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CAROLYN1ALASKA's Photo CAROLYN1ALASKA Posts: 10,873
2/13/11 9:50 P

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The only limitations I know of is, you'll probably have lots of flats if your wheels are very lightweight and your tires really light. You could even potato chip a really light weight radial-spoke wheel.
Pedals can also pose a problem. Speedplay (lollipop pedals) are only rated to about 180. I know because I had to replace mine when I gained weight. ;o(

“The only way to keep your health is to eat what you don't want, drink what you don't like, and do what you'd rather not.”
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CATS_MEOW_0911's Photo CATS_MEOW_0911 SparkPoints: (65,874)
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2/13/11 9:35 P

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Nah, I don't feel the need to build any new parts, and after checking the manual and hearing from you guys, I'm not too worried. I will check the specs later when I'm home, but I'm also okay with seeing the manual's weight limit. I am VERY antsy to get back to cycling outside--the stationary bike is getting tedious. :)

Erin

"To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest accomplishment."
-Ralph Waldo Emerson

"...every new beginning comes from some other beginning's end."
-Semisonic, "Closing Time"


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BLJORDAN's Photo BLJORDAN Posts: 58
2/13/11 9:28 P

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I've been using Mavic Ksyrium SL wheels for the past three years and have logged approximately 8,000 miles on them and have never trued them. If you feel the need to build a new rear wheel, make sure it is a 36 hole, four cross spoke lacing and a straight 14 gauge spoke with brass nipples. The rim should be a double wall and would highly recommend a double eyelet, but you can get away with a single eyelet. I would also suggest a welded seam instead of a pin. Sorry for the tech talk, 19 years in the bike industry does that some times. I had to many customers that worried about their weight and used it as a crutch. A lot of them said I will drop my weight to a certain weight then ride. They found themselves not riding at all. So do yourself a favor, just ride. Also, could you provide a little more information about your Trek. How old is it, what kind of parts on it, what width tire do you have (700 or 26" x...)

BARRONVC's Photo BARRONVC Posts: 1,845
2/13/11 9:22 P

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Don't worry about it! Just start losing and you'll be fine.

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CATS_MEOW_0911's Photo CATS_MEOW_0911 SparkPoints: (65,874)
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2/13/11 9:17 P

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Thanks for the input. I was assuming that the 275 lb weight limit includes the wheels and doesn't just apply to the frame (makes sense)--maybe I'll dig a little deeper to make sure.

I ride my road bike on flat concrete or asphalt only, so I make sure not to subject it to any major abuse. :)

Edited by: CATS_MEOW_0911 at: 2/13/2011 (21:19)
Erin

"To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest accomplishment."
-Ralph Waldo Emerson

"...every new beginning comes from some other beginning's end."
-Semisonic, "Closing Time"


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BARRONVC's Photo BARRONVC Posts: 1,845
2/13/11 9:16 P

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BLJORDAN is correct about equipment for the heavier riders. What about a fully loaded tandem? I've built wheels for them and they never had an issue. Used 40 spokes front and 48 rear, 14 gauge SS spokes, special order hubs and rim.

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BLJORDAN's Photo BLJORDAN Posts: 58
2/13/11 9:02 P

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I would worry less about the bike itself and more about the wheel. I've been in the bike industry is fully aware there are big people riding, thats why they have clydesdale classes for mountain biking. I am currently 255 roughly and have no issues with my road or mountain bikes. It is all about your finese and not weight. I have seen guys who weigh 150 lbs break parts all the time and I have seen guys over 300 lbs not even knock a wheel out of true.

DDOORN's Photo DDOORN Posts: 23,430
2/13/11 7:51 P

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Whew! Talk about incentive! :-)

Cycling ROCKS for whacking those pounds away!

Don

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"We either make ourselves miserable or we make ourselves strong. The amount of work is the same." --- Carlos Castaneda

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2/13/11 7:00 P

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I didn't have the original manual as the bike was a hand-me-down, but I did find their weight limits. For Trek's road bikes, they cite a weight limit of 275 pounds, so I should be pretty well below that weight by June. emoticon

Erin

"To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest accomplishment."
-Ralph Waldo Emerson

"...every new beginning comes from some other beginning's end."
-Semisonic, "Closing Time"


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HISTORIKELL's Photo HISTORIKELL Posts: 293
2/13/11 6:21 P

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I would suggest looking up the owner's manual for your specific bike (on the trek website if you don't have it); it probably lists a weight limit. Good luck in the tri!

There is only one corner of the universe you can be certain of improving and that is your own self.

--Aldous Huxley

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CATS_MEOW_0911's Photo CATS_MEOW_0911 SparkPoints: (65,874)
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2/13/11 6:16 P

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Hi all, I was wondering if anyone here may have experience or knowledge of weight limits for bicycles. I have a Trek road bike that I use for triathlons and duathlons, and I am much heavier (about 70 lbs heavier) than the last time I rode it. I am supposed to do the 15 mile bike leg of a tri in June, and I am not worries at all about being able to complete 15 miles. However, I am concerned about damaging my bike or getting flats.

Anyone know if it might be too risky at my current weight of 289 (hopefully less by the time of the tri!) to ride my Trek road bike? I have a clunky mountain bike that I use for tooling around and commuting, and although it is sturdier, I don't want to use it for the tri.

Thanks for any input!

Erin

"To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest accomplishment."
-Ralph Waldo Emerson

"...every new beginning comes from some other beginning's end."
-Semisonic, "Closing Time"


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