Author: Sorting Last Post on Top ↓ Message:
JULESGL's Photo JULESGL Posts: 9,609
10/13/08 12:23 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Thanks for the reminder! I think I got backwards on this principle for this marathon round....

Live like no one else, so later you can LIVE like no one else

"No man in the wrong can stand up to a man in the right who keeps on a-comin." - Texas Rangers

Dare to be a Linchpin - Seth Godin


 Pounds lost: 6.0 
 
0
9
18
27
36
LDJONE2 Posts: 71
10/13/08 10:57 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I agree entirely with the idea of fueling up before, during, and after a ride. But I think that the particulars vary widely from one person to the next. I find that I do best when I eat a light to moderate meal with some complex carbs 1-2 hours before riding. Then, if I'm going to ride for 2 hours or less, I'm fine if I don't eat during the ride. But, if I'm going to be out for over 2 hours, I need to eat about 100 cals at 1.5 hours and about 100 cals every half hour or so after that until I get close to the end of the ride. But... it doesn't work exactly the same for other folks I know and/or ride with.

I'm not a big fan of gels - they give me a queasy stomach - so I would rather eat half a banana or a half of a PBJ sandwich or something like that. But on really long rides, I often carry a gel or two to stave off an impending bonk if needed.

I trade off water and sports drink on my longer rides. Also - if it's hot, I add a little salt (usually one of those prepackaged little envelopes) to each water bottle of drink. Several in-the-know folks have told me that there's just not enough salt in any of the commonly available drinks.

I have noticed that somewhere out there past 60 miles or so is sort of a zone of uncertainty where all the things you have done or failed to do over the last week or two come back to bite you in the b*tt. I've even seen highly experienced long distance riders run out of gas on long events once in a while and have to ride the sag wagon back in... Better to do that than to do damage to yourself by continuing too long and too far past your point of endurance.


 
0
9
18
27
36
LILLIAN364's Photo LILLIAN364 SparkPoints: (0)
Fitness Minutes: (40,001)
Posts: 2,308
10/12/08 1:42 P

Send Private Message
Reply
I did over 30 miles today. I didn't eat breakfast before. Oops. I ate an ounce of candy at the turn around point. I felt so weak most of the ride up. About 20 minutes after eating the candy, I had more energy. I had plenty of energy to get home.

I did the same trail a few days ago, but I had a small breakfast before. It gave me enough energy to do the whole thing.

Maintenance range. 127 to 132.

LIfe should not only be lived, it should be celebrated! (Osho)


 current weight: 135.3 
 
138
135.25
132.5
129.75
127
WYLDMOONWOMAN's Photo WYLDMOONWOMAN Posts: 489
10/12/08 9:52 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I eat cliff gels on my bike and drink one bottle of sugar free g2 each 20 miles in addition to a ton of water and it has definitely helped me with my energy...not only did I get really tired when I wasn't eating...I ate like a horse the entire following day and over indulged. I don't like to eat before a long ride, but the night before anything over 30 miles I might have spaghetti for dinner...eat the gels on the ride, and have a simple protein/carb meal like an egg or turkey sandwich and some fruit as soon as possible after the ride and I don't feel like a starving marvin the next day.

~Lisa~

I am bringing sexy back!

"Never had such a good time in my life before, I'd like to have it one time more...One good ride from start to end"
Grateful Dead



 Pounds lost: 23.0 
 
0
21.25
42.5
63.75
85
JHOLLNAGEL Posts: 1,768
10/11/08 11:09 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I am working on finding what gels will work with getting them down without the gagging feeling. I'm trying to work on the timing as to when tostart the liguid nutrition to keep me energized throughout the ride. I do not what to get into a yo-yo effect on the energy levels. Hence, why I will lay off on the solid energy bar unless I'm eating one on the way home from work.

I have bonked before and muscle cramped as well neither experience was pleasurable;-) LOL

But like "W" as stated in previous posts you need to eperiment with what works for you. What works for other may not necessarily be your cup of tea.

I do not even stop to go the bathroom .. I wait until the ride is over. But trust me do not get in my way of the bathroom when we get back to the LBS or home. I have been known to knock a few people down.

I'm afraid if I stop it will knock my cycling cadence out of whack.

Although, I do stop at the rest stops in a century which I find do not knock my cadence way out of whack. It usually takes about 2-3 miles into the next loop before I feel like I'm in my groove again though.

Jim

 current weight: 229.0 
 
238
226
214
202
190
SWTPRPGRL32's Photo SWTPRPGRL32 Posts: 1,758
10/11/08 9:58 A

Send Private Message
Reply
Thanks for sharing the great information!!!

~AnGiE~

I also do weight loss videos on YOUTUBE!!! CHECK ME OUT:)

www.youtube.com/swtprpgrl32


BECAUSE I'M WORTH IT!!

One day at a time.... actually.... One CHOICE at a time!





 current weight: 236.7 
 
265
238.75
212.5
186.25
160
WONGERCHI's Photo WONGERCHI Posts: 3,889
10/10/08 11:15 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
BARBARA:
I eat every hour. Or rather, I take a gel every hour. I also aim to finish a bottle of sports drink in that time too. I don't stop to eat and with gel packets taped to the toptube it's really easy - just rip off the pack and squeeze into mouth. Then follow up with a squirt of liquid and I'm good to go.

I personally couldn't eat every couple of hours as I like to keep the energy levels up - that really tired feeling is not one I like. However, whatever works for you...

In God we trust, all others bring data.
- W. Edwards Demings

If God invented marathons to keep people from doing anything more stupid, the triathlon must have taken Him completely by surprise.
-P.Z. Pearce

Specificity, specificity, specificity.
-Andy Coggan

The plural of "anecdote" is not "data".
- Frank Kotsonis


 current weight: 190.0 
 
210
202.5
195
187.5
180
BARBARA291's Photo BARBARA291 Posts: 250
10/10/08 8:19 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
WONGERCHI:
Thanks for the clarification! Question I have though is should a person be eating every hour or every couple hours? Or would this just be a personal preferance on how the body reacts?
I woke up to our first official frost day today - I wonder if I will be able to pull the bike out for a ride this weekend. (I'm a suck with the cold!) They are calling for snow this afternoon!

Work like you don't need the money.
Love like you've never been hurt.
Dance like nobody's watching...
Sing like nobody's listening... (oh yea!)

Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

The Big 3
March 2/08 (start)
Chest 39"
Waist 35"
Hips 40.5"

October 1/08
Chest 34"
Waist 30.5"
Hips 37"


 current weight: 138.0 
 
161
153.25
145.5
137.75
130
LILLIAN364's Photo LILLIAN364 SparkPoints: (0)
Fitness Minutes: (40,001)
Posts: 2,308
10/10/08 6:49 A

Send Private Message
Reply
I just started biking longer distances. I noticed if I bike for more than an hour and half that sometimes I get that get home and empty the frig feeling. I haven't tried eating along the way, but maybe I should.

I find when I go more than two hours on bike that I'm low on energy toward the end of my ride. I'm going to try eating only a snack and see if that makes a difference.

Eating a whole meal weighs me down and I'm probably need more glycogen toward the end of my ride so I can't go as fast if I don't eat anything. I think that it might be a good idea to pack a snack since I put off buying one on the road.

I weigh about 130 so I should aim for about 130 calories. That's a little more than an apple or a cup of grapes, but I can start with that and see if that helps.

Maintenance range. 127 to 132.

LIfe should not only be lived, it should be celebrated! (Osho)


 current weight: 135.3 
 
138
135.25
132.5
129.75
127
WONGERCHI's Photo WONGERCHI Posts: 3,889
10/9/08 5:27 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I agree with Jim's LBS nutritionist on most of these points although with gels I've never had to anticipate a half hour before. I always feel the effect after 5-10 minutes. In fact, I often take a gel a bit late (normally my second one) and then go from being kinda fatigued, to "OK, let's DO this!" With drinks I'm normally drinking about 15 mins into the ride. Happens in both cycling and running too.

I don't take real food on rides anymore. I find it a lot easier to tape gels to the toptube (or in a jersey pocket) and load up with bottles. This is probably because I don't like to get off the bike even for long rides - it ruins the flow for me. Also I needed a refueling strategy that worked for running too and there's no way I can eat solid food on the run!

However, if food works for you, then great. I'm a believer in finding a tried and trusted formula for you and sticking to it.


EDITED to add: BARBARA - you don't need 200 cal snack packs, you need 140 cals. Remember, it's 1 cal per pound of bodyweight - your ticker says that you're 140lbs so that's all you need per hour. However if you feel more comfortable with a bit more to nibble on, then that's OK. I weigh 180 but I'm happy with 200 cals (and it simplifies the math). It's really easy to overeat on the bike...

Edited by: WONGERCHI at: 10/9/2008 (17:27)
In God we trust, all others bring data.
- W. Edwards Demings

If God invented marathons to keep people from doing anything more stupid, the triathlon must have taken Him completely by surprise.
-P.Z. Pearce

Specificity, specificity, specificity.
-Andy Coggan

The plural of "anecdote" is not "data".
- Frank Kotsonis


 current weight: 190.0 
 
210
202.5
195
187.5
180
SARAHGMD Posts: 834
10/9/08 3:06 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Alternately for those of us who prefer food that looks like food, eating slowly seems to help, and being sure to eat before you need to.

 current weight: 173.0 
 
203
189.75
176.5
163.25
150
JHOLLNAGEL Posts: 1,768
10/9/08 10:40 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Hi

I would like to chime in on what the nutritionist said at my LBS on this topic and let me know if this is correct.

Gels and sports drinks are to be used during the rides because they will break down quicker and provide you with the energy stoes when you will need them. He also indicated that the calories should be consumed about a half an hour earlier than when you anticipate in needing the energy supply.

So based on what Wongerchi is stated which I believe than the cals. showed be consumed about a half into the ride for an hour long or longer ride and every half hour there after.

He said that the solid energy bars are good but you would have to consume them about an hour or so before you start your ride. It take the body more energy to break down a solid substance for energy .... since you are putting demands on your body to perform while riding .... the digestive system can not be operating at peak performance to break down the solid bar for the energy it needs to provide to the body.

When he explained this to me it made sense .... and what "W" has been professing on these blogs to eat while riding came to mind.

I know personally since I have been trying to apply this technique that I have not been bonking, I have energy to stay with the first group on our rides, I'm not as fatiqued or spent after the ride, I'm not eating everything in sight when I get home; I find a soy or whey protein shake (double batch) is plenty for me now.

I also realized when I was first on SP I was eating around 1100 cals per day ... when I realized you had to eat to lose is when I have upped the cals. Now I'm plateaued but I think it is due to my not recording what I'm eating and I'm also not exercising in a regular routine. My exercising is very sporadic. Once I get everything in a routine again is when I will re-evaluate what I need to do.

Jim

 current weight: 229.0 
 
238
226
214
202
190
BARBARA291's Photo BARBARA291 Posts: 250
10/9/08 10:20 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
This is great information!
I am planning to ring-in my 40th by riding to my cabin (not until July 09). This is a 185km bike ride. I have been researching & reading everything I can to keep the strength & endurance I've built this summer - through the winter. This tidbit is awsome! I will remember for training & the big ride to pack 200 calorie (quality) snacks to consume along the way.

Work like you don't need the money.
Love like you've never been hurt.
Dance like nobody's watching...
Sing like nobody's listening... (oh yea!)

Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

The Big 3
March 2/08 (start)
Chest 39"
Waist 35"
Hips 40.5"

October 1/08
Chest 34"
Waist 30.5"
Hips 37"


 current weight: 138.0 
 
161
153.25
145.5
137.75
130
MYVISTA's Photo MYVISTA Posts: 86
10/9/08 9:33 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Great explanation!!
Remember, the type of things you eat may also affect your health. There is the notion that when you ride you can abandon healthy choices because junk food packs more calories. You can get the same energy from eating healthy foods. Nuts, dried fruit,whole grains, protein etc. all came in healthy forms. Of course eating this way takes a little planning. I always carry a banana, a zip of nuts and raisins on the bike as a basic energy package. I ride long intense miles and these and other healthy foods fuel me very well.

Do, or Do Not.
There is no "TRY"!
....YODA

It is obvious that we cannot use the same thinking to solve a problem that we have been using to cause it.


 current weight: 154.8 
 
170
161.25
152.5
143.75
135
WONGERCHI's Photo WONGERCHI Posts: 3,889
10/9/08 9:28 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Just got RBR today and had a look at it as well. It made me smile as I've been banging on about this all year.

Fueling on the bike is essential, especially on long rides. When I started eating on the bike this year I lost the "come home and eat the fridge" attitude that I had last year. I felt better on the ride, recovered for the long run the next day, and even managed my calories! It took me a year to get over that "eating's cheating" mentality and to finally realise that you only have a certain amount of energy to see you through.

It still amazes me how people can roll out for a 2-3 hour group ride with only a couple of bottles of water. Guess who's the one sharing gels and sports drink with them for the last hour while they try and stave off the bonk? Yep, me. It also gives me a perverse feeling of satisfaction when I outsprint guys at the end of the ride because they didn't fuel properly too.

If you've been reading my drivelly posts you'll know that my golden rule for on-bike fueling is 1 cal per lb of bodyweight per hour for anything lasting an hour. For me that's 200cals, it's not a lot but makes it so much better. I prefer getting my cals via gels and sports drink but I've been known to have real food on the bike too.

So FUEL UP! You'll be a lot happier in the long run.

In God we trust, all others bring data.
- W. Edwards Demings

If God invented marathons to keep people from doing anything more stupid, the triathlon must have taken Him completely by surprise.
-P.Z. Pearce

Specificity, specificity, specificity.
-Andy Coggan

The plural of "anecdote" is not "data".
- Frank Kotsonis


 current weight: 190.0 
 
210
202.5
195
187.5
180
WYLDMOONWOMAN's Photo WYLDMOONWOMAN Posts: 489
10/9/08 9:03 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
This was in my RBR newsletter today and I wanted to share it

Eat to Lose Weight

We heard from a rider named Gus who says one reason he began cycling was to lose weight. He did well, began riding longer distances and some pounds came off. He noticed, however, that when rides got into the range of 60 miles (100 km) he was becoming exhausted and feeling lousy even after getting home.

So he asked us this: "Should I be snacking to increase overall exercise time and not feel so bad at the end? Does it make any sense to eat on the bike when I'm trying to lose weight?"

That's a great question. Why eat anything on a ride if shedding weight is a goal? It seems logical that you shouldn't. After all, weight loss is based on increasing caloric expenditure coupled with consuming fewer calories.

As in many other areas, what seems logical ain't necessarily so. Weight loss is a subject fraught with paradox. Here are 3 important reasons to eat while riding:

---You can ride longer. The more you ride, the more calories you burn. But you can't ride longer than about 2 hours before your stored glycogen (muscle fuel) is depleted. At that point you feel tired and even miserable.

But if you eat, you can ride much longer and burn substantially more calories even though you add some with on-bike snacking. Hence, the paradox: You have to eat in order to ride long enough to burn more calories.

Here's an example: Let's say you burn an average of 550 calories per hour on a ride. That's in the ballpark for many roadies. If you don't eat, you can ride 2 hours before feeling fatigued and the fun ends. That's 1,100 calories burned. But if you nibble an energy bar (225 calories) and drink a bottle of sports drink (125) along with enough water to stay hydrated, those 350 calories enable you to complete a 4-hour ride feeling pretty good. So your net loss for the ride is 1,850 calories (550 x 4 = 2,200, less 350 = 1,850). This represents just over half a pound (224 grams) of body fat.

Tip! As a safety net, carry a packet of energy gel in case you do run too low on fuel in the last hour. It'll supply about 100 calories and not upset the equation enough to matter, but it will help keep the ride fun.

---You can ride harder. Although duration is important, so is intensity. And you can't go fast unless your body has a lot of carbohydrate to burn. Bodies that exhaust their glycogen stores have to burn predominantly fat -- and fat metabolism means you can't ride hard. On the other hand, if you conserve muscle glycogen by eating carbs as you ride, you'll be able to go at a higher calorie-incinerating pace.

---Your furnace stays stoked. You don't burn calories only while riding. You burn them just by being alive. And fast riding is one of the best ways to keep your metabolic rate elevated after you get off the bike. That's when you really lose weight. It happens best after long, vigorous rides made possible by eating on the bike.

One more point: Be careful when you set weight-loss goals. It's tempting to try for extremely low body fat percentages. We tend to think of elite riders when we envision the ideal cycling body. But people who excel as pro roadies are often lean and light to begin with. The fact is, elite cyclists have chosen their parents very well.

It's unrealistic for a large-framed person who stores fat easily to achieve a pro cyclist's silhouette. It won't matter how much he or she rides and restricts calories. Instead, this rider will slow down, get exhausted and hate the bike.

Have realistic weight-loss goals. You'll get leaner, faster and climb better -- within your genetic limitations

~Lisa~

I am bringing sexy back!

"Never had such a good time in my life before, I'd like to have it one time more...One good ride from start to end"
Grateful Dead



 Pounds lost: 23.0 
 
0
21.25
42.5
63.75
85
Page: 1 of (1)  

Report Innappropriate Post

Other Cycling - Road, Mountain, Fun, Racing General Team Discussion Forum Posts

Topics: Last Post:
Tips on Riding in the Rain 11/2/2013 8:27:55 AM
Looking for a good Metric Century training plan 1/21/2014 9:39:54 PM
May Riding Challenge 6/4/2014 10:30:13 AM
Hands going numb? 5/5/2014 3:31:07 PM
136-mile cycling network above London proposed 1/4/2014 11:54:39 AM

Thread URL: http://www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/team_messageboard_thread.asp?board=0x1670x19188232

Review our Community Guidelines