BARRONVC Posts: 1,878
9/5/11 12:16 P

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Don,

I'm about the same age as you. I've been riding cleats with toe clips since the 60's and clip-less since the early 90's.

The clip-less system I have saves me. It keeps me in alignment and after a really hard effort I can walk the next day.

If you ever want in depth information just inbox me.

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DDOORN's Photo DDOORN Posts: 23,649
9/4/11 9:30 P

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Sorry so long in getting back on this...been traveling w/ limited SparkTime...but I DO appreciate hearing about the other benefits beyond speed and will definitely keep this on my list of things to tackle in the future.

Thx for enlightening me!

Don

Co-Team Leader for All Health Pros, Binghamton Area Losers & Laid Off But Staying Strong SparkTeams

Don't die with your music still in you. -- Dr. Wayne Dyer

"We either make ourselves miserable or we make ourselves strong. The amount of work is the same." --- Carlos Castaneda

"You yourself, as much as anybody in the entire universe, deserve your love and affection." --- Buddha

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JHOLLNAGEL Posts: 1,768
8/31/11 4:15 P

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Barronvc

Touche

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BARRONVC's Photo BARRONVC Posts: 1,878
8/31/11 3:59 P

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Forget about the speed difference. What about less wear and tear on your body? Cleats set up correctly will keep your line of force in check. That speed comes from efficiency and body mechanics. Poor body mechanics will wear out your knees, hips, ankles and the possibility of an overuse injury is much greater.

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DDOORN's Photo DDOORN Posts: 23,649
8/31/11 3:47 P

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Hmm...have to keep all your tips in mind, but still gotta say, for another 2-3 mph difference I'm not necessarily "sold"...lol!

Don

Co-Team Leader for All Health Pros, Binghamton Area Losers & Laid Off But Staying Strong SparkTeams

Don't die with your music still in you. -- Dr. Wayne Dyer

"We either make ourselves miserable or we make ourselves strong. The amount of work is the same." --- Carlos Castaneda

"You yourself, as much as anybody in the entire universe, deserve your love and affection." --- Buddha

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JHOLLNAGEL Posts: 1,768
8/31/11 3:35 P

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I know when I switched my pedal stroke was more efficient and form was better. I also noticed a 2-3 mph faster for speed as well.

I am to the point where I do a modified track stand start/stop before I unclip.

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BARRONVC's Photo BARRONVC Posts: 1,878
8/31/11 1:48 P

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Don,

Come to WI. I'll put some SPD's on your bike and give you 30 min in the parking lot clipping in and out, then we will take a ride down the bike trail doing ILT's (individual leg training) clipping one foot out for 25 - 30 revolutions and the other repeating and working on making smooth circles and transition. You won't crash. It's just being mindful, having the proper foot/cleat position and adjustment on the pedals.

It's not a big deal to learn this. The efficiency, alignment, and correct anatomical movement of the foot, ankle, knee and hip will extend your cycling life.

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TOPAHI's Photo TOPAHI SparkPoints: (14,026)
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8/31/11 1:32 P

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Remember when you first learned to ride a bike... it might have been a little intimidating... you probably fell over... but once you got the hang of it... it was easy.

It's sort of the same thing with clipless pedals.

All that being said... no one should "convince" you to go to clipless pedals.
It doesn't make you any less of a cyclist not to ride them.
You don't "need" them to ride a bike, and you don't "need" them to ride a bike fast.

Also, in my opinion, it's the new riders who ride on the road that have the biggest issue with getting out of the pedals quickly in an unexpected situation.
I think this is due to a lack of repetition.
When riding off-road you have to get in and out of the pedals quickly all the time.
If you are on the road you may have to stop only a few times in a very planned deliberate way (for stop signs and lights etc).







Edited by: TOPAHI at: 8/31/2011 (13:41)
Tom

Riding a bike is FUN!
The treadmill is NOT!

Never argue with idiots... They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.


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LADYGWEN25's Photo LADYGWEN25 SparkPoints: (87,262)
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8/31/11 12:52 P

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ok those are good points for them... but like Don.. i am STILL so wary of them..lol..

Gwen

“Courage is not the absence of fear, but rather the judgment that something else is more important than fear.



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TOPAHI's Photo TOPAHI SparkPoints: (14,026)
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8/31/11 11:11 A

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Don...

Going with the clipless pedals makes riding the bike "easier" (that is a really simplified term).
In my opinion they do make a big difference in how efficiently you can ride the bike.

A lot of people are intimidated by the thought of being attached to the bike when actually it's really not that big of a deal.

The mountain bike systems are easier to get in and out of.
I found the Crank Brothers, Egg Beaters to be the easiest.
The shoes I use are as comfortable as tennis shoes and allow me to walk around as usual off the bike.

Yes... You might fall over when you first learn how to use the system.
Most people fall over when coming to a stop, so other than being embarrassing, it's not really what I would call dangerous.

I do most of my riding by myself and I'm never in a group.
Other than trying to go faster because it's fun... I don't try to better (or track) my time on a specific route.
I even use clipless pedals on my bike set up for pulling a trailer.

Give them a try... I think you'll like them.


Edited by: TOPAHI at: 8/31/2011 (11:20)
Tom

Riding a bike is FUN!
The treadmill is NOT!

Never argue with idiots... They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.


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DDOORN's Photo DDOORN Posts: 23,649
8/31/11 8:54 A

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Question from someone who continues to be intimidated by the whole clipping deal:

Is the improvement in one's cycling THAT significant when clipping as opposed to NOT?

While I appreciate whizzing along as much as the next person, I am not a racer and I do not pay a whole lot of attention to numbers when it comes to cycling. I.E. if I've done a certain route in a certain time frame I'm not going to scrutinize my time the NEXT time to be sure I've shaved off a few minutes.

Given all of that, I have thus far just figured it's not worth the grief for this 54-year-old klutz to attempt to master the art of clipping in.

Am I missing something that is all that significant...?

Just curious for feedback...

Don

Co-Team Leader for All Health Pros, Binghamton Area Losers & Laid Off But Staying Strong SparkTeams

Don't die with your music still in you. -- Dr. Wayne Dyer

"We either make ourselves miserable or we make ourselves strong. The amount of work is the same." --- Carlos Castaneda

"You yourself, as much as anybody in the entire universe, deserve your love and affection." --- Buddha

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LADYGWEN25's Photo LADYGWEN25 SparkPoints: (87,262)
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8/30/11 3:12 P

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thanks Barron.. I really appreciate the honest advice. I'm a girl who likes peopel that are direct and to the point. emoticon at this point i've been working with a chiro since March for my hip and leng length issue.. the full lift across seems to be doing the job across the board: running and cycling. So i think i'm goign to stick with that for now. After reading your last post..i really don't want to mess with the crank arms.. because if my bike were to break.. i think i'd seriously cry..lol.. it's my BABY! Speaking of.. i need to get ready.. off for a ride!!! :)

Gwen

“Courage is not the absence of fear, but rather the judgment that something else is more important than fear.



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BARRONVC's Photo BARRONVC Posts: 1,878
8/30/11 12:36 P

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Don't lengthen or shorten a crank arm. It is dangerous. If the difference is in your hips and not the actual leg length you can split the difference. I know I had a hip replacement and went through all this with the best fitters and PT.

At this point take a step back. Try to understand the mechanics, there are many ways to overcome these issues. 1/2" = about 12+mm, that would be a shim of about 6mm or .236 between your cleat and shoe. Until you have a true professional look at this you could be causing damage to yourself. Go carefully, take the changes in steps so your body can adapt.

You can't make a crank arm longer with standard cranks. You could drill and tap one to be shorter but it might cause the crank arm to break under extreme load, these are usually heat treated and machining could remove/add temper and machining skill is needed. Bottom line you would have to remove about 20mm from the length to drill and tap the crank arm and that's too much. I own a machine shop and have made adjustable crank arms, prototypes for sizing cycles and you are looking at a lot of money. I have made eccentrics that will get you +/- about 2 mm. High Sierra Cycle Center, Inc.. makes adjustable length at $550.00 a set. Then you have to pay someone to adjust them for you, that will cost $200 to $400 from a top fitter/PT. If you don't use a professional you can mess yourself up, the process will take a number of adjustments and time to dial everything in. There are other adjustable cranks out there but they are not 100% adjustable, they usually go in 5mm or 2.5mm adjustments.

At this point professional advice is needed. What I'm telling you is just from experience I have had. I'm not a professional fitter or don't have a PhD in physical therapy. I know I don't know it. All I can provide is some direction and tell you what not to do. Personally 1/2" in the hip is not all that bad, maybe this can be helped with Chiropractics or stretching. I had a 12mm difference before the hip replacement, now it pretty close. I have orthos. Before the new hip I had about 5mm of shims and cleat fore/aft a little different. This was all tuned in professionally with a top fitter.

Edited by: BARRONVC at: 8/30/2011 (13:27)
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LADYGWEN25's Photo LADYGWEN25 SparkPoints: (87,262)
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8/30/11 8:41 A

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@strapped.. I would need the right crank arm lengthened.. I wonder how difficult that would be.. and i'm leary to modify the bike like that should i ever want to sell it in the future as i upgrade... because how would i possible find someone with a 1/2" short right leg like me??? lol

Gwen

“Courage is not the absence of fear, but rather the judgment that something else is more important than fear.



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MICHELE5551's Photo MICHELE5551 SparkPoints: (29,127)
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8/29/11 10:00 P

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Progress update - I am still working at getting the hang of clipping in and out, but I have made big improvements. I bought Shimano single entry SPD pedals with Bontrager road shoes (not sure if that is what is meant by the system). The LBS did adjust them to a low tension. I parked myself in my driveway and just practiced clipping in and clipping out over and over and over again until I could do it without looking. Then I practiced up and down my quiet street with many starts & stops (I'm sure the neighbors think I am crazy). Tonight I felt more confident and rode about one mile. The class BARRONVC mentioned sounds interesting. I will have to check into that. Last year I went to a class on handling basic emergencies (flat tires, broken spokes, etc) at my LBS. it was great!

Thanks again for the advice!
Thanks again everyone.

-Michele

"Your body is your home. If you don't take care of it, where will you live?" -unknown


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STRAPPED_182's Photo STRAPPED_182 Posts: 213
8/29/11 9:43 P

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The left crank arm on the bike is easily replaced, and could be shortened or lenghtened with ease.

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LADYGWEN25's Photo LADYGWEN25 SparkPoints: (87,262)
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8/29/11 3:15 P

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It's in the hips..right hip is 1/2 inch higher.. I have a full shim on my sneaker.. and a removeable 1/2 shim for all my other shoes... i find the full shim works best with biking.. so no matter what position my foot takes i'm not hurting myself. I did try the partial shim for awhile.. but it was still injuring my IT band. the gentleman that fitted me for my Trek was very good. said he could even modify the shaft on the right side if i really needed it to. he and i have been working together since i got my new road bike to make adjustments as i need them without charging me.. which is good. He also knows of my goals for a Half Ironman next year and a full Ironman year after...they've never steared me wrong..so i'm comfortable with them.. One of my triclubs friends recommend a runnign and tri store about an hour away.. they do bike fittings aon this weird modified bike... other than the measurements the guy at the LBS did for me.. what more can they really do?? I gotta say.. I wasn't impressed no comfortable the the people at the runnign and triclub store.. felt like i was just another quick buck for them... my LBS... yupper.. feels like they'll bend over backwards to help. and i'm lucky i actually have 2 LBS in town.. I just prefer the one the 1/2mile up the road.. AWESOME customer service.

AS a side note.. I do notice the leg difference while running too.. I've tried running again in my old sneaks which have no insert.. yeah the IT band will pull..As my chiro put it.. there is enough of a differnce that without the shoe insert my left leg is always working OT.. and it's been smaller my entire life... SO i wear the inserts.

So i will check out the Vargus and Valgus. check out ortho inserts for the bike shoes.. WIll that work with the clipins??

Gwen

“Courage is not the absence of fear, but rather the judgment that something else is more important than fear.



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BARRONVC's Photo BARRONVC Posts: 1,878
8/29/11 11:34 A

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This is really a sensitive situation. I've dealt with it and for each it's different.

You must be dynamically fitted on the bike by a really aware and experienced fitter.

There are way to make up for the leg length. Where is the difference, in the lower leg, femur, or at the hips? How about your foot size. Often you would use 1/2 the discrepancy for a shim but it depends were the issue is. You can move a foot fore/aft. There are wedges for Vargus and Valgus issues. You can get cycling orthos with the full length shim. Before you do anything you need to know the facts and be checked for the following.

1. Vargus, Valgus
2. Where is the length issue, running and cycling are different
3. Position and how the length issue impacts dynamic movement
4. Choice to correct, shim, shoe, position, orthos and how much you can afford
5. Try the new position and just be aware you may need fine tuning.



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LADYGWEN25's Photo LADYGWEN25 SparkPoints: (87,262)
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8/29/11 9:46 A

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ok now i have a ? about bike shoes... which will eventually get me thinking about the clipin shoes... My right leg is almost a full 1/2 inch shorter than my left.. I have in my running shoes a full lift across it to keep me from both mashing down on the pedal when i ride my bike as well as when i run.. When i went to a sports medicine chiro after severely pulling my IT band in march.. this was discovered post Xrays..i did my first triatholon using my running shoes for the bike.. and hey..made for an easier T2 transistion when all ihad to do was dismount and rack bieka nd take off helmut.

Ok my question.. I would like to eventually get bike shoes for when i'm doing my 1/2 century rides and century rides.. talked to me LBS where i go for all my bikes and stuff.. they mentioned they could put in a lift for me or "shim it" as they said..Now my cobbler is the one who does my lifts for my running and daily wear shoes. wasn't sure a bike shop could do thatr to a shoe.. my only other alternative is to get a slightly longer baron the right hand side so when i'm pedaling i'm not mashing. So what are your thoughts? lift int he bike shoe or longer bar?

Gwen

“Courage is not the absence of fear, but rather the judgment that something else is more important than fear.



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BILL60's Photo BILL60 Posts: 258,031
8/29/11 7:07 A

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I echo Barron's earlier comments. Go back to your LBS and get on a trainer and practice clipping and unclipping. Good luck.

"Excellence is but for the few."


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GIANT-STEPS SparkPoints: (65,379)
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8/28/11 11:37 P

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LBS=:Local Bicycle Shop.

One of the most bizarre on-line bicycle abbreviations I've seen for years before someone finally explained it to me:

TIOOYN

There Is Only One You Know. Usually a reference to the Tour de France though occasionally a highly esteemed cyclist will be graced with this.

LADYGWEN25's Photo LADYGWEN25 SparkPoints: (87,262)
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8/28/11 10:31 P

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Barron..what;s a LBS?

and i'm a triathelete.. was a cyclist before a runner.. but i love them both :) I'm pretty anal about following traffic laws and try to educate cyclists as well as drivers. Where's a good link for traffic laws for cyclists?

Gwen

“Courage is not the absence of fear, but rather the judgment that something else is more important than fear.



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BARRONVC's Photo BARRONVC Posts: 1,878
8/28/11 8:57 P

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The class was done through the local bike clubs. Search the net and you might find a certified teach in your area.

In 2011 the big thing is Tri's. Most of these people are runners and just grab a bike without knowing how to handle it. Often they are very fit and able to go faster than there handling abilities.

Ask a LBS to get with the program. Call local media and law enforcement to promote safety. We had a few deaths and one of the LBS put up a billboard with the laws. Motorists aren't aware of the rights of cyclists. These laws have changed a lot in the past year and even cyclists are not up to speed. One LBS was passing laws from 2008 and they are much different now.

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LADYGWEN25's Photo LADYGWEN25 SparkPoints: (87,262)
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8/28/11 7:14 P

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barronvc...other than out local bike group.. what would be the best way to find a class like that??

Gwen

“Courage is not the absence of fear, but rather the judgment that something else is more important than fear.



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MICHELE5551's Photo MICHELE5551 SparkPoints: (29,127)
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8/28/11 2:29 P

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Thank you everyone for the good advice!

-Michele

"Your body is your home. If you don't take care of it, where will you live?" -unknown


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BARRONVC's Photo BARRONVC Posts: 1,878
8/28/11 11:39 A

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We have a class we do for this. It involves a parking lot, parking cones, and obstacles. At first people wobble and sometimes tip over. After 2 sessions of teaching and practice they learn how to negotiate stops, starts, and obstacles.

It's really fun. It seems the Tri's people end up the most as those set ups are more difficult to handle in that environment. There is a class called Effective Cycling, it was taught by League of American Wheel men. I used to teach that in the 90's, it made a huge difference. Some clubs would not let you ride with them until you took the class.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vehicular_cycl
in
g


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LADYGWEN25's Photo LADYGWEN25 SparkPoints: (87,262)
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8/28/11 10:07 A

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the clip pedals still scare me..lol.. or should i say FALLING with them..:) I've seen more than one person fall over in my interection because they didn't get them out in time.

Gwen

“Courage is not the absence of fear, but rather the judgment that something else is more important than fear.



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BARRONVC's Photo BARRONVC Posts: 1,878
8/28/11 12:52 A

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What kind of system? You are probably not grasping the technique. Go back to LBS and have them put you on a trainer and provide some instruction. They could need lubrication, adjustment, of the pedal of cleat.

After that find a parking lot. Pedal around and clip in and out. Use parking likes for a reference like a stop sign. Start and stop, that's when you usually encounter problems.

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TOPAHI's Photo TOPAHI SparkPoints: (14,026)
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8/28/11 12:47 A

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Make sure the pedals are adjusted to the lowest retention setting.
And yes... just like BEVPRESLEY said... it's practice practice practice.

Find something to hold onto (railing, lightpost, or in a doorway).
Practice clipping and un-clipping at least 25 times on each foot (more if you cant do it easily).
When you are ready... pedal in an open area and practice clipping in and out one foot at a time, again at least 25 times.
When you are comfortable with this you can hit the open road.
Make sure you are very deliberate in the beginning and give yourself plenty of time to unclip.
I just recently went though this with my wife who used this system for the first time.


Edited by: TOPAHI at: 8/28/2011 (00:49)
Tom

Riding a bike is FUN!
The treadmill is NOT!

Never argue with idiots... They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.


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BEVPRESLEY's Photo BEVPRESLEY SparkPoints: (130,357)
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8/27/11 11:27 P

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Have them checked to make sure they are not too tight. There is quite a bit of adjustment available. Then find a wall or railing to support yourself and practice, practice, practice.

beverly

One Day at a Time:
1) 10,000 steps daily
2) fruit & vegie at every meal and log
3) aerobic or strength train every day
4) 7 hours sleep daily
5) check in with SP daily

August 2014 goals:
1) Get my nutrition back under control and record daily
2) Finish the forest service quilt and wall hanging
3) Ride my bike 25 miles a week
4) Clean and de-clutter one room each week


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MICHELE5551's Photo MICHELE5551 SparkPoints: (29,127)
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I have a road bike and I just bought bike shoes with pedals. I am struggling with clipping myself in to the pedals and unclipping without falling. I have a scuffed up knee from my stopping attempts today and I am looking for advice and tips to start/stop a little smoother. Is it just practice, practice, practice? Advice?

-Michele

"Your body is your home. If you don't take care of it, where will you live?" -unknown


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