Author: Sorting Last Post on Top ↓ Message:
DDOORN's Photo DDOORN Posts: 23,912
7/8/11 6:52 A

Community Team Member

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
What a shame they don't allow for slower riders to hang together and have some fun!

Don

Co-Team Leader for All Health Pros, Binghamton Area Losers & Laid Off But Staying Strong SparkTeams

Don't die with your music still in you. -- Dr. Wayne Dyer

"We either make ourselves miserable or we make ourselves strong. The amount of work is the same." --- Carlos Castaneda

"You yourself, as much as anybody in the entire universe, deserve your love and affection." --- Buddha

rules4humans.com


 Pounds lost: 112.3 
 
0
30
60
90
120
OUTDOORSYJORDY's Photo OUTDOORSYJORDY SparkPoints: (1,634)
Fitness Minutes: (2,375)
Posts: 31
7/8/11 12:00 A

Send Private Message
Reply
I agree... I was thinking about going to a group ride in a couple of weeks.
haven't been since last year :)
I saw the boys tonight and thought... I might just see if I can hang for about ten miles.
It is a good way to get me out of my comfort zone.
BUT unfortunately I live in a really small town.
And I am just thankful that we have a cycling club in general.
There is a bigger club about 40 minutes from me... where they have an A and B ride.
And I've made some contacts to join them on a weekend ride.
But our group probably averages 20+ mph.
But I should swallow my pride and enjoy the challenge of getting dropped...
:)

 current weight: 143.0 
 
143
138.5
134
129.5
125
DDOORN's Photo DDOORN Posts: 23,912
7/7/11 5:41 P

Community Team Member

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Ditto my bike club...we grade rides A, B, C, D depending on the rough average speed which would be expected.

Don

Co-Team Leader for All Health Pros, Binghamton Area Losers & Laid Off But Staying Strong SparkTeams

Don't die with your music still in you. -- Dr. Wayne Dyer

"We either make ourselves miserable or we make ourselves strong. The amount of work is the same." --- Carlos Castaneda

"You yourself, as much as anybody in the entire universe, deserve your love and affection." --- Buddha

rules4humans.com


 Pounds lost: 112.3 
 
0
30
60
90
120
GIANT-STEPS SparkPoints: (65,379)
Fitness Minutes: (439)
Posts: 3,641
7/7/11 1:42 P

Send Private Message
Reply
There are usually more than one group of cyclists to ride with. My bike shop had rides for absolute beginners where nobody was dropped, 12 MPH was the maximum speed and everyone stopped when someone flatted or had a mechanical problem.
The next step was what we called moderate rides which had average speeds up to 16 MPH and everyone was expected to know how to ride in a group, draft, and deal with flats on their own because the group might not stop.
Then there were fast rides that averaged 20+ MPH but rode together helping maintain a high average speed and the group would not stop unless the rider would be stranded.
At the top was race training rides that were often no faster than fast rides but had sprints for every city limits sign, attacks, break-aways and blocking just like a real race. Riders instead of working together were often working against each other in ad hoc teams.

BILL60's Photo BILL60 Posts: 334,015
7/7/11 8:32 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
All great advice. I would add that there's something to being dropped on group rides. When we ride alone (I do it all the time), we some times get much too comfortable with the pace and end up going slower and slower. Group rides at times humble us into reality. So, my 2 cents: do the group rides once in a while and see how much further you last before being dropped. One of these times you're going to hang in there till the end. Good luck!!

Bill

"Excellence is but for the few."


 November Minutes: 1,482
 
0
812.5
1625
2437.5
3250
JONBOYR700 Posts: 68
7/7/11 7:00 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Try doing negative splits then until you find your ideal century speed, IE: the second half of the ride is the same or faster than the first half. Force yourself to do a slower 1st split until you get the hang of it.


OUTDOORSYJORDY's Photo OUTDOORSYJORDY SparkPoints: (1,634)
Fitness Minutes: (2,375)
Posts: 31
7/6/11 11:48 P

Send Private Message
Reply
Right now I am not doing any group rides.
Where I live it is mostly all guys.
And they all race :)
Which is awesome... but If I'm gonna get dropped... I'd rather just plan a ride on my own.
Sooo... me and a friend of mine do long rides together... but don't draft.
I appreciate the advice.
Especially the weather thing.
I need to make myself go out in the wind more often. blah.
thanks.

 current weight: 143.0 
 
143
138.5
134
129.5
125
JONBOYR700 Posts: 68
7/6/11 9:19 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Ditto on all the comments regarding nutrition and hydration on longer rides.

Assuming your mileage, terrain, and training is up to par, I think a mistake that alot of riders get sucked into is doing to many group rides which may inflate your avg MPH or give an incorrect perception to fitness due to drafting. Group rides have their place, esp. for speed workouts, but many riders I know do them all the time.

Do your long distance training rides solo or if in a group, lead the entire time or off to the side of the draft line. This will prepare you physically and mentally if you get split off from a pack so that you have the ability and confidence to make it to the finish line and 'on pace'.

Once you can solo ride long distances in ideal conditions, pick some really miserable days weather wise so that rain, wind, heat, etc won't be a factor on race day.

If you want to take the long distance rides to an extreme to build even more confidence in a non-race environment, join your state's Rando group (assuming you're in the US?). Between the distance, weather, terrain, and being completely self supported - you'll get a challenge of some kind.

In long/ultra distance rides, you have to ride your pace.

Last thing to remember, if it was easy, everyone would be doing century or longer rides :)

OUTDOORSYJORDY's Photo OUTDOORSYJORDY SparkPoints: (1,634)
Fitness Minutes: (2,375)
Posts: 31
7/5/11 4:54 P

Send Private Message
Reply
THANKS! For all the advice!
I am riding right now about 4 times a week - trying to get one long ride in on the weekends.
I'm training for some triathalons... So this also includes swimming and running on different days and two days of strength.

I think I just started off waaay too fast.
The terrain was flat.
And we where averaging around 19mph the first 40 miles and that soon was over :)
SO... I guess I will just keep working on my long rides?
And I like the advice of trying to eat "light"
and fruits.
I had looong hours of work that week.
With not a lot of sleep.
And felt I didn't get to eat alot?
before hand.

I will try the snickers at mile 70. :)
And coconut water? Sounds fun. I will try that too .
Thanks again you guys.

 current weight: 143.0 
 
143
138.5
134
129.5
125
ZOEMCMAC's Photo ZOEMCMAC Posts: 251
7/4/11 2:41 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Dr. Lim (yeah, this guy
http://www.bicycling.com/news/featured-s
tories/out-lim?page=0,2 )
has some good videos on you tube about what he has his teams eating these days (like cake of rice/egg/parma cheese) as they are easy to digests (unlike wheat) and the right mix of carbs & protein.

I found his advice about how high fruitcose corn syrup screwing up one's gut to be dead on for me. (cramping and gas). So I fuel my rides with things like Sports Beans, water, bananas and turkey & avocado sandwiches a quarter at a time. I adore Odwalla's Tropical Energy drink as well, but pace that.
I found during a 70 mile ride early on that if my blood sugar drops, my mental thing drops. I start to get blue and even question why the heck I do long rides. (it was a supported ride but the food tasted terrible to me so I didn't eat after lunch. My next big ride? Yeah Sports Beans was one of the sponsors and funny, I had such a better 80 mile ride that day!) So long ride days are NOT diet days - I have to keep my carbs up or the mental just slides. I am out there to have FUN so pass me the sports beans. They only have 100 calories for a pack, and if I am burning 600/hr then 1 pack an hour isn't totally nuts.
My Garmin Forerunner 305 is fantastic for a ball park figure for my calorie burn, and that really, I need to fuel my ride.

Also, I have to watch my heart rate. I am a sucker for a fast pace leader and will ride out at a snapper pace than I should on my old 45lb hybrid bike. It takes discipline to SLOW DOWN so you ride your pace, and not sprint and burn out early.

Hope some of this gives you ideas.


-------
past accomplishments:
- cycled 101 miles! (11/2010)
-completed "Couch to 5k" training program 5/4/2010
- 5/8/2010: Willow Glen 5k/ (3 miles): 34:13! Average pace was 11:20!!!
- 5/2/2010: Na


 Pounds lost: 23.4 
 
0
15.75
31.5
47.25
63
GIANT-STEPS SparkPoints: (65,379)
Fitness Minutes: (439)
Posts: 3,641
6/30/11 12:35 P

Send Private Message
Reply
The reason I advocate speed and power workouts early on is because I observe that riders often get on plateaus. Many of my customers who started riding would improve to the point where they achieve a certain speed (16 MPH was the most common) and then plateau. Even as they rode more they just didn't get faster. Their legs and cardio-vascular system needed to learn to work at a different level. Alternating anaerobic work and rest (intervals or fartlek) was the key to breaking the plateau and soon these riders would graduate form our medium to our fast group.
Also, I'm not a fan of spending a lot of money on cycling. Sure if you compete you will want every edge you can afford but as a recreational cyclist now I look at purchases and ask myself if they will make me enjoy cycling more and the answer almost every time is no. My bikes are 25 and 35 years old respectively. Some parts are original while others had to be upgraded because they are too obsolete to maintain. A great bike in the 1980's is still a great bike today. I was delighted when I did Team in Training that one of the other riders was still riding the bike I sold him in the mid 1980's. His bike was a $250 part CrMo sport touring bike that worked as well as any for our training rides and century.
I will admit to lusting after a power meter though.

ACTIVE_AT_60's Photo ACTIVE_AT_60 Posts: 3,039
6/30/11 6:47 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
As said previously, you don't need to ride a century to complete a century. Team in Training have gotten a lot of riders to ride centuries typically use the 80% rule as the longest ride. They slowly train people to get up there and keep in mind many of these riders are 'newbies'.

I think once you have done your first century and continue to ride, you will find the balance in your training during the week with shorter rides (you define the distance - for me it is about 25 miles three times a week and on the weekend somewhere between 50-65).

I have looked at the postings related to fuel, and I must admit I am really surprised to read what people what is consumed. I am more concerned than surprised actually. I don't mean to be offensive to anyone, but what I have read is probably the unhealthiest fueling strategies I have seen in a long time, and may actually canibalize the metabolism to the point where your weight loss and endurance is compromized.

I wish more people would get a fundamental understanding of the concept of fueling during long runs or bike rides. I think from reading a lot of posting - not only related to this topic - that people might be doing a whole lot better (performance wise) if they look at how they fuel. - not only quantity but also quality.

Clearly there are commercial products who can help you fuel, but that may not be panacea - in the past I have actually carried a peanut-butter-jelly wheat bread sandwich with me. I know people who were fortunate to have SAG vehicle who packed frozen smoothies and by the time they met up, the smoothies were thawed, the list goes on. There are lots of alternatives. Although most of it does not apply to me, I have used a lot of information from Ben Greenfield on Enduranceplanet.com and Bengreenfieldfitness.com.

I would highly recommend looking at some of the nutrition books for athletes (Nancy Clark RD is one of the authorities on sports nutrition - and her books is recommended by many including SP coach Nancy). Take a look at the books on fueling for marathons, the concepts can be translated into cycling.



"You are the CEO of your one person company" Chris 'Macca' McCormack three time ironman world champion.
BLJORDAN's Photo BLJORDAN Posts: 58
6/29/11 10:41 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Your body is different from everybody elses, so you need to listen to what it is telling you and try different things. In the past I use to load up on carbs the night before and have a small bowl of pasta before the ride along with energy drinks, gels and bars during the ride. During the ride I would hit a wall or just loose everything I consumed (if you know what I mean). I found out I didn't need of that stuff, because my body was different from the magazine articles and other individuals.

Now my routine before a century ride is to consumer water, but not to much, stretch and shoot the breeze with people. During the ride (depending on the temp outside) I may mix GU20 in my waterbottles, but if the temp is lower than it is straight water. During the ride I will pack two cliff bars and sometimes a banana and that it is. That is all I will consume during a century ride. I felt stronger eating less and lighter foods than others. For fluid consumption I still put down about 30 ounces an hour.

DDOORN's Photo DDOORN Posts: 23,912
6/29/11 8:59 A

Community Team Member

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I like to keep it simple & cheap when it comes to fueling to avoid bonking on longer rides. Sugar colas and / or chocolate milk work well to keep me going and avoid the kind of symptoms you describe.

Don

Co-Team Leader for All Health Pros, Binghamton Area Losers & Laid Off But Staying Strong SparkTeams

Don't die with your music still in you. -- Dr. Wayne Dyer

"We either make ourselves miserable or we make ourselves strong. The amount of work is the same." --- Carlos Castaneda

"You yourself, as much as anybody in the entire universe, deserve your love and affection." --- Buddha

rules4humans.com


 Pounds lost: 112.3 
 
0
30
60
90
120
BILL60's Photo BILL60 Posts: 334,015
6/28/11 2:32 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Since you're a relative beginner to the sport, I would wait before getting into speed and power. I believe that's more like biking 301. You're at the basic 101 level and need to feel comfortable on the bike and doing long rides once weekly. After you've mastered those two, then perhaps you can jump to level 2 and level 3. You will discover that the higher the level, the more $$ you'll spend. I spent big bucks on aero bike/ wheels, Garmin GPS and a German power meter. Go slow and enjoy.

Bill

"Excellence is but for the few."


 November Minutes: 1,482
 
0
812.5
1625
2437.5
3250
GIANT-STEPS SparkPoints: (65,379)
Fitness Minutes: (439)
Posts: 3,641
6/28/11 1:37 P

Send Private Message
Reply
As far as training goes I'm a big believer in quality instead of quantity. You don't need to do 100 mile training rides to do a century but you do need to get some long rides in.
Every training schedule should include some work on speed and power as well as long Steady Distance training.
Consider peaking for your century. In the weeks leading up to your century increase the distance and intensity of your rides until the week before your century where you back way off so you can ride your century well rested.
You don't need state of the art equipment for a century but you do want a good light fast and dependable bike though a 20 pound bike isn't going to help you finish much better than a 25 pound one. Be sure to have low enough gears for any anticipated climbs; in fact you should probably have a little lower gear than you expect to need as a "bail out"" gear. Your equipment should be gear that is adjusted correctly, is comfortable, and that you are used to. Using something new for an event is asking for trouble.
Get used to eating on rides. In high school track we were told not to eat anything 3 hours before training or races so eating on long bike rides was foreign to me; the first few times I thought I was going to throw up. You body learns not to send all the blood to your legs and send a little to the stomach after you eat a few times on rides. Now I get a little gnarly around 20 miles. Everyone is different for what tastes good and sits well with them on rides. Right now I'm a fan of Larabars. Both Apple and Cherry pie flavors are great! Try a few different snacks until you find something you like. I noticed that boiled new potatoes were popular with brevet riders.

SAMANTHA_SP's Photo SAMANTHA_SP SparkPoints: (41,094)
Fitness Minutes: (85,209)
Posts: 395
6/28/11 8:02 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
It sounds like a fuel issue. I love to drink a coconut water before and after I ride. I always drink a coke and Haney a snickers bar at mile 70. The sugar will give you that last boost you need.

‎"Take the first step in faith. You don't have to see the whole staircase. Just take the first step." - Martin Luther King Jr.

twitter.com/samanthaD707
BILL60's Photo BILL60 Posts: 334,015
6/28/11 7:53 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
When I started out, I also was pooped at about the 70 mile point. I now am pooped, but under control when I finish my centuries for 2 principal reasons. Most every week (winter, spring, summer, fall) I do a long ride from 60 to 95 miles. Secondly, most every day I do pull ups and stomach crunches. I'm 66 and still going strong. While there's other things that I do to stay strong, those are the principal ones.

"Excellence is but for the few."


 November Minutes: 1,482
 
0
812.5
1625
2437.5
3250
TENISWHIZ's Photo TENISWHIZ SparkPoints: (35,875)
Fitness Minutes: (49,969)
Posts: 8,560
6/28/11 6:46 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I've been learning more and more the ULTRA importance of Core work as well. My whole body starts to poop out on longer rides. Several people now have told me their cycling has totally changed with good core work. One 55 year old man said he does core work 40 min. every AM (sounds too much for me and I doubt one has to do that much) and has been able to keep up with 25 year olds on fast, long rides. He did look pretty fit and firm as well. The longer I ride, the more my lower back starts to give in and my whole demeanor begins to pay the price. So....I've been incorporating more core work in my training. YouTube has several good workouts for cyclists.

Good Luck


Leader/Co Leader of:

Beautiful Beagles Team,

lynnkirchhoff.wordpress.com/


 Pounds lost: 3.0 
 
0
6.25
12.5
18.75
25
ACTIVE_AT_60's Photo ACTIVE_AT_60 Posts: 3,039
6/28/11 6:41 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Here is one example of a training plan www.ultracycling.com/training/centur
y.
html
I agree

Ask as many questions as you need.

The mental part you may need to work on a little .

I agree you need to fuel better. My preference is HEED (from Hammernutrition.com) for the majority of the ride and then the latter 1/4 I switch to Perpetuem from the same company since it has a little protein in it. You may also think about a couple of gels in between. I have done quite a few centuries and it took a little time to get the nutrition dialed in. However, often people don't get enough calories on the day of the ride.



"You are the CEO of your one person company" Chris 'Macca' McCormack three time ironman world champion.
KJNE8O's Photo KJNE8O SparkPoints: (192,838)
Fitness Minutes: (189,257)
Posts: 8,463
6/28/11 6:35 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
It definitely sounds like you are "bonking" - are you drinking any kind of carb drink like HEED or Accelerade? Are you getting electrolytes while riding and are you getting protein through out the ride? How are you training for these long rides? Do you ever have troubles with not staying strong on longer rides?

Sorry for all the questions :)

Kris

If you focus on results, you will never change. If you focus on change, you will get results. Jack Dixon

If we all did the things we are capabale of doing we would literally astound ourselves.
Thomas Edison


 current weight: 154.0 
 
160
153.75
147.5
141.25
135
THOMTOM's Photo THOMTOM Posts: 70
6/28/11 6:03 A

Send Private Message
Reply
Welcome to the century club. emoticon On long rides I eat a lot of fruit & veggie. and on trainang I ride 13 to 25 ml. a day , but ever one is not the same. emoticon

 current weight: 257.0 
 
340
302.25
264.5
226.75
189
OUTDOORSYJORDY's Photo OUTDOORSYJORDY SparkPoints: (1,634)
Fitness Minutes: (2,375)
Posts: 31
6/28/11 1:07 A

Send Private Message
Reply
Hey yall...
I just did a century and I've been riding about 3 years.
And it seems like I start off really strong. and slowly keep on getting slower and slower.
Until I feel like I am barley moving.

And every century I've done it never fails I tapp out around mile 70,
My legs cramp up and mentally just fizzle.
Any advice?
Any tips on what I should do in training???
And how many days a week would you ride?
Sorry so many questions... still a newbie and I LOVE to be on my bike.
I would like to hear some advice. Thanks. :)

 current weight: 143.0 
 
143
138.5
134
129.5
125
Page: 1 of (1)  

Report Innappropriate Post

Other Cycling - Road, Mountain, Fun, Racing General Team Discussion Forum Posts

Topics: Last Post:
January Riding Challenge 2/1/2014 11:30:01 AM
World-Wide Ride of Silence: Any Participants? 5/13/2014 9:19:38 PM
Bikes for Tikes! 12/17/2013 10:30:53 AM
really stupid ? about gear shifting 8/18/2014 12:58:48 PM
Hands going numb? 5/5/2014 3:31:07 PM

Thread URL: http://www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/team_messageboard_thread.asp?board=0x1670x42679966

Review our Community Guidelines