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CHICKYSOUP's Photo CHICKYSOUP Posts: 273
10/28/10 11:56 A

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Thank you for this info. Now that I have "upgraded" to a road bike and have been cycling longer distances I am looking forward to learning more about bike mechanics and maintenance. I'll keep this info filed awy for future reference!

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GIANT-STEPS SparkPoints: (65,379)
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10/28/10 11:18 A

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I wouldn't expect your tube to pop if it was pumped to a higher pressure. The only thing that would cause the tube to pop would be if part of it was between the tire bead and rim, the tire unseated or ripped allowing part of it to escape, or if your rim strip failed and allowed the tube to expand into your rim.

Currently there is almost a fetish for narrow tires. I remember when clinchers were 27x1-1/4 and sewups ranged from 22-28mm wide. Having narrower clinchers made your bike look racier since it looked more like the sewups racers used. As tires improved and could be run at higher pressure 27x1-1/8, 27x1, and even 27x7/8 became available. As 27" wheels left the market the typical 700c sizes were 700x23-700x25 and Michelin sold a lot of 700x19 tires (though their 19mm tires were wider than some other brands 23mm tires but that's another story). Everyone assumes the narrower the tire the better.

All else equal wider tires actually have less rolling resistance, last longer, have fewer flats, and a smoother ride. For everyone outside time trialists wider tires are usually better. Narrower tires are very slightly lighter and more aerodynamic though on many rims aerodynamics actually get worse as tires get narrower than 23mm.

Road bikes are usually limited how wide a tire they can use. My bike can barely run 28mm tires which work fine in front but I can only install or remove my rear wheel with a 28mm tire deflated. Many bikes today can not run any tires narrower than 25mm. Short reach brakes at best can clear about a 32mm tire and that is if the frame is constructed such that the brake pads are at the bottom of the caliper slot and there is clearance everywhere else.

Tires bottoming out can be prevented by either higher pressure or wider tires. Most road bike riders would be best served by using the widest practical tire on their bike. 700c hybrids usually already have nice wide tires though the stock tires are usually not the greatest. Keep your tires inflated and consider wider tires when it is time to replace them.

Edited by: GIANT-STEPS at: 10/28/2010 (11:20)
CHICKYSOUP's Photo CHICKYSOUP Posts: 273
10/27/10 6:43 P

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Well, I was able to find some time this weekend to stop by the LBS. Turns out I had a small dent in the rear rim where it contacted with the metal grate. LBS guy said it was probably b/c my rear tire was a tad under inflated. However, he thought had it really been at 110 psi, the tube probably would have popped. He was able to file the dent out and it has been smooth riding since. Once he pointed the dent out to me, I was surprised I has missed it although it was fairly small and right up against the tire. Thank you to everyone who replied!

Edited by: CHICKYSOUP at: 10/27/2010 (18:45)
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GIANT-STEPS SparkPoints: (65,379)
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10/27/10 1:55 P

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Check your tire. It may be unseated in one spot or part of the tire may have even tore away from the bead.

You could also check for a dented your rim. Try taking your tire off then use an adjustable wrench as a gauge and see if there is a wide spot in our rim.

If you find a wide spot than you can usually pound it back with a piece of wood over the rim and a hammer.

If your rim has a seam instead of a weld (rare these days) check to see if there is now a ridge.

TOPAHI's Photo TOPAHI SparkPoints: (14,026)
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10/26/10 10:04 P

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It could be that the wheel is not bottomed out in the dropouts. Your meeting with the grate could have tweaked it sideways. Loosen the rear quick release lever push down on the bike (not the tire) while tightening the lever. Make sure the quick release is tight, it should be HARD to push the lever closed.
You can check for a bent rim by holding the rear of the bicycle off the ground and spinning the rear tire. Watch the gap between the rim and brake pad on each side to see if the rim wobbles side to side.

Tom

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The treadmill is NOT!

Never argue with idiots... They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.


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DAVISJH's Photo DAVISJH Posts: 64
10/21/10 1:10 P

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I experinced a similar clicking last spring from a broken spoke - but its clicking wasn't tied to braking...

2009 Cycling Goal: 2,750 miles (3,500 miles 8/15)
Year to 10/2: 3,255 miles
Previous Goals/Miles:
2008 2,500 mi/2,419.1 logged (80.9 miles short)
2007 (1/2 Year): 1,000 mi/ 1,002 logged!!


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PERRYR's Photo PERRYR Posts: 668
10/21/10 12:45 P

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Yep - Sounds like a bent rim to me

BEVPRESLEY's Photo BEVPRESLEY SparkPoints: (130,266)
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10/21/10 12:25 P

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DH says you knocked your wheel out of round. Do you see a little wabble in it when you spin it? The LBS should be able to fix it for you.

beverly

One Day at a Time:
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August 2014 goals:
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CHICKYSOUP's Photo CHICKYSOUP Posts: 273
10/21/10 12:15 P

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Hi everyone. I have a maintenance issue for my new Trek 1.2 WSD (about 3 weeks old). I've tried looking for answers online to no avail and I won't be able to get to my LBS until next weekend so wanted to check here too.

After (accidentally) going over a huge metal grate in the road yesterday morning (the kind that vents the subway underground) while in a left turn only lane, I started hearing a rhythmic clicking sound when I start to engage my brakes to slow. It stops when I brake a bit harder to come to a full stop. The weird thing is that I can't duplicate it when I'm not sitting on the bike so it is really hard to tell what it is. My boyfriend went around the block on it and he can't figure it out either.

The brake pads are properly aligned to the rim and I ran my fingers along the rim and I can't feel any bumps or obstructions. I think it is coming from the rear tire. The performance of the brakes don't seem to be affected but I don't want to just assume that they will hold. I also can't feel any obstructions or anything off when pedaling.

Has anyone encountered anything similar to this? Needless to say I will be avoiding that left hand turn in the future!
Thanks!

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