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DDOORN's Photo DDOORN Posts: 23,994
1/3/11 11:17 A

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Bought my son a Giant...he's been very happy with it also.

Don

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Don't die with your music still in you. -- Dr. Wayne Dyer

"We either make ourselves miserable or we make ourselves strong. The amount of work is the same." --- Carlos Castaneda

"You yourself, as much as anybody in the entire universe, deserve your love and affection." --- Buddha

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FUZZMARTIN's Photo FUZZMARTIN SparkPoints: (5,993)
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1/3/11 10:50 A

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I had my bike-shop-purchased Schwinn from when I was 13 all the way until I was 30 (two years ago). When that bike couldn't be fixed any more, I picked up a Giant road bike. I love it.

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KJEANNE's Photo KJEANNE SparkPoints: (39,576)
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11/30/10 6:48 P

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Thanks for the advice Giant-Steps, I did replace my stem, which did help. I was able to ride several years with that stem. But I have an acute case of Lupus that has left my hands very weak, numb and swollen. I have a lot of trouble shifting and braking on the road bike. Make bike riding stressful when you don’t know if you’ll have hand power to brake. I have less trouble shifting and braking on my recumbent. Must have something to do with the different hand position on a recumbent.

Do not look where you fell, but where you slipped.
African proverb


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11/29/10 6:45 P

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I used to sell LeMond racing bikes. Greg Lemond was even scheduled to visit the bike shop I was managing but then he got shot and never made it.

Lemond bikes had long top tubes and fit men who were long in the torso and who liked a stage race type geometry. My other brand was Miyatas which had a average top tube length and steeper angles in their racing models.

Have you looked into Nitto Technomic stems for your Lemond? Would having your handlebars an inch or two higher allow you to enjoy your Lemond again?

KJEANNE's Photo KJEANNE SparkPoints: (39,576)
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11/29/10 1:12 P

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Giant Steps:
I agree with your thoughts on steel frames. I have a 2002 LeMonds road bike that I am pretending to sell. I have replaced it with a recumbent trike. I love that bike but can no longer ride it due to hand weakness and numbness from Lupus. It just sits in my garage collecting dust. I put an ad in Craig’s List but made sure to price it too high for any offers to come in. Time to get real and really sell it. I know it will make someone very happy!


Do not look where you fell, but where you slipped.
African proverb


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DAVEINSEOUL's Photo DAVEINSEOUL SparkPoints: (36,812)
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11/29/10 12:04 A

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Absolutely cool! I really, really want an Elliptigo, but I'm saving my money for a road bike :-)

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DRC2205's Photo DRC2205 Posts: 8,845
11/22/10 12:23 P

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Love the new concepts...

DDOORN's Photo DDOORN Posts: 23,994
11/18/10 10:51 P

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Very cool! Great to see innovations going on out there...!

Don

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Don't die with your music still in you. -- Dr. Wayne Dyer

"We either make ourselves miserable or we make ourselves strong. The amount of work is the same." --- Carlos Castaneda

"You yourself, as much as anybody in the entire universe, deserve your love and affection." --- Buddha

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11/18/10 1:30 P

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Another interesting design:

http://www.rowbike.com/

Good for a change at least.

DRC2205's Photo DRC2205 Posts: 8,845
11/18/10 8:46 A

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That's so cool. I want one!

DDOORN's Photo DDOORN Posts: 23,994
11/18/10 7:06 A

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Speaking of bicycle developments, anybody seen THIS contraption?

www.elliptigo.com/

Check out the videos they have of the Elliptigo in action...looks like it would be so much FUN to use one of these!

Don

Co-Team Leader for All Health Pros, Binghamton Area Losers & Laid Off But Staying Strong SparkTeams

Don't die with your music still in you. -- Dr. Wayne Dyer

"We either make ourselves miserable or we make ourselves strong. The amount of work is the same." --- Carlos Castaneda

"You yourself, as much as anybody in the entire universe, deserve your love and affection." --- Buddha

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11/17/10 2:45 P

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I worked my way through college managing and wrenching at bike shops. I'm pretty knowledgable about the workings of bikes except things like suspension forks that came out after I quit the biz'

When I talk to engineers from different fields they often ask why bicycles are built such-and-such and my answer is generally, that is the way they have always done it.

I would be very interested in seeing what engineers would come up doing a clean sheet bicycle design. Current bicycle development is evolutionary rather than revolutionary.

20 years ago I made predictions about future bicycle design. I expected bicycles to be monocoques instead of frames by now. Seeing that increased rear wheel dishing weakening spoked wheels I expected them to be replaced on racing bikes with composite wheels by now. I also expected internal geared hubs to have replaced derailleurs on all utility bikes.

Monocoque bikes were made for a while but mostly for time trials until the UCI banned them for bike racing competition. Composite wheels have not caught on and cyclists now accept less durable wheels than they would in the past since they tend to be replaced frequently so the cyclist can sport the latest boutique wheel. A number of promising internal geared hubs have been built including the amazing 14 speed Roloff hub but these have not caught on for most cyclists. I did see a guy touring with one and asked him about it and he said he loved it and can't figure out why all tourists don't use them now. I think the $1,400 price tag for this hub has something to do with it.

DRC2205's Photo DRC2205 Posts: 8,845
11/16/10 9:34 P

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I liked the perspective. Thanks!

DDOORN's Photo DDOORN Posts: 23,994
11/16/10 6:56 P

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Whoa...! I know there is a LOT I need to learn about bicycles, but THAT was very humbling...lol!

Don

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Don't die with your music still in you. -- Dr. Wayne Dyer

"We either make ourselves miserable or we make ourselves strong. The amount of work is the same." --- Carlos Castaneda

"You yourself, as much as anybody in the entire universe, deserve your love and affection." --- Buddha

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11/16/10 11:46 A

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Things are getting tougher for folks who want bicycles to be a lifetime investment. Back in the day bicycle standards were stable for a long time. The leading brand of bicycle parts, Campagnolo only came out with a new gruppo about once a decade. When I bought my Super Record gruppo in the 80's they stills old their Nuevo Record gruppo from the 70's and their Gran Sport gruppo from the 60's and the components were interchangeable. Now new groups are introduced every year and the rapid changes mean that components only a few years old are obsolete and a few years older are orphans.

My 35 year old bike has a French threaded bottom bracket which is obsolete. My bottom bracket is getting rather crunchy but the options for replacement are few and expensive (Phil Wood or vintage NOS or used). My 25 year old bike has Italian threading which is still made and used but probably won't be for long.

I count most of the recent changes to bicycles as improvements. Headsets used to be the Achilles Heel on bicycles. They required special tools, were difficult to adjust and even top of the line 1" threaded headsets only lasted a year or two for long distance riders. Threadless forks/headsets are easier to adjust and makes bikes feel and handle better by stiffening up the front end. While 1" threadless are still made both road and mountain bike markets seem to be standardizing on 1-1/8" headsets which will beef up an area of the bike that needed it. I'm not a fan of the newer integrated headsets where bearings are pressed directly into machined head tubes; The problem with these is when the press fit head tube gets damaged the whole frame will need to be replaced rather than just a headset; hopefully these won't catch on though I do have to admit that they look cool and that will probably guaranty eventual success.

The obsolescence of French and Italian bottom brackets will be inconvenient for curmudgeons like me but the British/ISO standard threading with left hand threads on the right hand side is superior since it tends to tighten with use instead of loosen like nationalities with right hand threads.

Now that Bottom brackets are mostly standardized on British/ISO threads they are now another area to expect changes. Bottom bracket lengths were decided back when bikes had a single gear. Now that the rear wheel and cluster width have been growing the 68mm English and 70mm Italian bottom brackets are both too narrow. 73mm wide bottom brackets have been made but only for mountain bikes and never really caught on. The bottom bracket diameter was adequate back in the days when bikes had loose cup and cone bearings but it is too small for modern bottom brackets with cartridge bearings and especially now that component makers are using larger spindles to stiffen up the bottom bracket. Some new bottom bracket standards have been proposed to address shortcomings in current bottom brackets but all of these have press in bearings and share the shortcomings of integrated headsets where damaged bearing seats mean that the frame will need to be replaced instead of just the bottom bracket. The current "solution" is external bearing bottom brackets where the cups screw into the bottom bracket but the larger bearings sit outside of it. Rather inelegant and now doubt could be improved on.

Bicycles are still long term investments but not as long as they used to be.

DDOORN's Photo DDOORN Posts: 23,994
11/15/10 6:33 P

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That's what I'M hoping for...! :-)

Don

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Don't die with your music still in you. -- Dr. Wayne Dyer

"We either make ourselves miserable or we make ourselves strong. The amount of work is the same." --- Carlos Castaneda

"You yourself, as much as anybody in the entire universe, deserve your love and affection." --- Buddha

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11/15/10 12:09 P

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6,000 miles? I have tires that lasted longer than that. My two bikes are about 25 and 35 years old. A quality bike should last as long as you care to ride it.

SIGLED's Photo SIGLED Posts: 463
11/14/10 11:24 A

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I have two Dawes bikes. The first one went 5,000 miles with little maintenance. Still going strong. My son in law rode it in a 60 mile organized ride this year. And then 2 mos later in a 40 mile ride.

My second Dawes has about 6,000 miles on it with the usual maintenance and still going strong.

The problem with your boyfriends bike: K-Mart and bike do not make a long lasting bike.

You don't have to spend a fortune on a long lasting bike. But do have to plan a few hundred dollars.

I don't ride the bike to lose weight, but I lose weight to ride the bike!

To GOD be the Glory!



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DDOORN's Photo DDOORN Posts: 23,994
11/14/10 12:12 A

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After riding my son's Diamondback Wildwood for a year I decided I wanted a bike that would go the distance for me and invested WAY more than I ever thought I would in a Specialized Tricross earlier this year. I've been VERY pleased with the bike and feel pretty confident that this will be able to carry me through on the multi-day, multi-state touring cycling that I'm planning to work up to.

I'm hoping to baby this bike FOREVER! :-)

Don

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Don't die with your music still in you. -- Dr. Wayne Dyer

"We either make ourselves miserable or we make ourselves strong. The amount of work is the same." --- Carlos Castaneda

"You yourself, as much as anybody in the entire universe, deserve your love and affection." --- Buddha

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TERRYMEMPHIS's Photo TERRYMEMPHIS Posts: 454
11/13/10 6:07 A

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What kind of accident did you have and what did it involve? I rode all summer with no mishaps and then boom in the month og October. Road rash and soreness.



GIANT-STEPS SparkPoints: (65,379)
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11/11/10 5:29 P

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I don't consider bikes to be outrageously priced today.

Entry level road bikes today shift and stop better than top of the line bikes decades ago. When you factor in inflation, entry level bikes are not more expensive than they have been in the past but now most of these bikes have light aluminum alloy frames instead of the heavy high carbon steel of the past.

Over all you can get more bicycle for your money now than ever.

Quality bicycles are investments not toys. They last for years and can provide many times your purchase price in enjoyment, fitness, and transportation.

TOPAHI's Photo TOPAHI SparkPoints: (14,026)
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11/10/10 6:47 P

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Be careful here...The Schwinn of today is not the same as it used to be. Neither is Cannondale which was just bought by the same parent company that owns Schwinn (Pacific Cycles). This same parent company has bought a lot of the old respected bike name brands.
You can get a quality bike from one of these brands, but they are usually mid-priced and sold sold at bike stores (like Performance).
Trust me, I know how outrageously priced bikes are today, but there are good deals out there, especially used.
I suppose the most important thing is... no matter where you bought it - get out and ride it!

Tom

Riding a bike is FUN!
The treadmill is NOT!

Never argue with idiots... They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.


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SEORSA's Photo SEORSA Posts: 22
11/6/10 4:13 P

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Some great advice from some knowledgeable people. I generally agree, but have a couple caveats in defense of KMart and Walmart bikes: They can be good quality bikes such as Schwinn or Cannondale, but some of the components are cheap. Generally you will get more mileage and value out of a "price point" bike from your LBS. That said, I am going to tell you why I bought a KMart bike- wasn't sure if I wanted to really Mountain nike, so spent about 125 for a "Mongoose". This is a bike that is made to mongoose's specs, but has cheap chines parts and a heavy frame. I actually have rebuilt it (a lot of rough use and in weather)and use it as my commute bike: the only con: the cheap chines shocks can't be rebuilt, so they squeak. But I don't really care if it gets stolen, and have only replaced worn parts, put on some slicks and a mil carton. I often start then drop new things, so it was a good call for me, and it is about 14 years old now, running like new except for the squeak!

This is important: WD-40 is NOT a lubricant!!!!!! It is really a solvent (great for getting rust off of an old bicycle chain.

And my oldest bike: 1971 Schwinn Collegiate Supersport. The original tires and tubes were on it when I bought it at a garage sale. So a good steel bike that is cared for? I could see a hundred years useful life easily.

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GIANT-STEPS SparkPoints: (65,379)
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10/18/10 4:09 P

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Some department stores actually have a real bike mechanic come in one day/week to assemble bicycles while others trust the job to the same employee who assembles lawn furniture. I've never done it myself but I know other mechanics who have picked up a few bucks doing this.

I've seen some pretty scary things at department stores as well. I always wonder how they can let dangerous bikes roll out the door in our litigious society.

SHORTY004's Photo SHORTY004 Posts: 554
10/18/10 10:48 A

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The police department in my town does an auction every year. It includes a lot of bikes (I live in a huge mountain biking area). You can get nice, used bikes for very little money. I have never bought a bike from our auction but I know quite a few people who have...just a thought.

Strength = The ability to break a bar of chocolate in four pieces with your bare hands and eat only one piece.


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10/10/10 12:13 P

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Re. used bike-if you get one with any aluminum components, check them carefully for cracks--especially the cranks (part the pedal screws into) and handlebars. Even a hairline crack can suddenly fail in aluminum, and if either cranks or handlebars fail, you can take a nasty spill.

Re. flat tire on bike: it's more surprising he could ride for two months and NOT have a flat tire! Flat tires happen, and it usually isn't conveniently at home when you first go to get on the bike. BF needs to get extra tubes and all the tools to repair a flat on the road, learn how to do it properly, and practice a couple of times, so he doesn't get stuck somewhere.

TOPAHI's Photo TOPAHI SparkPoints: (14,026)
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10/8/10 1:00 P

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Not only is "what" you buy important, but "where" you buy it is also.
The local bike shop by me offers free lifetime tune-ups.
My wife's bike cost only a little more than one at walmart and it was properly assembled and fitted to her.
My wife's bike had three consecutive flats.
The tube was replaced twice, and then finally the rim... Free of charge.
Think about the training of the people who are assembling the bike at WalMart.
I routinely see bikes in horrible shape there.
Are you going to trust the brakes from a bike at Walmart to stop you when headed downhill toward a busy intersection at 25 mph?

Edited by: TOPAHI at: 10/8/2010 (13:01)
Tom

Riding a bike is FUN!
The treadmill is NOT!

Never argue with idiots... They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.


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9/20/10 4:08 P

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I never think of what a bicycle is worth; I think about what the bike is worth to me.

I've spent more than my bike was worth on repairs and upgrades many times. If you have a bike you enjoy riding than that is the main thing. Now if you have a bike you aren't really happy with than don't waste time or money on it.

I'm a pack rat myself. I can never bare to part with any bicycle or parts I own.

TISHDAD's Photo TISHDAD Posts: 25
9/19/10 12:24 P

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I have a Trek 1200 entry level road bike cost$700.00.
Which I bought five yrs.ago I replaced the wheels and
seat which made a big difference in the ride.A recent
accident I needed to again replace the wheels and the front fork but again it rode like a champ. Next riding season I'll replace all the cables,gears and chain.
This will be the last go around as I've probably spent
more on improvements than the bike is worth.

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JRSTACY98's Photo JRSTACY98 Posts: 261
9/7/10 12:03 A

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Definitely get it checked out at a bike shop!!!! Depending the type of riding he does a low end hybrid might be a better price point and give him a better bike?

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REBCCA's Photo REBCCA SparkPoints: (270,288)
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9/1/10 10:26 P

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WONGERCHI:
The header I took was over a thousand miles ago and since then I have thoroughly inspected my frame and forks and had it checked at LBS, after describing the accident. (LBS guys have become friends who I do trust on my safe riding care)

I Love the tip on tapping, this was something I had not thought of but have used to distinquish gold coins from all others, good wood from compromised wood on sailboats etc, etc. Thank You!!

Edited by: REBCCA at: 9/1/2010 (22:29)
"Learn from nature: See how everything gets accomplished and how the miracle of life unfolds without dissatisfaction or unhappiness."
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DRC2205's Photo DRC2205 Posts: 8,845
9/1/10 2:59 P

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First of all, don't go hating all Schwinns. They make some really nice bikes. They just don;t seel them at Wal-Mart, K-Mart and Target. They sell the good ones at bike shops.

Some great advice here, though. Good luck to him!



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8/31/10 4:22 P

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As Penn of Penn and Teller observed, the big print giveth, the small print taketh away. This certainly applies to warranties. When I was in the biz' the biggest joke was that using a bicycle in competition voided the warranty. So, using a racing bike for the purpose it was designed rendered your warranty null and void. Of course when a racing bike failed we never volunteered that the rider was on our team or that he was doing anything other than "just going down the road." Even though the competition clause isn't in most warranties things have gotten worse since then. Frames that fail due to accidents or "normal wear and tear" are not strictly covered and there is no implication that frames are supposed to last forever. I would add that Cannondale is a good company and when I sold them they always stood behind their product even on questionable claims but their warranty doesn't really guaranty much. They also had a crash replacement program that replaced frames at a major discount after accidents; it didn't cover the labor but our shop always switched the components over gratis.

I certainly don't want to make every carbon fiber rider neurotic about their frame breaking; A bike falling to the cement isn't what I could consider a heavy crash. Riding into an immovable object, being sideswiped by a motor vehicle, or something heavy falling onto your bike are things that would make me worry. My wife's bike has a carbon fiber fork and her bike fell off our car hitch rack while I was driving about 35 MPH (I thought she secured it and she thought I did but as the driver I accept full responsibility). I'm not worried about that incident.

I'm very much a "steel is real" cyclist. I can understand wanting to save ounces when racing up the Pyrenees but I don't sweat it if one bike weighs a pound or two more than another. Steel frames will never be as light as the best aluminum, titanium, and carbon fiber frames but they aren't that much heavier. One of the things I like about steel is that it does fail gradually instead of suddenly. The one steel frame I broke creaked months before the seat stay gave way. I spent a lot of time greasing nearly everything on that bike trying to fix the creak when it ended up being the frame itself. After a heavy crash you don't have to wonder if your frame is ok with steel. If it looks ok it should be safe even if you have to straighten it (except certain steels that can't safely be cold set, I wouldn't ride these). I also find that a good steel frame has a certain liveliness that I never saw duplicated on aluminum or carbon frames. Newer materials may be light and fast but they just don't feel as good to me (same thing with clinchers vs sewups in my book).

WONGERCHI's Photo WONGERCHI Posts: 3,889
8/31/10 1:08 P

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REBCCA:
Rule of thumb - if you are unsure, stop riding. Get it checked out at the LBS VERY thoroughly and do a full visual inspection, looking out for cracks and chips.

A CF weak spot can sometimes be detected by the sound it makes. If you tap your frame it should make a characteristic sound - something broken should sound different.

That said, CF is tougher than it looks. I took a header off my TT bike at ~22mph and the carbon fork (and the rest of the otherwise alu bike) is completely fine.

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8/31/10 11:02 A

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Interesting information here.
Giant Steps, I have a Cannondale Carbon Fiber road bike and am wondering about your statement, "Impacts that appear to have caused no damage could in fact cause invisible internal damage that will cause a failure later." What sort of failure could one expect could happen? I have been tossed from this bike at 17+ miles an hour with the bike impacting on cement. My LBS told me my frame is guaranteed for a lifetime, is there a gage to know how big an impact would warrant replacement? emoticon

"Learn from nature: See how everything gets accomplished and how the miracle of life unfolds without dissatisfaction or unhappiness."
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8/30/10 4:43 P

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Like I said elsewhere, department store bikes are designed for light and occasional use. They usually won't hold up for utility or enthusiast use.

I do remember one bike shop customer of mine who was putting a lot of miles on his department store bike. He would do 50 mile rides on it in cutoffs and flip-flops. No water bottle for him; he would just stop at convenience stores for drink or in a pinch get a drink from an outside faucet at someone's house. We kept fixing his bike; we usually raided our used parts bins to keep him rolling without spending more than his bike was worth. Even though we all made fun of Freds deep down we liked anyone who actually rode their bike even their bike wasn't pretty. We did finally talk him into buying a new bike and he choose the absolute bottom of the line bike we sold with steel rims and parts.

Do bikes have lifespans? Professional bike racers get new gear all the time. Steel has what metallurgists call fatigue limit. As long as the steel isn't stressed beyond its fatigue limit it should last forever assuming it doesn't rust away. Aluminum doesn't have a fatigue limit which means that any stress no mater how small takes a little life off the frame. Because of this aluminum frames are over-designed so they should still last longer than their owners would car to ride them. Klein famously designed their aluminum frames to last 1,000,000 miles. Titanium may be the best of all because like steel it has a fatigue limit so a well designed frame should never break from fatigue and being titanium it will never rust.

Hard to say how long carbon fiber frames will last. Carbon fiber can be designed to be much stronger and stiffer than other materials so they can be built both lighter and stronger. Carbon fiber failures are generally from manufacturing defects or from internal delamination from earlier impacts. Impacts that appear to have caused no damage could in fact cause invisible internal damage that will cause a failure later. Since carbon fiber can fail catastrophically riders are wise to replace it after heavy accidents even if it seems fine. Contrast this with steel that has a gradual failure mode where it usually creaks and/or rides differently well before it fails. It is not necessary to replace a steel frame after an accident because if it does fail it won't shatter underneath them.

LYDIAJW1's Photo LYDIAJW1 Posts: 51
8/29/10 2:17 P

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Yesterday I went mountain bike riding with a friend who rides a '95 Schwinn. He also owns a Trek, but said his Schwinn is better on the trails. Maybe the older models were better made than they are now. But I'd try WONGERCHI's suggestion to have it checked by a bike shop for assembly problems before giving up on the bike.

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JONBOYR700 Posts: 68
8/27/10 12:48 P

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A wise man once told me (bike shop owner): "if you take proper care of a bike, it will last as long as you want it to". I'm sure he meant that if your bike is a common name brand (Cannondale, Trek, Giant, etc, etc, etc) - not something extremely cheap from K-mart.

I had a Panasonic Dx-200 I wish I never sold. It would be cool to have a bike with down tube shifters now. LOL.

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8/27/10 8:21 A

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Thanks for all the great suggestions! I'll let him know.

Tiffany

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KITTY1970's Photo KITTY1970 Posts: 5,005
8/26/10 11:28 P

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I have a bike I purchased @ Target for $50.00 about 4 yrs. ago. I've used it off & on. Road here & their & the only problems I've had so far is back brakes don't exactly work right & the back wheel needed tighting. I don't worry so much about the bike but I have a great lock for it & I store it in the shed so it doesn't get rained on. Next year I'm thinking about purchasing a new bike only b/c they are building a paved bike path real close to me & that's what my husband & I want to do a lot next year. It's @least a 20 mile path.

P.S. You should check out the warranty on it. Usually K-Mart has a 90 day warranty.

Edited by: KITTY1970 at: 8/26/2010 (23:34)
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TENISWHIZ's Photo TENISWHIZ SparkPoints: (35,893)
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8/26/10 5:14 P

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Crella offered an EXCELLENT idea.... For the amount of riding your boyfriend does, he'd be better off spending the $150 on a good quality USED bike.

Craigslist.com, might be a good place.... But I'd visit some bike shops and look around, try them on, get some feedback from the staff first, just to get educated what's out there. Then, if money is an issue, search local papers or online sites for a used version of his favorite bike.

My sister in law and her husband bought department store bikes. They live in AZ and when we fly out there to visit, I borrow one just to keep my legs in bike shape, but honestly...it's a joke! The bike is really not good at all!

Hope this info helps.

Edited by: TENISWHIZ at: 8/26/2010 (17:15)

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SLEAUXRUNNER's Photo SLEAUXRUNNER Posts: 1,064
8/26/10 1:45 P

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I agree with Wongerchi. I cringe when people I know say they just got a new bike from K or Wal-mart. I got my first hard-tail, a KHS with no thrills, for the same price as I would have spent on a new wally world bike. It's 5 years old and all I have ever had to do is air tire and oil the chain.

I suggest two things to your boyfriend WHEN he goes to the bike shop:
1. ask them if they know anyone with a used started bike for sale. I bought my son a used Trek for $150 last year for christmas - a way better bike than schwinn.
2. ask about bike maintenance. One of the shops in my area offers a class for $10 to teach new riders how to change tubes and do routine maintenance. (Anything with pieces-parts requires maintenance)

If he rides everyday, it's well worth it to put in the extra time to take care of the bike.

Oh, and a little story. Several years ago I did an MS150 ride with a small group of friends. I "won" the award of most blow tubes - 5 in one day. I used all my spares and those of 2 others!! Flats and blow tubes are expected :)

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WONGERCHI's Photo WONGERCHI Posts: 3,889
8/26/10 1:37 P

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Sorry to say but that's what happens when you buy a K-Mart bike - you gets what you pays for. All those fixes are assembly error (but if you've not been pumping up the tires then the flat tire is user error).

Get him to take the bike into a specialist bike shop and get them to fix it.

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TRAVELISMYGAME's Photo TRAVELISMYGAME SparkPoints: (57,275)
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8/26/10 1:22 P

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The boyfriend purchased a Schwinn Riverside Cruiser from Kmart on sale for around $150 about 2 months ago. He rides nearly every day, sometimes up to 15 miles a day. Within the past week he's had serveral problems with the bike. The seat was very squeaky, so he WD40'd it and part of it slipped inside itself and was unfixable. Then one of the bolts from the chain guard fell off and had to be replaced. Then today his tire was completely flat. Seems to me that a bike should last a bit longer than 2 months even with everyday riding.

What are your thoughts/opinions? Thanks!

Tiffany

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