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PUDGERAIDER's Photo PUDGERAIDER Posts: 150
7/14/09 12:44 A

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Giant-steps

That could very well be the sound I was hearing. I've been taking it easy on the bicycle the past few days out of paranoia that I'm going to hurt my ride. If it happens again tomorrow morning I'll let you know.

Thanks everyone for the great tips, btw!

My tires don't even have that much pressure that they're rated for. I just have the same old 700c tires that I had when I got my bicycle nearly two years ago that are rated for 60-80 psi, and I ususally inflate them to about 70 or 75, so I don't think that'll be a problem for me.

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WONGERCHI's Photo WONGERCHI Posts: 3,889
7/13/09 1:51 P

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GIANT-STEPS:
Amen to that. My "crappy road" tires are 25mm Contis and inflating them to 95f/100r smooths out the ride immensely, with nary a change in speed. Once I burn through my stock of 23mm Michelins I'm switching to 25s all round.

In God we trust, all others bring data.
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If God invented marathons to keep people from doing anything more stupid, the triathlon must have taken Him completely by surprise.
-P.Z. Pearce

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The plural of "anecdote" is not "data".
- Frank Kotsonis


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GIANT-STEPS SparkPoints: (65,300)
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7/13/09 1:42 P

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Many cyclists believe higher tire pressure means less rolling resistance. This is generally true but there is very little difference in rolling resistance between 100 psi and 160 and at competitive speeds rolling resistance is only a fraction of total friction (aerodynamic drag being the largest element).

The main concern cyclists should have is to have enough cushion to prevent pinch flats. At my present weight (270 lbs) I would have to ride 23mm clinchers at very high pressure to avoid pinch flats. I generally ride 28mm tires inflated 110 rear 100 front. When I ride 25mm tires I up the pressure to 130/115. I figure I have no business riding tires narrower than 25mm until I drop a lot of weight!

One of the advantages of sewups was near immunity from pinch flats. We could ride sewups at a lower pressure for a plush ride.

Tire pressure has more to do with rider comfort than frame material. Many people claim that carbon fiber frames are much more comfortable than other materials but the difference in compliance between different frame materials is small compared to the difference in changing tire pressure 10psi. If you want your bike to be more comfortable over bumps than buy wider tires and ride lower pressures.

GIANT-STEPS SparkPoints: (65,300)
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7/13/09 1:22 P

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I wouldn't worry too much about temperatures increasing tire pressure. Every 10F degree increase in temperature only increases tire pressure a few percent. The maximum inflation pressure on tires has a generous safety margin.

I do know a few cyclists who blew out tires when they rode on freshly laid asphalt but the asphalt could have easily been over 200F.

I'll also add that it is not necessary to deflate tires when you fly. 1 atmosphere is 14.5 psi. Even if you went from sea level to the vacuum of space your tires would only increase pressure by about 15 psi.

Being in Texas I've ridden many times over 100F. I noticed a "kissing" sound when I ran over tar strips caused by the tar sticking to my tire then being pulled away. Is that the sound you heard?

Edited by: GIANT-STEPS at: 7/13/2009 (13:23)
WONGERCHI's Photo WONGERCHI Posts: 3,889
7/13/09 1:22 P

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PUDGERAIDER:
I don't do anything differently in the heat. If it's dry, I only lube chains etc when they start to chirp - there is no need to overlube!

Similarly, there is no need to inflate tires to the max either. You get much more comfort and absolutely no loss in speed if you drop the pressure. I ride 23mm Michelin tires which are rated to 120psi at 105 front/110 rear and like it a lot.

In God we trust, all others bring data.
- W. Edwards Demings

If God invented marathons to keep people from doing anything more stupid, the triathlon must have taken Him completely by surprise.
-P.Z. Pearce

Specificity, specificity, specificity.
-Andy Coggan

The plural of "anecdote" is not "data".
- Frank Kotsonis


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TRAILTRIPPER's Photo TRAILTRIPPER SparkPoints: (15,688)
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7/13/09 8:41 A

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I am not sure about doing anything different lube wise. Someone else will have to answer that.
Something to watch out for...If you have your bike locked up in the car during a hot day(such as a ride when you get out of work)watch the tire pressure. Chances are it will be greater.

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PUDGERAIDER's Photo PUDGERAIDER Posts: 150
7/13/09 12:54 A

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Ah! All this is good to know! Anyone know if any additional lubrication is needed in the dry, dry heat?

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MAGELLAN1's Photo MAGELLAN1 Posts: 550
7/12/09 12:57 P

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i am told (by my boyfriend) that the noise you hear is bubble popping as you ride over the tar. sometimes there is water in them, but usually air.

he says dont over inflate the tires, the hot sun can increase the pressure and pop them. don't inflate the tires to the max amount.

interesting..

Edited by: MAGELLAN1 at: 7/12/2009 (12:58)


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SHIVASHIVA's Photo SHIVASHIVA Posts: 154
7/12/09 11:02 A

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I don't think it's pavement melting/popping. When I have experienced this noise, my deduction was that it's the little tiny pieces of gravel that are kinda sticky that get thrown around by the tires and hit the bike or the ground and that's the sound you're hearing. It has happened to me on pavement that is relatively new. Doesn't have to be brand new, but still black at least, or having small bits of rock/gravel on it.

The road can become softer in high heat, which can slow you down. But I have doubts that it'd be melting/popping. If the sun was melting rock, certainly other things would be melting as well, like your tires.

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REBCCA's Photo REBCCA SparkPoints: (255,427)
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7/12/09 10:49 A

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Dang if the pavement is popping/melting sort of it seems like that could impact tires...I look forward to informed comments on this.

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PUDGERAIDER's Photo PUDGERAIDER Posts: 150
7/12/09 1:39 A

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So I was going on a ride the other day (rather foolishly) when it was about 100 outside. As I rode along the rode I was hearing some interesting miniature popping noises. At first I was really confused, but eventually I figured out that the popping was a result of the tar in the road settling, and as my tire went over it, I was essentially removing an air bubble.

All of this got me thinking though -- how does the heat affect my bicycle? Is it significantly more rough on my ride? Which parts is it the most harsh on? Do I need to worry about my tires in the heat?

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