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MARKA78's Photo MARKA78 Posts: 608
3/3/09 12:33 A

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Well, it's done...I've made my purchase! Perhaps things are easier in a bigger city with big bike shops that stock a lot of tri bikes, but that's just not the case around here. It was a big pile of NOTHING at the two bikes shops here. I made a trip to KC today and hit some shops. Unfortunately, there's still not a lot in stock to try out in the price range I was looking in. I was pretty well focused on getting a 2008 Felt S32 because they could still be ordered from Felt for about $1250. There just wasn't anything that could beat it in that price range. But one of the shops I visited had a used 2007 Cannondale IronmanŽ Slice Aero 3. It had only been ridden one season and traded back in for a road bike. It was the right size (which I now know is a 56) and he was offering it for $1100 (no tax since used). It felt good and shifted like a charm. Retail on it is $2099. Components are fairly comparable to the 08 Felt, but I couldn't justify spending another $200+ for it....plus I could take the Cannondale home with me :-) Can't wait to get some miles in!!

Read more - runnurmark.blogspot.com

Recent Races:
* 4/11/09 - Eisenhower Marathon (3:09:47) - BOSTON!!!
* 8/17/09 - Governor's Cup 10K (40:13)
*9/19/09 - Race Against Breast Cancer 5K (17:54)
* 10/17/09 - KC Half Marathon (1:28:50)
* 11/22/09 - Gobbler Grind HM (1:29:19)
MARKA78's Photo MARKA78 Posts: 608
2/20/09 2:17 P

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Chi, that's why I am leaning toward a tri/tt bike. I don't have any plans to do group rides or any drafting in packs. And living in Kansas, I don't have any mountains to contend with...only rolling hills. From what I've read, the body positioning of a tri bike produces significant gains when it comes to your run leg. I can't afford both types of bikes and duathlons/triathlons are the only type of competitive riding I will be doing.

Read more - runnurmark.blogspot.com

Recent Races:
* 4/11/09 - Eisenhower Marathon (3:09:47) - BOSTON!!!
* 8/17/09 - Governor's Cup 10K (40:13)
*9/19/09 - Race Against Breast Cancer 5K (17:54)
* 10/17/09 - KC Half Marathon (1:28:50)
* 11/22/09 - Gobbler Grind HM (1:29:19)
WONGERCHI's Photo WONGERCHI Posts: 3,889
2/20/09 2:06 P

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Mark:
Some other thoughts...

If you don't own a roadbike already, stay well clear. You CANNOT use a tri/TT bike in a group ride, generally because you can't get to the brakes quickly. Also, a tri/TT bike is only designed for that purpose, it doesn't climb or handle as well as a roadbike.

In God we trust, all others bring data.
- W. Edwards Demings

If God invented marathons to keep people from doing anything more stupid, the triathlon must have taken Him completely by surprise.
-P.Z. Pearce

Specificity, specificity, specificity.
-Andy Coggan

The plural of "anecdote" is not "data".
- Frank Kotsonis


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JHOLLNAGEL Posts: 1,768
2/19/09 10:18 P

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Mark

I have to agree with Wongerchi. I would offer 750 and move up to 850 .... 900 max. As previously stated it has to fit you like a glove. I would see if I can test ride it for a 20 -30 mile ride. I would see if I can remain in the aero position for at least half the distance.

Good Luck

Jim

PS When I bought my bike I test rode a Trek Madone for 30 miles and the Giant OCR. I could not really discern a difference in comfort but was able to afford the Giant. I have had only 2 rides on the new bike from the Raliegh 450 Technium I previously owned. I can hardly wait for the spring riding season to start to get back on the new bike.

Edited by: JHOLLNAGEL at: 2/19/2009 (22:21)
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WONGERCHI's Photo WONGERCHI Posts: 3,889
2/19/09 5:14 P

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Mark:
It's a bit steep for what I would pay for a 105/Ultegra bike that's 6 years old. You can get an entry-level Tri/TT bike at that price new. DA bar-end shifters are standard issue, Shimano doesn't make any others.

The upgrades are nice, although I'm not a fan of the FSA road cranks but I swear by the Thomson post (I have them on both bikes and they are bombproof.

What wheels are you getting with it? And what's your basebar - from what I can remember, the PD Stryke bars are clip-on. Profile Design makes a good aerobar though. Be aware that you may have to saddle swap regardless.

More importantly, what size is it? And will it fit you? Aero position is nice but only if you can stay there! Fit is especially important for TT/Triathlon. If it fits (like a glove) and you like it, offer $800ish...

In God we trust, all others bring data.
- W. Edwards Demings

If God invented marathons to keep people from doing anything more stupid, the triathlon must have taken Him completely by surprise.
-P.Z. Pearce

Specificity, specificity, specificity.
-Andy Coggan

The plural of "anecdote" is not "data".
- Frank Kotsonis


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MARKA78's Photo MARKA78 Posts: 608
2/19/09 4:50 P

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Need to solicite another quick bit of advice from you knowledgable folks. I'm going to go look at a used 2003 Felt S22 tri bike this weekend. The seller works at a bike shop and says it's well maintained and in great condition. Ridden for 3 seasons.

Parts -
Shifters: Durace
Derailuers: Ultegra rear, 105 front
Crankset: FSA Carbon Pro
Brakeset: 105

Upgrades - Specialized Mondo Pro foldable bead, red stripe tires; Thompson Elite Seatpost; Selle San Marco SLR gel flow saddle; Profile Design Carbon Stryke aero bars; Speedplay X-5 pedals

Asking price is $1100. No, I haven't ridden it yet, but it is out of town and I want to be prepared to purchase if it feels good on the test ride. Opinions on price/value? I've read good things about the Felt bikes and I won't find many options for a tri bike in the $1000 range.

Thanks for the input!

Read more - runnurmark.blogspot.com

Recent Races:
* 4/11/09 - Eisenhower Marathon (3:09:47) - BOSTON!!!
* 8/17/09 - Governor's Cup 10K (40:13)
*9/19/09 - Race Against Breast Cancer 5K (17:54)
* 10/17/09 - KC Half Marathon (1:28:50)
* 11/22/09 - Gobbler Grind HM (1:29:19)
REBCCA's Photo REBCCA SparkPoints: (270,082)
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2/14/09 10:47 P

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One of the best decisions I made when I bought my bikes was buying them from my LBS. They have taught me how to take care of the bike and do free adjustments when needed. I still love my Cannondale Synapse but did not want to trash it in the puddles, mud etc of Winter so got a Cannondale Quick (cross bike) a couple of months ago. It is a great ride for $500 and takes the yucky conditions in stride and makes it up the steep switchbacks with almost the same ease as my Synapse. It glides just as quick too!! I am still a beginner but do encourage LBS for the place to find your bike.

"Learn from nature: See how everything gets accomplished and how the miracle of life unfolds without dissatisfaction or unhappiness."
Eckhart Tolle



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CAMPFIREFLY's Photo CAMPFIREFLY Posts: 24
2/5/09 4:03 P

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I second the two cents. I am very pleased with the level of service I have been receiving at the shop (all the employees ride) I purchased my baby. Granted I spent $1,700 on my bike, but they got it ready for my trainer (tuned it, cleaned it and threw in a new back tire) for free, have been giving me advice about products and a heads up on sales. Also, they have offered to do an analysis of my riding come spring. It's all about relationship building. Of course, in turn, I have highly recommend them to others.

Anything can be accomplished in baby-steps!


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JHOLLNAGEL Posts: 1,768
2/5/09 3:49 P

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Mark

I would personally stay away from bikesdirect. yes you may be able to get the bikes cheaper but where will you get the support for the bike.

If you buy from one of your LBS's and develop a good rapport .... soon you will find that they may give you a heads up on some deals and if you need your bike worked on for some reason you find your bike at the top of the list being worked on and being ready when you need it for a group ride or race.

Just my 2 cents worth

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JHOLLNAGEL Posts: 1,768
2/5/09 3:45 P

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Mark

You will know what bike you want when you test ride. Also, what helped me to get a little more knowledgeable in bike buying and components was this web site from my LBS. http://www.wheelandsprocket.com/ They have a choice to choose called cycling 101. I think you will find this beneficial. They also have a classified section as well but since you are from Kansas and I'm from Wisconsin this may not work.

This gave me a wealth of knowledge as a base. Plus this LBS supports a group ride for our club each week and they also sponsor and run a cycle race every year on July 5th or the Sunday around the 4th of July.

I hope this will be beneficial to you as well.

Jim

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MARKA78's Photo MARKA78 Posts: 608
2/5/09 3:29 P

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I guess if pretty much every brand is going to be comparable at the same price point, then I'll focus on the fit more than anything. So there aren't any brands that I should really stay away from (notoriously cheesy construction, etc)? And should I be wary of internet stores such as this ( www.bikesdirect.com/products/motobec
an
e/mirage_pro09.htm
), even if I have tried the bike out in person?
Thanks for all the tips.

Read more - runnurmark.blogspot.com

Recent Races:
* 4/11/09 - Eisenhower Marathon (3:09:47) - BOSTON!!!
* 8/17/09 - Governor's Cup 10K (40:13)
*9/19/09 - Race Against Breast Cancer 5K (17:54)
* 10/17/09 - KC Half Marathon (1:28:50)
* 11/22/09 - Gobbler Grind HM (1:29:19)
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2/5/09 3:21 P

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Bikes shops vary a great deal in the quality of advise. That is one of the reasons you should search out the best shop and do your business there. Some shops will tell you total BS and say anything to sell you on something while others will steer you to the right choice even if it means less profit for them.

I've always valued shops who support cycling. It is a good sign when a shop sponsors a local race team and riding club. It is also a good sign when a shop hosts rides for cyclists at all levels.

Ask other cyclists which ship they like the best in your area.

WONGERCHI's Photo WONGERCHI Posts: 3,889
2/5/09 3:21 P

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It's fit, first and foremost. The LBSs (go to both) will be able to tell you what size (or range of sizes) fits you best. Test ride the bikes and talk to the employees to see what would suit your needs. Sometimes it's best to go home and do your research and then go back.

Frame weight is likely the least of your worries. Actually, at your budget weight won't be a concern, light components are also pretty $$$. If you're used to a full suspension MTB then you'll fly on a roadbike.

To me, it's the materials used to make the frame and the quality of the associated components that determine the value of the bike. The high-end bikes will have better quality carbon fibre than the lower ended CF bikes, for example. They'll also have better wheels, better shifting parts, etc. Most of the bikes in your budget are going to be Alu/steel(?), with low-level components. All the entry-level offerings from all the bike manufacturers will be similar.

In God we trust, all others bring data.
- W. Edwards Demings

If God invented marathons to keep people from doing anything more stupid, the triathlon must have taken Him completely by surprise.
-P.Z. Pearce

Specificity, specificity, specificity.
-Andy Coggan

The plural of "anecdote" is not "data".
- Frank Kotsonis


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MARKA78's Photo MARKA78 Posts: 608
2/5/09 3:10 P

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I am not including the pedals and shoes in the price point...just the bike. I'm not in a huge rush to pop down into aero. I've got a lot of riding to do before I'll be any good at it, but I wanted to at least have something a little lighter with no suspension so I don't waste a ton of energy each time I pedal. I certainly like the idea of getting a higher quality bike and upgrading components over time, but I'm just lost as to what I should be looking for. Same thing with checking on Craigslist, etc...I just don't have a clue about what features determine what value. Is my main concern as a beginner going to be frame weight? Should I just ask the bike shop guys and trust what they tell me? We only have two bike shops in town...think that is enough looking around?

Read more - runnurmark.blogspot.com

Recent Races:
* 4/11/09 - Eisenhower Marathon (3:09:47) - BOSTON!!!
* 8/17/09 - Governor's Cup 10K (40:13)
*9/19/09 - Race Against Breast Cancer 5K (17:54)
* 10/17/09 - KC Half Marathon (1:28:50)
* 11/22/09 - Gobbler Grind HM (1:29:19)
WONGERCHI's Photo WONGERCHI Posts: 3,889
2/5/09 2:53 P

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Mark:
Top tip - try as many bikes as possible in your price range, and even some above that. And in multiple shops too. You will get to know what size is right for you and what you like. For your budget, you're really looking at an entry-level roadbike as your best bet - you'll never get a new tri/TT bike at that price. This roadbike will be equipped with lower-level components - this isn't to say that they'll fall apart on you but they will be clunkier and slightly more finicky.

Also ask about fits too. Especially for someone new to roadbikes, a good fit is critical. However, most LBSs do not do fits well. I had an initial fit from my LBS and then went to a proper bike fitter/physio to get my position dialed in - we ended up changing a whole host of things to get me fit right. And then don't mess with the position for about a year, I'm figuring out a new saddle right now and have to sit further back so knowing what your position feels like really helps.

The fit process is doubly critical when you're aero. Don't be obsessed with being too aerodynamic, get a comfortable aero position for now and go lower in successive years.

For a $500-600 bike be prepared to drop $800, including all the accessories. You'll need bike shorts if you don't already have these. Clipless pedals too. Clip-on aerobars if you're thinking multisport. And then once you get more into this bike business, you'll want to upgrade bits... Trust me, it can get expensive in a hurry!

In God we trust, all others bring data.
- W. Edwards Demings

If God invented marathons to keep people from doing anything more stupid, the triathlon must have taken Him completely by surprise.
-P.Z. Pearce

Specificity, specificity, specificity.
-Andy Coggan

The plural of "anecdote" is not "data".
- Frank Kotsonis


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JHOLLNAGEL Posts: 1,768
2/5/09 2:35 P

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Also, I would even try and test ride a higher end bike as well. if you have a cycling club in your area ask if any one is upgrading and looking to sell their current bike. You would be surprised at the kind of deal you might fall into.

also, check into craigslist.org in your area. Once you know the size, style, and type of bike you want; you may find a great deal there as well.

Like the pp do not be afraid to buy into a higher price bike with cheaper components .... like it was already mentioned you can always upgrade later.

Jim

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2/5/09 1:54 P

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Your best tool for finding the right bike is to test ride every bike in your price range. Also consider the reputation of the shop. It is certainly a good investpent to spend a few more bucks to buy your bike from the best shop in town than a cheesy one that may not stand behind what they sell or go out of business in a few years.

I've worked in bike shops that used the Fit Kit and I considered it more a marketing tool than anything else. The one exception was the RAD tool for adjusting cleats. I loved the RAD tool but the rest of it was basically a gimick. I could do a better job fitting someone by going on a ride with them and seeing how they sit and ride their bikes. Since customers believed that we could fit them more accurately with a Fit Kit it helped us sell more bikes.

There is no perfect stem length for a given measurement; some people like to stretch out more and less than others. I never found femour length or KOPS to be that accurate for what saddle position worked best either. The Fit Kit gave an educated guess about what would work for a cyclist but often it still took fine tuning to dial it in.

$500-600 isn't a huge budget for bikes but you can get a suprisingly good riding bike in this range. Inexpensive bikes often have a few cheesy parts that will be the bike's Achele's heel until they are replaced but that is something you can do later when finances allow.

MARKA78's Photo MARKA78 Posts: 608
2/5/09 1:09 P

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I also need some advice on buying a road/tri bike. I have been getting by on an old moutain bike with dual suspension, which just won't do for competition. I'll probably be shopping in the $500-$600 range as I don't have much to spend. So I'm looking for advice on the best brands, models, and features to look for in this range. Also any tips on brands that I should stay away from would be great. Thanks in advance for your help,

Mark

Read more - runnurmark.blogspot.com

Recent Races:
* 4/11/09 - Eisenhower Marathon (3:09:47) - BOSTON!!!
* 8/17/09 - Governor's Cup 10K (40:13)
*9/19/09 - Race Against Breast Cancer 5K (17:54)
* 10/17/09 - KC Half Marathon (1:28:50)
* 11/22/09 - Gobbler Grind HM (1:29:19)
NORMAVI's Photo NORMAVI Posts: 94
1/21/09 9:05 P

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I have a triple on my hybrid that I ride to work up and down a 300 ft. escarpment and am happy with it. I have a double on my road bike and it has been fine, but once in a while I miss having that one extra lower gear. I actually have a 12 to 29 cluster on the road bike.

As for fit, I think the technical fit kits are great if you are dealing with less than experienced salespeople. Someone once sold me a frame that was too big. I bought my road bike from a man that knew right away what frame to put me on. I argued for a smaller frame, rode it for 20 mins., then tried the one he thought would work well and was surprised at how much better it fit. I belive that once one has the basic elements within a certain range of appropriate geometry, that personal preference and unitque body structures take over, and minor adjustments from the "ideal" result.

I loved the Specialized Ruby and the Cannondale Synapse, but I went with a Canadian-made Marinoni. I liked the fact that I could get carbon seat stays and rear axle drop-outs with eyelets and brazons to fit a proper rack. No other manufacturer offered that. I always like to ride with a few goodies in my pannier and extra clothing in the fall and spring weather.

A test ride should be more than a spin around a parking lot. If that's all it is, you're shopping at the wrong store.

Have fun on your new bikes!

Edited by: NORMAVI at: 1/21/2009 (21:06)
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CAMPFIREFLY's Photo CAMPFIREFLY Posts: 24
1/21/09 5:59 P

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Ahhh...a triple. And, I'm glad for it. I've needed the extra ump while riding hills!! I figured this bike is a keeper; I can always switch to a double when I become a stronger cyclist (and perhaps want to race).

Anything can be accomplished in baby-steps!


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TNNSMAN7's Photo TNNSMAN7 Posts: 29
1/21/09 4:55 P

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I'm curious about what crank you ended up with, a compact double, regular double or a triple?

"Like a ten-speed bike, most of us have gears we do not use."
-- Charles Schulz


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CAMPFIREFLY's Photo CAMPFIREFLY Posts: 24
1/6/09 9:19 P

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Hi all,

I just noticed that I did update all of you with my purchase...I bought a Specialized Ruby in July...LOVE IT! The bike shop laser fitted me to the bike; it fits like a glove! Thank you so much for all your suggestions!



Anything can be accomplished in baby-steps!


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JULESGL's Photo JULESGL Posts: 9,609
7/26/08 4:13 P

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You're going to love your road bike with all this thought you're putting into it!

Will your LBS let you take any for a short "test ride" around the block? most will let you stay in the parking lot, but if they'll let you keep it for a 10 minute ride, that would be great!

have fun

Live like no one else, so later you can LIVE like no one else

"No man in the wrong can stand up to a man in the right who keeps on a-comin." - Texas Rangers

Dare to be a Linchpin - Seth Godin


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JHOLLNAGEL Posts: 1,768
7/25/08 9:49 A

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I love the thread and I'm learning a lot. Since you all know I own a Raleigh Technium aluminum frame bike that is 20 yrs old ... The next purchased bike will probobably be my last or at least one for a while. Unless I can convince the Mrs otherwise;-) However, I still want to own a muscle car so if given the choice I'll keep the Raleigh and buy the car.

I know this may may depress a lot of you but the car has been a desire a lot longer than the desire to ride.

I have learned that I should go with what I would be riding as terrain for most of the time and not a once and a while occurence or special trip. Am I understanding this correctly?

I will be counting my teeth on my gears and letting you guys know what I have. I'm curious as to whether I should change out or upgrade.
Jim

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LDJONE2 Posts: 71
7/24/08 9:19 P

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W,

I'll second your comments agout a good fit. The way a road bike fits determines how comfortable you are after the first few minutes - which determines how hard you can go, how well you can climb, how long you can ride, etc. Much more than gearing or bike materials or a lot of other stuff. The only thing that's probably as important is getting the right saddle for your particular (or peculiar as the case may be...!!) anatomy.

 
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WONGERCHI's Photo WONGERCHI Posts: 3,889
7/24/08 4:38 P

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CAMPFIREFLY:
All this talk of gear ratios etc is fine and dandy but thanks for getting to the heart of buying a roadbike. Fit. And this LBS sounds like they know what they're talking about with respect to that (and gearing too, heh heh...)

Whatever you decide, don't be the fool on a 2000 dollar bike with a 2 cent fit.

In God we trust, all others bring data.
- W. Edwards Demings

If God invented marathons to keep people from doing anything more stupid, the triathlon must have taken Him completely by surprise.
-P.Z. Pearce

Specificity, specificity, specificity.
-Andy Coggan

The plural of "anecdote" is not "data".
- Frank Kotsonis


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CAMPFIREFLY's Photo CAMPFIREFLY Posts: 24
7/24/08 4:36 P

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Wonderchi,

You beat me to the "post message" button. Thank you for the GREAT info!

Anything can be accomplished in baby-steps!


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CAMPFIREFLY's Photo CAMPFIREFLY Posts: 24
7/24/08 4:30 P

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Yes, laser measured! Talk about a great fit! Here in Rhode Island it has been very stormy for the last few days. Yesterday, I happen to catch a few minutes of clear weather to try the Specialized Dolce Elite. Oh, my gosh...the fit was AMAZING. The LBS set the bike to the specifications produced by the software in which he fed my measurements.

When I asked this bike store owner about the difference in the double and triple cranks, he offered to switch out the triple for a compact double...no charge. I'm still debating...Rhode Island is FLAT, but I bike a lot in the hills of Massachusetts. I've been told the double will be a bit lighter (I'm not planning on racing, so I'm not so concerned about the weight of the bike), and there is less duplication, I was also told that the difference in individual gears will be greater. Decisions, decisions...

Thank you to all who have written... suggestions/discussions continue to be welcome :-)

Edited by: CAMPFIREFLY at: 7/24/2008 (16:59)
Anything can be accomplished in baby-steps!


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WONGERCHI's Photo WONGERCHI Posts: 3,889
7/24/08 4:10 P

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LDJONE2:
That's an interesting point and I agree with you to some extent. In fact, I considered getting a triple for my bike for some of the hills out here for the simple reason of bail-out gears. The LBS convinced me to change to a 12-27 in the back and that was the best advice.

Actually, I should confess that my cross bike has the 12-27 on it - the dirt trails are steep around here! My roadbike is a standard double (53/39) with a 12-25...

I was bored and went to have a play with the late, great Sheldon Brown's gear chart ( sheldonbrown.com/gears/ ) as well as the Fuji bikes website (I own a couple of Fujis and it was the only one to hand) and came up with something rather interesting...

According to the Fuji website, their top-of-the-line triple crankset bikes (50/39/30) come with a 12-25 cogset as stock. Plugging in the numbers (700x23C wheelsize, 172.5 mm crank) the lowest gear (30x25) gives you 31.5 gear inches. If you switch from a triple to a compact double (50/34) with the 12-25, you get 35.7 gear inches. Obviously in this case the triple is the best bet - you gain an extra gear, very nice.

However, as CAMPFIREFLY's LBS is going to swap the triple for the double, getting a cogset swap would also be easy. After you switch from a 12-25 to a 12-27, the lowest gear with a compact double is now 33.1 gear inches. That's only half a gear difference now, not really all that much.

Looking at the chart that the gear convertor spits out it's actually quite amazing how many duplicate gears you have with the triple. A compact double cuts out most of these duplicate gears - great news for me who is somewhat gear-challenged sometimes...

In addition, the big gears are the same (50x12 - 109.5 gear inches). Add that to the easier shifting, lack of overlapping gears and overall easier maintenance and it's a compelling argument for a compact double.

Jim:
Getting a triple installed is more of a pain that you'd think - or I thought! Here's a good link on gearing:

www.roadcycling.com/cgi-bin/artman/e
xe
c/view.cgi/8/1362



Edited by: WONGERCHI at: 7/24/2008 (16:36)
In God we trust, all others bring data.
- W. Edwards Demings

If God invented marathons to keep people from doing anything more stupid, the triathlon must have taken Him completely by surprise.
-P.Z. Pearce

Specificity, specificity, specificity.
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The plural of "anecdote" is not "data".
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JHOLLNAGEL Posts: 1,768
7/24/08 2:06 P

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Now I'm really baffled as to what to do when I buy a new bike. I do not have hills like you do in CO So I'm thinking I should stay with 2 but if I ever want to take a cycling trip to CO should I see if the LBS will loan and change out to a 3 Sprocket????

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LDJONE2 Posts: 71
7/23/08 9:04 P

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Like you, I live in CO. (Littleton area...) I've been recovering from knee surgery in June and haven't done a lot of riding this summer, but as the recovery goes along I plan to start doing some the the "up the canyon" rides that I usually do. Here's what I'd say about double vs. triple. If you are going to ride the hills and canyons around here, I'd stick with the triple unless you are an experienced and very fit rider. The combination of long steep slopes and high altitude (most of my riding is between 6000 and 9000 ft) is a real challenge and you probably won't be sorry if you have the extra set of "bail-out" gears that go with the triple. If you plan on staying down on the flats, the double would be OK, but go with the compact chainring combination as it will give you more versatility.

 
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JHOLLNAGEL Posts: 1,768
7/23/08 10:35 A

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W

Thanks for the tid bit. I currently have a triple but when I decide to go on the dark side and buy carbon fiber I'll stick with your suggestions

Jim

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WONGERCHI's Photo WONGERCHI Posts: 3,889
7/23/08 9:12 A

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CAMPFIREFLY:
The only reason why you'd want a triple is for the really low gears for hills. In my opinion the triple is just deadweight and unnecessarily complicates shifting.

What I'd do is swap out the triple for a double compact crank (50T big ring, 34T small ring). Couple that with say a 12-27 rear cogset and you'll be able to climb anything. Even Alpe d'Huez.



In God we trust, all others bring data.
- W. Edwards Demings

If God invented marathons to keep people from doing anything more stupid, the triathlon must have taken Him completely by surprise.
-P.Z. Pearce

Specificity, specificity, specificity.
-Andy Coggan

The plural of "anecdote" is not "data".
- Frank Kotsonis


 current weight: 190.0 
 
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REBCCA's Photo REBCCA SparkPoints: (270,082)
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7/22/08 4:20 P

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Laser technology measuring is new to me. Sounds concise!!

On the triple vs. double crank, I don't know what the up side of having a double crank is. I definitely use that big (3rd) gear, and all the other gears on every ride I take...but then I always have hills and steep climbs.

Hope some of the more expert riders answer this for you.

"Learn from nature: See how everything gets accomplished and how the miracle of life unfolds without dissatisfaction or unhappiness."
Eckhart Tolle



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CAMPFIREFLY's Photo CAMPFIREFLY Posts: 24
7/22/08 2:04 P

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UPDATE...

Just got back from bike shop #2 where they measured me with laser technology...very cool!

Still looking for double vs. triple crank input...this shop is willing to switch out a triple for a double at no charge. Thoughts??

Anything can be accomplished in baby-steps!


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REBCCA's Photo REBCCA SparkPoints: (270,082)
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7/22/08 1:05 P

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You are so welcome. Hope you find the right bike for you and wishes of wellness to you too!

"Learn from nature: See how everything gets accomplished and how the miracle of life unfolds without dissatisfaction or unhappiness."
Eckhart Tolle



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CAMPFIREFLY's Photo CAMPFIREFLY Posts: 24
7/21/08 5:05 P

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Rebcca,

Many thanks for your suggestion! My back has finally healed (start physical therapy on Wed. to learn how to strengthen my back and core so to prevent the injury from happening again), so now I can start test driving bikes! I have a Cannondale dealer nearby...I'll try your model first. I have a triple now, but it seems there is a push for the double crank...hmmm.
Again, thanks!

Anything can be accomplished in baby-steps!


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JHOLLNAGEL Posts: 1,768
7/21/08 5:04 P

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Also, your LBS should have a mock frame bike set up to measure what size frame you need, seat post, handle bar stem, etc etc .... then from there they should be able to recommend what manufacturers fit your measurements and go from there.

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7/21/08 3:58 P

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Hello CampFireFly,

Well I did test rides and lots of reading of reviews when I started shopping. I was looking at the Specialized Dolce, when a knowledgeable cyclist showed the details and engineer/design features on the Cannondale Synapse Feminine Carbon 5 (triple) www.cannondale.com/bikes/08/cusa/mod
el
-8RWC5T.html

The reviews I read all gave 5 out of 5 top ratings and I emoticon love, love this bike. I have had it 7 weeks and have ridden it 650+ miles of easy and comfortable climbing and cruising. I live in hilly Colorado and am 5'3" and highly recommend this bicycle.

My Synapse weighs 18 pounds 'cause I added tube protectors and so far no flats. I do inflate my tires to proper pressure before each ride.

Edited by: REBCCA at: 7/21/2008 (16:12)
"Learn from nature: See how everything gets accomplished and how the miracle of life unfolds without dissatisfaction or unhappiness."
Eckhart Tolle



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WMARKS's Photo WMARKS Posts: 77
7/21/08 11:19 A

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I'm also in the market for a new road bike in the next couple of months and have been trying to figure out what to get. I have talked to some people on the cycling team at my school, and they recommended picking a price point and going into all the different LBS's and riding different brands around the price point and comparing components.

I'm looking around $1500, trying to get at a minimum all 105 but preferably some ultegra, carbon seat stays and fork, and whatever fits me well.

Hoya Saxa.


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CAMPFIREFLY's Photo CAMPFIREFLY Posts: 24
7/21/08 9:44 A

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Rebcca,

Thank you so much for the link. The discussions were somewhat helpful, but offered suggestions on a variety of bike types. Specifically, I'm looking for suggestions on an entry level ROAD bike (not a hybrid or a cross-trainer).

Since posting last, I have read a number of articles. Most suggest I should look for an aluminum frame with a carbon fork, a double crank over a triple crank and I should go for Shamano breaks.

Also, I read a number of reviews that suggest the Specialized Dolce and Dolce Elites are well built and deliver a smooth ride (some even use them for racing), but they best for longer legs and shorter torso women. I am 5'1" and have short legs and a long torso. Also, I have broad shoulders. How can one tell if a frame is going to work for the long haul during a five minute test drive??

Any suggestions are welcome!

Anything can be accomplished in baby-steps!


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REBCCA's Photo REBCCA SparkPoints: (270,082)
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7/15/08 7:43 P

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www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/team_mes
sa
geboard_thread.asp?board=0x1670x1488R>5597


above is link to that other buying tips thread
Happy trails emoticon

Edited by: REBCCA at: 7/15/2008 (20:12)
"Learn from nature: See how everything gets accomplished and how the miracle of life unfolds without dissatisfaction or unhappiness."
Eckhart Tolle



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7/15/08 7:34 P

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There is a thread with suggestions from more experienced riders on how to shop for road bike. One of the multi-stated tips was to go to LBS and take different bikes on test rides. Last year I bought a Raleigh comfort bike (heavy) and decided to try riding again for the first time in decades.
7 weeks ago I bought a road bike (Ultra light) www.cannondale.com/bikes/08/cusa/mod
el
-8RWC5T.html

I LOVE emoticon my Synapse and did do a number of test rides. I live in hilly area (Colorado) and find this new road bike to be a whole new freedom. The design does all the wonderful things it claims and is well worth the upgrade.
If I find the link to the other advise thread I will post it.

Edited by: REBCCA at: 7/15/2008 (19:33)
"Learn from nature: See how everything gets accomplished and how the miracle of life unfolds without dissatisfaction or unhappiness."
Eckhart Tolle



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CAMPFIREFLY's Photo CAMPFIREFLY Posts: 24
7/15/08 5:54 P

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I'm in the market for a new road bike...

Last year I purchased a Fuji Absolute DX (hybrid) because I (a strong spinner) wanted to stay in pace with my 12 year old son (heavy mountain bike) on the local flat bike path. And, I wanted to be able to go on the local fire roads.

This summer I moved to a very hilly area. After a few rides (25 to 30 miles) I ended up pulling my trapezius muscle (OUCH!). My riding partner and doctor believe the injury was caused because I'm hovering on a bike that is designed to keep me upright.

I love road riding! And, no longer do I need to keep pace with my son, as he has become a strong rider. Any suggestions you might have on what road bikes to consider would be very helpful.

Anything can be accomplished in baby-steps!


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