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TNNSMAN7's Photo TNNSMAN7 Posts: 29
1/21/09 4:24 P

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I'm a steel bike fan. Steel is real as they say. I'm embarrassed to say I have 11 bikes! 8 are steel, 2 are aluminum(both mtn bikes) and only 1 carbon.
I prefer the ride of a steel bike. Having bought many more bikes over the years than the 11 I currently own, I also prefer the price of a steel bike!
For me bikes are as bad as Lays potato chips. I can't just have one.
Joe

"Like a ten-speed bike, most of us have gears we do not use."
-- Charles Schulz


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GIANT-STEPS SparkPoints: (65,379)
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1/7/09 4:04 P

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I ran in high school Track and Field then ran for fitness the first few years of college but my knees and ankles became problematic. When I tried taking up Tennis my knees ached all the time so from here on out cycling will probably be my main activity.

I raced bicycles a few years in college over 20 years ago. My best century time was 4:35 and I broke a spoke on that ride and missed some time waiting to borrow a wheel to finish the ride. On that century the first finisher was Scott Dickson who rolled in alone at 4:20. Dickson dropped almost everyone at the 80 mile mark so I doubt I'd finish that fast if I hadn't broken a spoke but without the problem I probably would have come in some time between my time and his.

I doubt I'll ever will be in the kind of shape to ride a 4:35 century again but I've made it a goal of mine to ride a double century some day.

I still ride the same bike I rode my fast century on. In fact it is also the bike I did my first group ride on, my first rally, my first century, and my first USCF race. I've crashed that bike 9 times and have many tens of thousands of miles on it and it is still going strong. I'd like to see an aluminum or carbon fiber bike do that!

WONGERCHI's Photo WONGERCHI Posts: 3,889
1/6/09 4:39 P

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FIT2BIKE:
I run. I really like the International distance duathlons (10k run-40k bike-5k run) so I kinda have to do both running and cycling. 10k is my favourite distance in the world, but I've run one official Half Marathon and I train up to half distance regularly. Don't like running long (or cycling, for that matter) so there's no full marathons anytime soon!

I also climb a bit too for the upper body and the sheer fun of it all. And "play" volleyball for giggles.

In God we trust, all others bring data.
- W. Edwards Demings

If God invented marathons to keep people from doing anything more stupid, the triathlon must have taken Him completely by surprise.
-P.Z. Pearce

Specificity, specificity, specificity.
-Andy Coggan

The plural of "anecdote" is not "data".
- Frank Kotsonis


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FIT2BIKEIT's Photo FIT2BIKEIT Posts: 20
1/6/09 2:23 P

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Hey WONGERCHI,

It was some life-changing experience, tell you. About the bike, I'd feel safer 'mentally', if I started out on a ride with a new bike (928 Centaur), rather than have a feeling the 928 Veloce might be compromised during a ride. I had the 8i computer switched to the Centaur and had an 11i (wired) computer put on the Veloce, which is on the Cycleops trainer. Today I rode 5 miles in 20 min.! How time flies when you're having fun!

On the road I could burn 3700 calories in a 2 1/2 miles ride easily. After the accident I had no choice but literally sit around for about a month and a half. December brought on some activity, mainly a lot of Anatomy Stretching, some beginner Pilates moves and lifting 3 or 5lb dumbells. Today was the first day I felt like doing 2 hours of Pilates, covering all but 2 of the beginner moves and integrating 3 of the intermediate exercises. I also did 20 reps (all bicep curls, 4 different ways) or 5lb, then using 8lbs, 10 reps. Some lifting exercises I can't do because my left shoulder doesn't want to cooperate!

What else do you do to keep fit besides cycling?

everything dances rhythmically til eternity...


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WONGERCHI's Photo WONGERCHI Posts: 3,889
1/6/09 10:59 A

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FIT2BIKE:
Sorry to hear about your run-in with the car, that sucks. Saying that though, if your frame looks OK - inspect VERY carefully, then you're probably safe to ride it. What tends to happen with carbon is that there is some suspicious sounds that occur just before something is going to break - a friend of mine had this weird creaking noise on his seatpost before the clamp broke off...

I ride Alu/carbon blends - my cross bike has carbon forks while my roadbike has carbon forks and seatstays - I've wiped out countless times doing cyclocross and the forks are still totally solid.

Of course if you don't feel safe, then the trainer is a good place to put the bike.

In God we trust, all others bring data.
- W. Edwards Demings

If God invented marathons to keep people from doing anything more stupid, the triathlon must have taken Him completely by surprise.
-P.Z. Pearce

Specificity, specificity, specificity.
-Andy Coggan

The plural of "anecdote" is not "data".
- Frank Kotsonis


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FIT2BIKEIT's Photo FIT2BIKEIT Posts: 20
1/5/09 6:10 P

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Thanks for the comparisons Giant. I hadn't realized all of the facts concerning Aluminum. I had read about Carbon, concerning unseen failures. That's why I replaced the 928 Veloce after my accident (hit by a car). Even though the bike shop said it didn't appear to be anything wrong, one never knows, especially after an impact with the pavement. (I'm talking about the bike, not me, though.....) I felt safer with the bike up on an indoor trainer than pedaling it on the road.

everything dances rhythmically til eternity...


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GIANT-STEPS SparkPoints: (65,379)
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1/5/09 11:48 A

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Great bikes can be made from any material, steel, aluminum, titanium, carbon etc. It turns out to be an engineering exercise how to best utilize the strengths and weaknesses of each material.

Steel frames have been perfected over the last century and improved over the years with better alloys and refined shapes and sizes. Steel frames will never be as light as the lightest aluminum or carbon frames but modern tubing can come within a stone's throw. Steel is a material that has a "fatigue limit" meaning that a well designed steel frame will not wear out. As long as the stresses are below the fatigue limit the frame could last forever (assuming it will be protected from rust). Many steels have an elongation (amount the steel can deform before breaking) of about 10%. This allows steel frames to bend instead of break. Most steel alloys can be cold set (bent back) after a crash though a few of the highest strength steel alloys can't. Also, broken or damaged tubes on brazed steel frames can be replaced which is usually impossible with other materials. The cost of a tube replacement is high enough that it generally isn't a consideration in any but the highest end steel frames though.

Aluminum is weaker and more flexible than steel so to compensate tubes are generally larger in diameter and thicker. Since aluminum is much lighter than steel an aluminum frame can be lighter even with more material. Unlike steel aluminum does not have a fatigue limit. Any use will cause wear on the frame. Aluminum frames are designed with a certain lifetime in mind. Klein used to engineer their aluminum frames to last 1,000,000 miles because it was assumed that nobody would ever ride them that much. Even though aluminum frames do have a limited lifetime a well designed frame will last longer than you will probably ride it. Generally aluminum frames can not be safely bent so any crash that is severe enough to bend a tube means the frame must be replaced.

Titanium is between steel and aluminum in both strength and density. Many people feel that titanium frames combine the best qualities of aluminum and steel frames. The strength of titanium varies a great deal in different alloys. The commercial pure titanium used in early bike parts was not nearly as strong as the alloys currently being used. Much of titanium's reputation for breaking came from early attempts of using it with poor alloys. Titanium was also prohibitively expensive until the end of the cold war when aerospace spec alloys and tubes became available for other uses (e.g. bicycles). Titanium also has the advantage that it does not rust (one of steel's weaknesses).

Carbon fiber is a composite material. It is made from insanely strong carbon fibers and a plastic or resin to hold it together. An interesting quality of carbon is that it can be assembled to have more directional strength and/or stiffness in one direction than another. For example, a bicycle frame can be designed with additional stiffness against side-to-side motion of the bottom bracket for efficiency but more vertical compliance for comfort. One of the drawbacks of carbon fiber is that internal damage to the fibers may not be visible. Failures of carbon parts can also be catastrophic; the part may seem to work perfectly up to the point where it fails suddenly with no warning. Because of this carbon fiber frames and parts are usually designed to be much stronger than they need to be and often other materials are added to the composite that aren't as strong as carbon but are more resilient.

There are good and bad bikes make with each material. Personally I'm a fan of steel. I've been riding steel frames for over 40 years and am used to the way they feel. I've ridden great aluminum and carbon frames but to me something just seems missing on them. Steel just seems to have a liveliness that seems to be missing on aluminum and carbon frames.



Edited by: GIANT-STEPS at: 1/5/2009 (11:54)
WONGERCHI's Photo WONGERCHI Posts: 3,889
1/5/09 11:24 A

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Carbon? I'm a take-it-or-leave-it kind of person. I test rode a fair number of carbon bikes last year and while they are VERY comfortable, I personally like a bit of "road buzz" rather than the smooth carpet ride that a full carbon frame gives.

I don't really see the point of carbon bits (stem, seatpost, handlebars etc) however. My roadbike came stock with a carbon stem and seatpost which I swapped out for alu ones to get the fit right. I don't feel a difference at all.

Carbon wheels though - now you're talking. Shame they cost so much!

In God we trust, all others bring data.
- W. Edwards Demings

If God invented marathons to keep people from doing anything more stupid, the triathlon must have taken Him completely by surprise.
-P.Z. Pearce

Specificity, specificity, specificity.
-Andy Coggan

The plural of "anecdote" is not "data".
- Frank Kotsonis


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BEVPRESLEY's Photo BEVPRESLEY SparkPoints: (131,502)
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1/5/09 9:14 A

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Welcome to the team. DH and I have a Santana Sovereign Tandem road bike and a Nashbar Tandem mountain bike. He also has a Trek 2100 road bike, a single mountain bike (can't remember brand) and he got me a Windsor Cliff single mountain bike for Christmas. If it ever stops raining I will get to ride it. We have clips on the road bikes, but as I am new to the mountain bike I don't have them on yet. We now own more bike clothes than we do street clothes. We ride sometimes twice a day in the summer and take the camper and do 3 day rides as often as we can. We have been some great places and met some of the nicest people on rides, it is just a great way to spend a weekend.

beverly

One Day at a Time:
1) 10,000 steps daily
2) fruit & vegie at every meal and log
3) aerobic or strength train every day
4) 7 hours sleep daily
5) check in with SP daily

My resolutions for Nov are
1) track nutrition daily
2) 30 min of exercise daily
3) finish cleaning sewing room


_______

It's never too late to be what you m


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MRSSUZSTAR's Photo MRSSUZSTAR SparkPoints: (53,386)
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1/5/09 6:50 A

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I can't say much but we don't have a lot of special gear that we use for the bikes. We have bike shorts we bought at Academy for very little. I don't have clips or shoes for my bike because I don't have my new bike yet. My hubby does for his Cannondale. My current bike is steel, my Cannondale that I'm getting is not. My hubby's Cannondale and my daughter's Specialized are both lighter than mine but I keep up with them and get a great ride. We are completely mountain bike right now but at some point we will get road bikes as well.

Suzan

Recommitted and re-energized to get back in shape!

Proud team moderator for Catholic Moms Team

I care for rare - Sophia is rare!


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KESTREL500's Photo KESTREL500 Posts: 1,173
1/4/09 11:30 P

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I have ridden across the USA several times on a steel frame and several times on a carbon frame (San Francisco to Boston)

On my Terry Symetry steel frame the ride was very comfortable and stable while the ride on my Kestrel (Carbon frame) was faster and more responsive.

That being said I am getting ready to order a custom Seven titanium bike. I have heard that they can make them ride the anyway you want them to...well of course they can't put everything into one bike but pretty darn close. I'll let you know how that goes.

As for other gear I have so much of all types but I think it is whether or not the particular item is comfortable that makes it better not the cost or what its made of except for the fact that what its made of may play into whether or not it is comfortable.

I ride in sandals (yes with clips) until at least October (sometimes with socks)I live in NYC so it gets too cold after that but I don't find that I need fancy shoes. My diadora touring shoes are fine.

I need to get my trainer hooked up as well thanks for reminding me.

Welcome to Spark people and keep the rubber side down. Feel free to sparkmail me if you want to ride across country and have the time of your life!!!

My mantra: Exercise frequently! Eat reasonably!


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FIT2BIKEIT's Photo FIT2BIKEIT Posts: 20
1/4/09 11:15 P

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Hey,

I'm new to this list, but after reading other peop's entries, find it interesting and a lot of info to be had. I was wondering if anybody has carbon gear and how they liked or disliked it?

I'm new to biking as of April 2008 and have accumulated a trio of bikes. One is a Trek Soho 4.0 Platinum Hybrid and the other two are Bianchi C2C 928 bikes, a 2008 Veloce and 2009 Centaur. Both have Campanolo components, the Centaur has a mix, mostly Centaur components, but a few Veloce. The Centaur is also a carbon monocoque bike. At first I didn't see much difference in the frame, but when I held both bikes in each hand, felt a difference in weight. The Veloce is 17 pounds and the Centaur 15. It felt like a big difference, even though only a 2 pound variance. I'm not doing any riding til my fractured scapula is all better, which happened 3 months ago. However, the carbon factor helps out. I also have a Specialized S-Works 'Milram' carbon helmet and same brand 'Expert' carbon shoes. The helmet has wider vents and is designed in the back to evacuate the air more swiftly. But for winter riding, a beanie underneath is suggested, since the helmet is a virtual windtunnel! The shoes are light and have recessed clips. I had Shimano on the Veloce, liked them, so had the same put on the Centaur. My Trek has clipless pedals. On a road bike, the clip is important so you lift the heel in addition to using the other part of your foot. It is also good on the Cycleops trainer. There's an exercise involving turning one the wheel with one foot, which requires shoes with clips or else 'no can do'. It was really cold this week so picked up Goretex bib-tights, Goretex gloves and a Specialized jacket. I had on a Specialized tee shirt, so wore the armwarmers and I was nice and toasty. The carbon shoes are very 'airy' so I needed covers, which were inexpensive 'Sidetraks'. I've spent about $12,000.00 on my hobby this year, but cycling IS a great hobby and worth every penny spent!

everything dances rhythmically til eternity...


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