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DANIELBS80's Photo DANIELBS80 SparkPoints: (316)
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2/28/11 5:59 P

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I adjusted the handlebars and brakes and rode it 5 miles on a nature trail. It was real nice to be able to ride on the flatbar for flat ground to relax and on the hoods of the dropbar brakes was a dramatic difference in the amount of power i could use to accelerate and it felt a lot better and easier for going uphill to hold on to those brakes. I'll be putting 700x25 or 28 tires on it this week as well as different gears for faster road performance. I had thought about getting an entire road bike handlebar but I didn't really like how narrow they are. I wanted the ability to hold onto my real comfy grips when I hold onto the top. I might down the road get my handle bar cut down on both ends maybe an inch to bring in my drops a little that way I can keep my ergo flatbar grips that i love. I'd say having this set up is a huge improvement over how it came stock and it only cost me about $200 extra.

Here's some pics of everything all set.

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Edited by: DANIELBS80 at: 2/28/2011 (18:02)
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CYCLEBUDDY's Photo CYCLEBUDDY SparkPoints: (0)
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2/28/11 4:52 P

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Wow! That is an interesting set up! Let us know how it feels! I had a mountain bike I used as a commuter with a cheap pair of bar ends, but I haven't seen anything like this before.

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TIKATIK's Photo TIKATIK SparkPoints: (0)
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2/28/11 1:26 A

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Looks like an original setup there! Just looking at it I would say that yes you should move them down a bit. They seem like they would be hard to grab in an emergency. On my old mountain bike I had non-riser handle bars and used bar ends. These were great because when you are on a trail they give you much more "pulling" leverage with your hands on a steep climb. They also helped on the road because it gave you another hand position. I now have riser bars and dont use bar ends but I miss them and have thought about switchin back. If you are like alot of us, you will change your setup many times before you are done!

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DANIELBS80's Photo DANIELBS80 SparkPoints: (316)
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2/25/11 8:40 P

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here's what i just did so far i still need to run some new brake cables through. I think i'll rewrape the drop bars though. do i need to move the brakes down a little?

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DANIELBS80's Photo DANIELBS80 SparkPoints: (316)
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2/25/11 7:08 A

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I still need to put brakes and tape on the drop bars. I read the drop bars should be about shoulder width apart, right now they are just a little bit move than my shoulders though, just about by an inch.

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KESTREL500's Photo KESTREL500 Posts: 1,173
2/24/11 10:13 P

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Not sure, never saw such a setup before, sorry maybe someone else can be of more help.

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DANIELBS80's Photo DANIELBS80 SparkPoints: (316)
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2/24/11 7:21 P

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I just got some drop bars and put them on. Is this how they go on or should I move them in toward the middle more?

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GIDGET73's Photo GIDGET73 Posts: 83
2/19/11 7:34 P

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To kind of reiterate Topahi, the geometry of the bike is key here. You bought a bike that really isn't suited to speed on a road or flat path. You can certainly log thousands of miles on the road with it, but even with slimmer tires and different handlebars, you aren't changing the general shape of your body on the bike. Drops don't make a lot of sense on that bike. If you are doing sidewalks and paths, you can't take advantage of the road tires or drops. Bikes are funny that way. If you want real versatility, you need two bikes. Good luck!

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DANIELBS80's Photo DANIELBS80 SparkPoints: (316)
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2/19/11 6:48 P

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yeah i plan to change the tires to thinner ones and perhaps the folk down the road if I feel it will make a dramatic difference but i just want to be able to get some good speed on a 3 mile stretch of road where the speed limit is 25-35 mph as easy and comfortable as possible. I like this bike, I looked around a lot before picking the one I wanted and a dedicated road bike isn't for me because I don't do that type of riding that much. I mostly on on sidewalks and bike paths so i figured if I put some more narrow tires that are better for the road and have those drop bars, it might make it more in the middle to suite my wants. I just want something that will work good for both kinds of terrain.

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TOPAHI's Photo TOPAHI SparkPoints: (14,026)
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2/19/11 6:11 P

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Usually it is not practical to switch bar types.
When this decision rears its ugly head, you are really looking at a different type of bike.

Putting drop bars on a "mountain" bike can really mess up the geometry.
Being in a more dropped position really isn't going to improve your speed on your current bike.
Adding "bar ends" will give you some additional hand positions.

Changing to different wheels/tires, lighter brakes, as well as a lighter fork (non suspension) will make your current ride into more of a road bike.
But again, at the cost to do this, you could probably buy a good used road bike.

Good luck with whatever you decide to do.



Tom

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DANIELBS80's Photo DANIELBS80 SparkPoints: (316)
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2/19/11 4:22 P

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i'm wondering if i can use inline brakes with my disk brakes. I'm assuming it's the same as the V brakes but I donno.

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DRC2205's Photo DRC2205 Posts: 8,845
2/19/11 4:19 P

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Hm, never saw them before! For the price listed in Amazon, I guess it would be worth trying. Let us know how it works for you!

DANIELBS80's Photo DANIELBS80 SparkPoints: (316)
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2/17/11 2:47 P

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yes you can, origin 8 makes drop bar ends and I just found out you can get inline brakes to put on both the drop bar and still have some on the flat bar like how i want. The inline brakes are from cane creek.

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DRC2205's Photo DRC2205 Posts: 8,845
2/17/11 2:43 P

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You can't add drops to your flat handlebars. You would have to switch them out. Yes, you can get "suicide brakes" to put on the drop handlebars, which would be along the top bar. I have a road bike--drop handlebars--and find that I most frequently ride on the hoods (the rest just above the brakes) and don't want anything extra on my bars.

DANIELBS80's Photo DANIELBS80 SparkPoints: (316)
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2/17/11 1:36 P

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ok say i get some drap bar ends to put on my falt bar, can i get some brakes to put in front of them in addition to the ones already on my flat bar? it would be nice to be able to break quickly if needed.

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SCOTTSU's Photo SCOTTSU SparkPoints: (0)
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2/17/11 1:34 P

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I agree with Don. If you're going for some distance you need to be able to keep changing positions for your hands, shoulders and back. Also, if you're riding into a big headwind with a lot of miles ahead of you, you want to be able to go into the drops and get yourself out of the wind for as long as you can. Drop handle bars really aren't as daunting as they might seem. And you can often get a stem on your bike that's longer so that your drop isn't quite as deep.

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DDOORN's Photo DDOORN Posts: 23,538
2/17/11 12:07 P

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Thoughts on drop downs:

This was the pitch my LBS gave me and I have to admit I've found their advice very helpful and true in this case:

If you are considering longer distance cycling drop downs are very helpful in offering one a variety of positions while riding: 1) upright with hands in on the straight parts of the handlebars, 2) on the hoods and 3) further over on the drops. I find it MOST helpful to be able to shift from one to the other at different points of my ride.

Don

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DANIELBS80's Photo DANIELBS80 SparkPoints: (316)
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2/17/11 10:56 A

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PERFECTLY, YOU KNOW A LOT. THANKS YOU VERY MUCH!

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DRC2205's Photo DRC2205 Posts: 8,845
2/17/11 10:47 A

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LOL, let's see if I can help with some of those questions.

"Can someone tell me what the benifits are for both? Is the reason for the drop bars so you can lower yourself while riding? does it make you go much faster?"

First, I'm going to include some genrealizations: Flat bars are primarily for mountain biking. They put you in a more upright position and allow easier handling on the trails. Drops are primarily for road biking and longer distances. They provide multiple positions for your hands and body. You can be more upright or "in the drops"--a more aerodynamic position. The aerodynamic position is more aggressive and does help with speed when you are dealing with headwinds.


"how about the bar ends? do those make you any faster or do they just assist with hills? and if so, do they a great deal? Should I have both kinds of bars? Is there an attachment that has the bar ends and drop bars in one?"

Bar ends are available for the flat bar handlebars. They are extensions that allow for a second, generally more upright position on the hands and body. So if you have drops, you already have three hands positions (top bar, hoods, and drops), and bar ends wouldn't make much of a difference. If you keep a flat bar and want to be able to change your positioning on the bike throughout the ride, they are a great idea to combat fatigue. I don't know how well they help with speed, though. I do believe you can switch the bars from bar to drop (and visa versa) and still keep your bike--but you will have to choose one kind of handlebars!


"It already seems like my handle bar is busy with those chunkier grips, bell, headlight, and gps holder it doesn't seem like I'd have too much room left but I'd be able to side things down a little enough to put bar ends or drop bars on if it will really help."

Yep, those handle bars can fill up fast. Bell and GPS should be pretty well centered on your bars, and out of the way of your grips. The headlight can go on the stem, and out of the way. Bar ends replace the ends of your handlebars--your grips won't change and nothing should need to moved or removed.


"Also, What about tires? This bike came with 700c 38 tires, I noticed my wifes bike tires are thinner, however not exactly road bike thin, she also has a hybrid type but for road riding, should i get thinner tires than my stock ones? Will it make me go faster with less effort or something? I can see why you wouldn't want big tred for the road but I dont think there is much tred on my current tires, it seems just like a medium amount like a general purpose tire."

The thinner the tire, the less resistance you have on the road, so yes--faster because of the difference in resisitance. If you are riding trails, you will need a more substancial tire than if you ride on the road. If you are doing both, you should be on a smoother tire. Your bike proabably won't handle a classic skinny tires (which would be a problem on trails), but they do make smooth tires to accommodate the hybrid bikes, and multiple surfaces. Bring your bike with you to a local bike shop (LBS) and tell them where you ride and what you do--they should be able to recommend a tire that suits *you*. And fits your rims.

Does that help, or just confuse the issue more?


DANIELBS80's Photo DANIELBS80 SparkPoints: (316)
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2/17/11 8:54 A

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I reciently got a new Trek Utopia with a flat bar and I want to start riding regularly and at 25+MPH for when I ride around on the road on military bases. I reciently changed my grips from the ones that came with the bike. You can see pictures of it on my profile images. But I am wondering if I should get either drop down bars and/or bar ends to aid in riding. Can someone tell me what the benifits are for both? Is the reason for the drop bars so you can lower yourself while riding? does it make you go much faster? how about the bar ends? do those make you any faster or do they just assist with hills? and if so, do they a great deal? Should I have both kinds of bars? Is there an attachment that has the bar ends and drop bars in one? It already seems like my handle bar is busy with those chunkier grips, bell, headlight, and gps holder it doesn't seem like I'd have too much room left but I'd be able to side things down a little enough to put bar ends or drop bars on if it will really help. Also, What about tires? This bike came with 700c 38 tires, I noticed my wifes bike tires are thinner, however not exactly road bike thin, she also has a hybrid type but for road riding, should i get thinner tires than my stock ones? Will it make me go faster with less effort or something? I can see why you wouldn't want big tred for the road but I dont think there is much tred on my current tires, it seems just like a medium amount like a general purpose tire.

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