Author: Sorting Last Post on Top ↓ Message:
CYCLERJENN's Photo CYCLERJENN Posts: 29
7/3/08 12:45 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
The information that PLAYINGOUTDOORS gave is great. Thank you.

Here are a few other items that I would add to the list.

1. Keep your upper body still. Don't rock with our stroke. THis uses energy and does not help you with your ride.

2. Sit back in the saddle just a little. This will engage the Gluts and the Hamstrings.

3. Concentrate on your breathing and your stroke. Use more of a pull then and push in your stroke and breath deep. This will help keep you relaxed which will lower your heart rate.

Good luck with your climbs

 Pounds lost: 12.8 
 
0
10.5
21
31.5
42
REBCCA's Photo REBCCA SparkPoints: (255,629)
Fitness Minutes: (148,859)
Posts: 20,150
7/3/08 9:55 A

Community Team Member

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
you can also click on the button at the bottom to save the thread to 'Spark Favorites'

...where attention goes, energy flows...


550 Maintenance Weeks
 
0
140
280
420
560
WYLDMOONWOMAN's Photo WYLDMOONWOMAN Posts: 489
7/2/08 10:21 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
cut and paste the posts to a word document

~Lisa~

I am bringing sexy back!

"Never had such a good time in my life before, I'd like to have it one time more...One good ride from start to end"
Grateful Dead



 Pounds lost: 23.0 
 
0
21.25
42.5
63.75
85
MACPHOBIC's Photo MACPHOBIC Posts: 136
7/2/08 9:21 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Awesome advise. Is there a way to print individual posts? I sure would like to have it for the future, without actually writing it down?

 current weight: 130.0 
 
137
134
131
128
125
PLAYINGOUTDOORS's Photo PLAYINGOUTDOORS SparkPoints: (12,881)
Fitness Minutes: (12,349)
Posts: 518
7/2/08 2:05 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
GTOWNHOYAS09 - The info was from a book that I borrowed from the library. It was published by Bicycling Magazine. It was a really informative book..I think I'm going to try to find it on www.half.com so I have it for future reference.

emoticon

-------- __~@
----- _ `\/, _
---- (*) / (*)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

(`v)
..`*.*..
Playing Outdoors
WONGERCHI's Photo WONGERCHI Posts: 3,889
7/2/08 10:42 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
PLAYINGOUTDOORS:
Great tips - I've seen those before but it's always good to have a refresher.

General rule for a long, steep hill - sit and spin. Actually, I alternate sitting and standing but I'm in my lowest gears (small ring in front, large in back) for most of the time with a cadence around 70.

I'm not a big fan of hills but they do make you stronger...

In God we trust, all others bring data.
- W. Edwards Demings

If God invented marathons to keep people from doing anything more stupid, the triathlon must have taken Him completely by surprise.
-P.Z. Pearce

Specificity, specificity, specificity.
-Andy Coggan

The plural of "anecdote" is not "data".
- Frank Kotsonis


 current weight: 190.0 
 
210
202.5
195
187.5
180
PATTYANN23's Photo PATTYANN23 Posts: 387
7/2/08 10:38 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
PLAYINGOUTDOORS- thank you for sharing! These tips are incredibly helpful!

 Pounds lost: 10.0 
 
0
18.75
37.5
56.25
75
WMARKS's Photo WMARKS Posts: 77
7/2/08 10:10 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Awesome post. Thanks! Is that article on bicycling.com?

Hoya Saxa.


 current weight: 178.0 
 
270
241.25
212.5
183.75
155
REBCCA's Photo REBCCA SparkPoints: (255,629)
Fitness Minutes: (148,859)
Posts: 20,150
7/2/08 8:55 A

Community Team Member

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
PLAYINGOUTDOORS-Thank you for the concise post...wonderful!! emoticon

...where attention goes, energy flows...


550 Maintenance Weeks
 
0
140
280
420
560
WYLDMOONWOMAN's Photo WYLDMOONWOMAN Posts: 489
7/2/08 7:03 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Thank you for posting that...I start the hills much harder than I should because I try to get maximum momentum at the bottom thinking that it will be easier to get up to the top...then I want to die...I am going to take an easier approach at the start today...

~Lisa~

I am bringing sexy back!

"Never had such a good time in my life before, I'd like to have it one time more...One good ride from start to end"
Grateful Dead



 Pounds lost: 23.0 
 
0
21.25
42.5
63.75
85
PLAYINGOUTDOORS's Photo PLAYINGOUTDOORS SparkPoints: (12,881)
Fitness Minutes: (12,349)
Posts: 518
7/2/08 2:43 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I was just reading on this very topic today - a book called "Long Distance Cycling" by Edmund R. Burke and Ed Pavelka (sponsored by Bicycle Magazine). I know there are many different recommendations out there but I have listed some of the suggestions from the book on hill climbing. Hopefully it will help you.

1. Don't go anaerobic. Your best overall performance will come if you climb strongly but avoid the glycogen-gobbling consequences of switching to anaerobic metabolism. Is it better to stand or sit? It depends on the terrain and personal preference -what feels better to you. Most riders will find that sitting uses less energy because body weight is supported by the bike. For the majority of cyclists, going from saddle to standing causes an increase in heart rate in the range of three to five beats per minute.

2. The rule of thumb is to climb long, steady hills in the saddle to conserve energy. Even so, it's good to stand occasionally for a couple dozen pedal strokes. This increases comfort by changing by position and altering the muscles that are bearing the strain. Before rising, shift to the next higher gear (smaller cog) so you won't lose speed. Cadence tends to drop when you stand.

3. Don't lean too far forward when standing - this slows you by grinding the front tire into the pavement or causing the rear wheel to lose traction on a trail.

4. Use the right gear - the correct ratio when you're standing will make it feel like you're walking upstairs. The gear is too low if you're bouncing and feeling little pedal pressure causing you to power stroke too quickly. If you must work the bike from side to side with a grinding cadence, the gear is too high.

5. Go low - bail out gears can save the day on hilly rides

6. Keep your cadence up - on extended climbs, use a gear that you can pedal at about 70-80 rpm. This will be a relatively low gear helps control your heart rate for the entire hill.

7. Pedal in circles - Concentrate on pedaling across the stroke rather than simply up and down. The idea is to apply some power horizontally, especially through the bottom. This recruits more leg muscles and enhances momentum.

8. Shift just before you need to - anticipate shifts to lower gears such as when starting a climb. Don't shift too soon and waste precious momentum, but do shift before you're forced to apply heavy pressure to keep the crankset turning.

9. Start easy - to climb faster, begin in a lower gear than you need and shift up as you ascend. Coach Chris Carmichael says to imagine yourself as a carpet unrolling. It's the way pro road racers do it. The alternative - starting a long climb in the biggest gear you can handle - is likely to have you slogging away searching for a lower (and slower) gears well before the top. Be conservative early, and then you'll have the option of stepping up your pace.

10. Sit up - most roadies find they can't breathe as well if they grip the drops when climbing - the aerodynamic advantage of a low position isn't important at climbing speeds. Instead, grip the bar top or brake lever hoods to sit up and help your diaphragm expand.

11. Breathe deeply and rhythmically - to prevent shallow breathing concentrate on expelling air forcefully and completely, letting your lungs refill passively. Do this in sync with pedal strokes.

12. Slide on the saddle - on long, gradual climbs, move forward on the seat to emphasize the quads. After pedaling in that position for a while, slide back to relieve the quads and accentuate the glutes. These shifts help fend off muscle fatigue and extend your energy.

13. Relax your upper body - grip the bar lightly, bend elbows slightly, keep back flat and shoulders back so the chest is open for full, deep breathing.

14. Bob a bit - rocking your upper body helps establish a rhythm that aids climbing. Don't intentionally exaggerate this, but also don't try to prevent it - do what feels natural.

15. Train with weights - gain climbing power with squats or leg presses. For upper body - rowing exercises develop the strength to pull on the handlebars and balance the force exerted by the legs.

16. Finish every hill - it's natural to let up near the top of a climb when the crest comes into view. You ease pedal pressure to reduce the strain causing the pace to slow to a crawl. Instead, make time on every hill by not reducing your effort until gravity is pulling you the other way. You might even shift up and stand across the crest to stretch your legs and build extra momentum for the descent.

Sorry if it seems like a long post but I applied some of these techniques on my ride tonite and it really helped me tackly the hills.

emoticon

-------- __~@
----- _ `\/, _
---- (*) / (*)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

(`v)
..`*.*..
Playing Outdoors
REBCCA's Photo REBCCA SparkPoints: (255,629)
Fitness Minutes: (148,859)
Posts: 20,150
7/1/08 10:25 A

Community Team Member

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Wow, I have never used the biggest sprocket in the front to make it up the steep hills. The hill I climb is 2 miles of noticeable upgrade with .75 miles of it being really steep. I feel triumphant every time I do that climb. I agree with the relaxing of the upper body and it has helped me to conciously breath to the silently spoken french words of "Oui, Oui, Oui" on the inhale and "Merci, Merci, Merci" on the exhale. Mostly I start in the middle sprocket in front and middle in the back by find I need to eventually shift to the smallest sprocket in front and biggest in the back. I got my first comfort bike last June, rode lots until Winter came and then got my first road bike at the beginning of June, so my experience is 'beginner' range.

Edited by: REBCCA at: 7/1/2008 (14:34)
...where attention goes, energy flows...


550 Maintenance Weeks
 
0
140
280
420
560
JHOLLNAGEL Posts: 1,768
7/1/08 10:06 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Here is what Kjeanne suggested to me on this same question, I hope I can explain it correctly,:

Shift to your biggest sprocket up front and also in back before the start of the hill and get some speed going. Shift to lower gears in back as you climb the hill and stay in lower gear until you are up and over the hill. Then start recovering.

Now my hills are not long and steep enough for me to run out of this gear set up.

I do not know if you run out of low gears in back if you should than shift to a lower sprocket up front and start the process all over again. I have never had to question this yet but would be interested in knowing if this technique is correct?

Jim

 current weight: 229.0 
 
238
226
214
202
190
WMARKS's Photo WMARKS Posts: 77
7/1/08 8:54 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Just so I know how to understand all the tips that are put out there...how long is long? Do you mean like a half a mile?

Hoya Saxa.


 current weight: 178.0 
 
270
241.25
212.5
183.75
155
NJOYNOW's Photo NJOYNOW Posts: 1,279
7/1/08 7:49 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Hill climbing continues to be a challenge for me, too. So I'm interested to learn from others, as well.

I have been working to anticipate the terrain, and on keeping my cadence up, which requires me to gear down. But I try not to gear down too far or too quickly. And, keeping my upper body as relaxed as possible so I'm not wasting energy being tensed up.

 Pounds lost: 0.0 
 
0
4
8
12
16
WYLDMOONWOMAN's Photo WYLDMOONWOMAN Posts: 489
6/30/08 11:01 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Is there a technique that I should be aware of for the really long steep hills? I couldn't seem to keep my heart from beating out of control on this long steep hill today, and it seems like I am working way too hard to make it up a few hills. I backed off on my effort halfway up and almost tipped over...it was probably just the hill itself, but I can't help but think that there is a technique to tackling the hardest of hills.

Someone please enlighten me

~Lisa~

I am bringing sexy back!

"Never had such a good time in my life before, I'd like to have it one time more...One good ride from start to end"
Grateful Dead



 Pounds lost: 23.0 
 
0
21.25
42.5
63.75
85
Page: 1 of (1)  

Report Innappropriate Post

Other Cycling - Road, Mountain, Fun, Racing General Team Discussion Forum Posts

Topics: Last Post:
July Percentage Challenge 8/1/2013 7:35:44 PM
Rising From Ashes: Cycling Documentary 8/2/2013 12:54:14 PM
1st Half Century 9/27/2013 8:37:29 AM
Whelp! 6/12/2014 2:54:36 PM
Bicycle Camp at Colgate Univers (Central NY State) 5/2/2013 10:12:18 AM

Thread URL: http://www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/team_messageboard_thread.asp?board=0x1670x16300348

Review our Community Guidelines