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KJEANNE's Photo KJEANNE SparkPoints: (39,576)
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5/2/07 3:36 P

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Well, if a metric century counts, I have already completed one this year. That was February. The Mardi Gras Century in beautiful Ventura, CA. Lots of climbing on that one. I have a few more metric centuries planned for the next few months then will ease into a 100-mile century in August, right before the big ride for San Francisco to Los Angeles. That ride is late September.

Do not look where you fell, but where you slipped.
African proverb


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KEVING10's Photo KEVING10 Posts: 297
5/2/07 10:19 A

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Rupert ID! I didn't know that they know what bikes are there. I grew up in Nampa. I am riding the Tour De Cure in June in Brigham City Utah. But there are similar rides for the Tour De Cure all across the US. It is for Diabetes. It is a great supported ride and one that if you want to try a century it is a good one to do. They have supported stops about every 10-15 miles, which allows you to take in some food, liquid or just rest. They also feed lunch in the middle of the ride.

Trying to get going again after falling off the weight loss wagon!!



 
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SKIGEEK's Photo SKIGEEK Posts: 580
5/2/07 12:29 A

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I'm hitting a century in Rupert, ID on May 19th. Get this... supported ride with no entry fee. It's part of their centenial celebration. It makes it hard to pay much for rides after that. :-)

I'll put a plug in for Yellowstone Nat. Park too. I went there for my first ride of the season a couple weekends ago; the last weekend before it opened to cars. It was free to ride/walk in, and was sooo beautiful with loads of wildlife (lotsa wild elk and buffalo). Old Faithful is closed due to awaking hungry grizzlies, but you can make a closed-vehicle route out-and-back of almost exactly 100 miles from the west park enterence to Mammoth Hot Springs at the northwest of the park.

Note that it is at a relatively high altitude for most people... something you may want to take into account.
http://www.gmap-pedometer.com/?r=832572
The above link also has an elevation profile you can enable, but isn't on by default.

Edited by: SKIGEEK at: 5/2/2007 (00:30)
~Jeff
'What better place than here? What better time than now?' -RATM
SW:185 GW:~165 - succeeded
ABIKER's Photo ABIKER Posts: 981
5/1/07 11:56 P

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Time to dig up an old topic. I saw someone ask about century rides, so here it is! Anyone have any centuries planned for spring or early summer?

I've got a group ride on June 10th planned, which might be my first century of the year. That's only if I can get a lot more riding in between now and then.

~~Adam~~ abiker.blogspot.com
'08 cycling : 0/1500 miles
'08 running: 446/1500 miles



KJEANNE's Photo KJEANNE SparkPoints: (39,576)
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12/16/06 7:55 P

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The century is in Ventura, CA. Itís the Mari Gras Century so there are opportunities to dress up me and my bike for prizes. My husband will be joining me and I will ride my recumbent. BTW I named my recumbent Zonkers, you know, like screaming yellow zonkers. Hereís the link for the ride: http://www.active.com/event_detail.cfm?eve
nt_id=1374017
My husband and I did get a training ride in this morning. I plotted a 43 mile ride on BIM and we took off at 6:30. We left early because rain was predicted for this afternoon. We had some technical difficulties but made it down to Long Beach (@12 miles) and decided that we both werenít up for a 40 mile ride today: tired and getting over a lousy cold. So we agreed on the changes we would make to the route. Of course when we pulled into the driveway at home and checked our mileage we had rode 40 miles!


Do not look where you fell, but where you slipped.
African proverb


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DRC2205's Photo DRC2205 Posts: 8,845
12/16/06 4:59 P

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Great goal with the Century in February KJEANNE. Where is the ride?

Also, does anyone know how long of a ride it is from Miami to Key West? I've always wasnted to do that unsupported. Although I think 7 Mile Bridge would freak me out...


ABIKER's Photo ABIKER Posts: 981
12/15/06 7:51 P

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way to go KJeanne. Is this going to be on the recumbent?

BTW have you named the new bike yet?

I'm looking forward to doing at least one century and one metric century next year. I've also mapped out a century route and am considering doing one unsupported. we'll see.

~~Adam~~ abiker.blogspot.com
'08 cycling : 0/1500 miles
'08 running: 446/1500 miles



LOGHOUSE's Photo LOGHOUSE Posts: 1,672
12/15/06 2:06 P

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I've done a bunch of century's (3 this past summer), though I've never done one as an organized ride. I typically load up my bike bag with a couple apples, some spending money (for food, etc.), repair stuff (patches, co2 filler, tools - all of which I've had to occasionally use), a full 100 oz water bag, and cell phone (just in case). I also bring appropriate maps and suntan lotion. Then (after roughly planning a route and letting my wife know I'll be gone for the day and about where I'll be), I just take off. I've ridden all over southeastern Wisconsin this way and aside from the centuries have done loads of 50, 60, 75, and 80 milers, and almost always ride through little towns where I can re-supply with water and food if need be. I agree with the prior poster that if you get in a few 50 to 75 milers, a century is easily within your reach. As for training for a century, I never did. I just decided after a 50 miler that I could go farther. Same after 75. Then after 80, I thought "I can make 100 for sure", and it was no problem.
Not bad for an overweight, middle aged, untrained clydsdale, aina?
I guess my point is, if you think you can do it, you probably can.
I'm not the fastest, but I can ride all day . . .
Rick

Edited by: LOGHOUSE at: 12/15/2006 (14:07)
life is too short for light beer, poor fitting shoes or cheap tools . . .

If you're one of the "Politically Correct and Perpetually Offended"- hey, life is tough . . . get a helmet.


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KJEANNE's Photo KJEANNE SparkPoints: (39,576)
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12/15/06 11:31 A

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I am training for a Century in February 2007. I have planned a 40 mile training ride for tomorrow.

Do not look where you fell, but where you slipped.
African proverb


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SKIGEEK's Photo SKIGEEK Posts: 580
9/23/06 6:54 P

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Yeah... 100km is cool too. I was just being a punk. :-) A 100km ride is nothing to sneeze at.

Ride on! :-)

~Jeff
'What better place than here? What better time than now?' -RATM
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DRC2205's Photo DRC2205 Posts: 8,845
9/23/06 5:37 P

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KELOWNAGIRL, very good point! I know we have some 150 milers locally, too.

KELOWNAGURL's Photo KELOWNAGURL Posts: 523
9/23/06 5:28 P

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Metric centuries make sense when you live in countries that use the metric system :) We all want to do 100 of something! After 100km, my next goal would be 200km.

As for not getting lost - we don't seem to have any organzed rides so I just ride 50 km away from home and then turn around and go back. :)



It's never too late to be who you might have been.

Weight goal: 115-120 lbs May 1, 2012?

Check out my blog and podcast for beginning triathletes!
kelownagurl.com


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DRC2205's Photo DRC2205 Posts: 8,845
9/23/06 5:15 P

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I have used metric cenuries as training for the full century. Yes, it is 100 K, or 63 miles. It is a little less punishing, but a good way to start.

SKIGEEK's Photo SKIGEEK Posts: 580
9/23/06 2:39 P

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Colleen, a decent time for a century is all relative for the person doing it. For a first-timer I say just finish it. A 15mph pace is good and throw in some stops for food and rest... you're looking at 8-9 hours. A decent time for people racing one is probably sub-five hours depending on the course and experience.

There are typically markings on the course, maps for the riders, and maybe even some support people to point the way. I highly recommend getting familiar with the course ahead of time. The size of the group you're with will likely depend on how many people are willing to stick with a given pace. Most that I have done start with a large pack that ends up getting widdled down to a dozen or so down to solo riders, though I recommend riding with at least one other person.

A metric centery... I dunno... what is up with that?

Advice on inclement weather cycling can be found under that topic within this cycling team forum. :-)

Ride on! :-D

~Jeff
'What better place than here? What better time than now?' -RATM
SW:185 GW:~165 - succeeded
MOMOF4GREATKIDS SparkPoints: (9,595)
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9/23/06 7:45 A

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What is a typical "decent time" for a century? Even if you average 20mph, you're still in the saddle five hours! And for me, 15mph would be more like it, maybe even less.

How do you keep from getting lost? Do you stay with a large group or just a couple riders?

WHat's the buzz about a "metric century"? I take it that 100K, or ~60 miles. I guess I could compare that to a 1/2 marathon, which I always thought was a much more reasonable, less punishing distance.

Thanks to all who are sharing their experience and knowledge. I am so stoked about cycling!

Also, does anyone have advice about how to dress for varying temps? The other day it was 51 degrees (F) when I started out, and I wore my shorts, a wicking tank and a warm, wicking jacket, a headband for my ears under my helmet and my fingerless gloves. I felt pretty comfortable the whole time, just a little chilly for the first 5 miles or so.

Colleen

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ABIKER's Photo ABIKER Posts: 981
9/19/06 11:15 P

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I think if I learned anything from this ride it was to relax and enjoy the ride, and don't treat it like a race. I got caught up with a couple of guys that were riding at speeds faster than I should've been going for the distance, and I paid for it in the last 20 miles.

I would also recommend carrying a map and a cell phone with you even if you are riding with a group and don't think you'll get separated. In the last 30+ miles of the ride there were few people on the course, and I only saw 1 sag vehicle all day. It would have totally sucked to get lost.

~~Adam~~ abiker.blogspot.com
'08 cycling : 0/1500 miles
'08 running: 446/1500 miles



COACHBEV's Photo COACHBEV SparkPoints: (5,039)
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9/19/06 4:30 P

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I posted this on a different link before I realized there was a century discussion going on here. Here it is....


Hi Colleen, welcome to the group!
I have never done a marathon and so can't compare the effort to a cycling century, but my guess is that the century is alot easier...you're sitting after all :-)

unless you really want to hammer it out (which I don't recommend), most people take stops during their ride. Organized rides have "sag support" or stops every 10-20 miles or so to refuel w/ water, sports drinks, and food (usually bananas and oranges and cookies), as well as go potty ;-) I usually skip the first stop because it is crowded and go on to the next.

For me, the biggest part of training for the long ride is learning to properly fuel and hydrate, but even more important is putting in the saddle time to train your bottom and neck/back muscles for that long of a ride.

One time for the MS 150, I actually wore TWO pair of cycling shorts the 2nd day because I was so sore because I hadn't "properly trained" my butt.

Happy Trails!
bev

"Imagine your life...and then LIVE it!"


 
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DRC2205's Photo DRC2205 Posts: 8,845
9/19/06 2:22 P

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I've completed a marathon (Mayor's Midnight Sun in Ancorage AK, 2000), a metric Century (Delaware Double Cross, 2006) and a sprint triathlon (Dewey Beach, 2004). And from my experience, I would rather do a century than face another marathon.

Yes, I agree that training for all the events was similar in terms of building mileage. Add transition practice and multiple workouts to you tri training. However, the recovery of the cycling and triathlon was significantly better than the marathon. After the marathon, I couldn't walk for a couple of days (my knees were incredibly painful) but after the century, I just reloaded on carbs, went to sleep early and was ready to get on the bike again the next day. I went for an easy 10 miles, and felt great. I could have done more, but thought that was asking for trouble!

Another tip would be to train with whatever food is a vailable event day. For cenuries, they usually have rest stops every 20 miles or so. Refill your waterbottles (I usually try to have one with water and one with Gatorade for long rides) and have something to eat (fruit, and peanut butter and jelly sandwiches are my favorite to keep me from hitting the wall).

I don't want to keep rambling, but I'd love to share anything else you think I can help with. I am looking for a standard century before the end of the season, but if not, I'll find one for the spring, before I get distracted next year!

MOMOF4GREATKIDS SparkPoints: (9,595)
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9/18/06 6:54 P

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Thanks for sharing your experience w/the century distance, Jeff. I really hope to find a ride that is of the "fun and feel good" variety that you describe, probably a flat course would fit the bill.

From what you say, the training for a century is very similar to preparing for a marathon in that a weekly long run of gradually increasing distance is the cornerstone of your training. A couple of weeks (2-3) before the race, you begin to taper off your mileage so that you have fresh legs on race day. Your last long run is 2-3 weeks before race day. The farthest I personally ever went in training was 20 miles, and I was able to finish the marathon on race day.

I read your story about "bonking" at 97 miles in a century, what a heart-breaker that had to be!

This guy, Jeff Galloway, is an olympic marathoner with real-world advice for anyone who wants to go 26.2 on foot. He's got a plan for every fitness level, and it's tried and true.

http://www.jeffgalloway.com/

I hope that helps, and thank you for the advice!

Colleen

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SKIGEEK's Photo SKIGEEK Posts: 580
9/18/06 4:57 P

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Questions from Colleen (MOMOF4GREATKIDS), "I have a question for anyone who has run a marathon, and ridden a century. How does a century ride compare, as far as effort, to running a marathon? Is it as grueling and exhausting? In a typical century ride, do you stop for breaks, or just keep riding until you are done? What kind of weekly mileage do you need to do to be properly prepared for a century?"

I haven't run a marathon, or much at all. Since they are both in an Ironman, I expect that a century is close to a marathon in effort, but will vary based on the individuals skill in one over the other. I have done centuries that were grewling and exhausting, and some that were downright fun and I felt good afterwards. Cycling typically avoids the impact, so there isn't much suffering on that end as can be the case with running. In the typical organized century rides that I've been a part of, they are organized as tours but tend to have a group that go off the front and are out to race them. Stopping is optional, but sure is nice, and most I've done have nice food stops where I like to take advantage of the time to meet other cyclists and chill out a bit. I don't think the weekly mileage is as important as getting long rides in. I think it could be done by riding one long ride per week and entending the distance each week, but riding more often is likely to help. I welcome others to chime in on the above questions.

After all this, would you care to give me any advise on technique for running, or where I could find some?

~Jeff
'What better place than here? What better time than now?' -RATM
SW:185 GW:~165 - succeeded
NEWMOMERIN's Photo NEWMOMERIN Posts: 216
9/18/06 3:59 P

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sweet! Yet another reason for a massage! I had a reall good 60 minute one when I was 9 mos preg and I felt drunk afterwords. I could barely walk! yeah baby.

I felt my muscles tighten up after my rigorous ride so I kneeded my thighs for a few minutes and I didn't feel sore there at all the next day.

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KCERIDON's Photo KCERIDON Posts: 307
9/18/06 1:52 P

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HEy everyone, the massage is a great way to finish and even, but massage of some sort (self or professional) should be part of a training regimen more so than just after an event.

I used to go to a sports massage therapist a few times a month - not candles and aromatherapy stuff, deep tissue massage. Worked on knee therapy (scar tissue) and improved running. While not for everybody, massages are great for the muscles. Learning how to kneed your own sore muscles is also a great idea.

It moves toxins, conditions muscles and like stretching, self massage muscles after strenous workouts speeds recovery. Exerting muscles creates small microtears - the building block for getting stronger, bigger muscles, it has to happen. When the body starts repairing the muscles, it throws random tissue onto it (scarring). That is what creates tightness in the muscle. Message therapy can help break that up and improve muscle growth.

Go for the massage after the event- it is free after all. Get them regularily if you can afford them, but from a sports therapy. If you can't afford it, lear some of your own techniques. It will be great!



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"What's money? A man is a success if he gets up in the morning and goes to bed at night and in between does what he wants to do." Bob Dylan
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SKIGEEK's Photo SKIGEEK Posts: 580
9/18/06 1:12 P

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While I agree on the massage part, if you don't get to the massage, or barely do, the fun has likely been lost along the way. I recommend gradually working up to the 100 mile distance to get your body used to the time in the saddle. Once you've done 70+ miles and have a few 50+ mile rides behind you, you should be set for the 100.

After body conditioning comes body fueling. Make sure you figure out how much to eat and drink along the way. I rode a 97 mile ride this year. I absolutely couldn't do three more miles because I had totally bonked in the last five miles due to not eating enough. Those last five miles were NOT FUN, and not getting the three remaining miles was NOT FUN either. A PowerBar at mile 85 would likely have changed everything. Some food for thought. :-)

~Jeff
'What better place than here? What better time than now?' -RATM
SW:185 GW:~165 - succeeded
KJEANNE's Photo KJEANNE SparkPoints: (39,576)
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9/18/06 12:20 P

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Bill is so right about the massage. I got a massage at the end of 6 of the days of my 8-day ride. They really made a difference. My legs were refreshed and ready for another day of riding.

Do not look where you fell, but where you slipped.
African proverb


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KCERIDON's Photo KCERIDON Posts: 307
9/18/06 10:39 A

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I admit, my interest is peaked. I am thinking I might do a century next year.

I plan to start racing outriggers (OC1 and OC6) next year and do a tri in June plus some swims - so I am not sure how it fits in. The tri is early season (first weekend of June). It is motivation to train with intensity during paddling off season. The swims aren't difficult as long as I put a mile 1-2x per week. So, I am not sure how a century fits in, but I don't get the anxiety about 100miles of riding that I get about 3.5 miles of running.

Now, I need to get my fall and winter training schedule together.

=====================================
"What's money? A man is a success if he gets up in the morning and goes to bed at night and in between does what he wants to do." Bob Dylan
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SKORHEIM03 Posts: 34
9/18/06 9:33 A

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Being a veteran of several 100 milers, the best advice I can give has nothing to do with the ride itself but what to do afterwards - Make sure you get a massage after the ride. Many of the rides I have done had some massage therapists on hand for free or very cheap. Without the massage, my legs were stiff and sore. With the massage, my legs felt great the next day, almost like I didn't ride at all.

Good luck to all who go for it

Bill


you snooze, you loose!


 
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SKIGEEK's Photo SKIGEEK Posts: 580
9/18/06 7:42 A

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This topic area is for discussions about riding the big, one, double zero. I'm no expert, but I've managed to complete a few of these long rides, and I know others around this team have done the same, so hopefully we can be of some help for those wanting to attain this illustrious achievement.

If you have questions or tips, please chime in. :-)

For women, KELOWNAGIRL recommended looking for more info at the following URL:
http://forums.teamestrogen.com/index.php

Edited by: SKIGEEK at: 9/18/2006 (07:43)
~Jeff
'What better place than here? What better time than now?' -RATM
SW:185 GW:~165 - succeeded
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