Author: Sorting Last Post on Top ↓ Message:
RIPPEDPAUL1's Photo RIPPEDPAUL1 SparkPoints: (120,513)
Fitness Minutes: (110,768)
Posts: 4,634
2/14/10 7:26 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
emoticon

4 Noble Truths

1. Suffering is a part of life
2. Suffering is caused by our attachments and avoidances.
3. Suffering can be ended.
4. Freedom from suffering is possible by following the Eightfold path.

Bigotry disguised as morality is still bigotry just as an outhouse with
marble columns is still an outhouse.
--D. A. Ridgely

co-leader of the following teams:
Bears, growling the pounds away, PHILADELPHIA IS ON THE MOVE,
Living Life on a Shoes


 Pounds lost: 16.0 
 
0
19.25
38.5
57.75
77
JANETSJAMMING's Photo JANETSJAMMING SparkPoints: (15,459)
Fitness Minutes: (8,637)
Posts: 698
2/2/10 1:18 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
store brands, make a shopping list, never go to the store hungry,look at the bargain /day old bins and stores, and plan meals around what is on the shelves of freezer at least one day a week, one meatless meal a week and one breakfast for dinner a week

At times our own light goes out and is rekindled by a spark from another person. Each of us has cause to think with deep grartitude of those who have lighted the flame within us
Albert Schweitzer


 Pounds lost: 0.0 
 
0
15.75
31.5
47.25
63
DELLAD2's Photo DELLAD2 Posts: 444
2/1/10 9:09 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I have switch to paying in cash it sure helps so far. My impulse spending has decreased. D Going to try to live out of the freezer for a couple months next goal. Wish me luck. D

“Consult not your fears, but your hopes and dreams. Think not about your frustrations, but about your unfulfilled potential. Concern yourself not with what you have tried and failed in, but with what it is still possible for you to do.”
60SIXTY's Photo 60SIXTY Posts: 24,910
2/1/10 8:15 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
There is a thrifty popcorn recipe on the thread:
Today's GOAL for making life FRUGAL & SIMPLE!
www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/team_mes
sa
geboard_thread.asp?board=0x16395x294R>34183

I haven't tried this yet. But I am going to.

Linda - North East Indiana, USA `Goal to build myself up to reach 1,000 fitness minutes per month.

Frugalists and Simple Living [co-leader]
www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_individual.asp?gid=16395

Team Co-Leader for OSTEOARTHRITIS OF THE LOWER BACK
www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_i
ndividual.asp?gid=21800


"To lose a healthy one pound of fat per week, all it takes is a 500-calorie deficit per day."
BETRME100's Photo BETRME100 SparkPoints: (86,423)
Fitness Minutes: (108,027)
Posts: 17,654
1/30/10 7:08 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I made vegetable beef soup in the crock pot today...bought stew meat on sale last night and used half for the soup, put the other half in the freezer for the next batch (I'm not a big meat eater, so it's just enough to give the soup a great flavor)...this will be a quick dinner for the next few nights and the rest I'll put in the freezer...my house smells fantastic!!

Kit

Kit

Opportunity dances with those who are already on the dance floor.
Jackson Brown

Co-leader Bloomington,IN Spark team



 current weight: 266.0 
 
287
252.75
218.5
184.25
150
SHYFEMMEKAT's Photo SHYFEMMEKAT Posts: 1,771
1/22/10 12:28 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
We used to eat out a good bit but since we got back on Spark we eat out once a moth, on cheat day, when they have a special. The rest of the time we cook at home. It has saved a bunch of money. Something else is that now I measure most things and that bag of chips or box of cereal lasts a long time now. emoticon

Edited by: SHYFEMMEKAT at: 1/22/2010 (12:29)





 Pounds lost: 18.8 
 
0
53.5
107
160.5
214
60SIXTY's Photo 60SIXTY Posts: 24,910
1/22/10 7:22 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Good tips.
1. Ordinarily we eat at home. We eat out once a week.
This week, we have been out of town almost every day.
Wednesday, we ate in a nearby college town at Subway. We bought a foot-long and split it. Three days out of the past 8, we ate in the hometown of a former Vice President. We went to Burger King. We got "senior" drinks, $1 burgers [we both removed half of the bun.] and a $1 Salad. We fed two people for $4 plus tax, each time. Yesterday, I bought a beef roast that was marked down $3. I put it in the crock pot and we took it to our daughter's home. Half of it was still left. We gave it to them for another meal.

2. I know what meals I am buying for. But, many times, I pick out the meat after I check for discounts [as I did yesterday with the roast.] Then, I head back to produce to buy what I need to go with the meal. I also had a list.

3-6 I definitely do.
7. The kids are all past 30.
8. I don't buy in bulk. I just shop local. Besides, there are only two of us.
9. I use the store rewards cards in two stores. Otherwise the prices would be way higher than the Mom & Pop grocery here in town. The later is often cheaper than the chain stores.
10. I have trouble finding coupons for things I need. but occasionally I find coupons for cereal or bread.

BETRME100 Has listed a lot of other tips.

Linda - North East Indiana, USA `Goal to build myself up to reach 1,000 fitness minutes per month.

Frugalists and Simple Living [co-leader]
www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_individual.asp?gid=16395

Team Co-Leader for OSTEOARTHRITIS OF THE LOWER BACK
www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_i
ndividual.asp?gid=21800


"To lose a healthy one pound of fat per week, all it takes is a 500-calorie deficit per day."
GRANDMAAMIE's Photo GRANDMAAMIE Posts: 44,049
1/20/10 3:11 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
emoticon

.•*´¨ ) ¸.•*¨) -:¦:-
(¸.•´(•*¨. ♥.•*¨)
{¸.•´+*+AMIE+*+*+{¸ ;.• .•*¨}.•* .**+* SORRY ABOUT CAPS NOT YELLING VERY POOR EYE SIGHT DIABETIC +++++ HUGGS

Stop living life for what's around the corner and start enjoying the walk down the street.
***************************

NEVER LOOK DOWN AT ANYONE UNLESS YOUR HELPING THEM UP!
****************************

This life is yours. Take the power
to choose what you want to do .


 Pounds lost: 18.0 
 
0
34.5
69
103.5
138
MONGO2TEN's Photo MONGO2TEN Posts: 10,883
1/19/10 3:32 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
We have been paying in cash for awhile now. It's made a huge difference in our bill. We used the debit card in December and the grocery bill for that month was way up!

I also use my CVS extra care card and get Target gift cards throughout the year that I use on Black Friday.

~Nancy



 current weight: 126.2 
 
180
162.25
144.5
126.75
109
SUSHAH Posts: 763
1/19/10 7:37 A

Reply
When I do my weekly grocery shopping, I have made it a habit to check the "reduced produce" and "clearance items" racks. I will purchase produce (or any clearance item) offered at a reduced price only if it is still of good quality, and is a product I can use. (Ripe bananas-often offered at a reduced price-are perfect for making loaves of banana bread.)

DELLAD2's Photo DELLAD2 Posts: 444
1/17/10 8:28 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I have decide to pay more attention to my spending also. These are some great tips thanks for posting them. D

“Consult not your fears, but your hopes and dreams. Think not about your frustrations, but about your unfulfilled potential. Concern yourself not with what you have tried and failed in, but with what it is still possible for you to do.”
CHEFBLUEROSE's Photo CHEFBLUEROSE Posts: 4,054
1/17/10 12:25 A

Send Private Message
Reply
emoticon

One step at a time!

Kimberly


 Pounds lost: 0.0 
 
0
6.425
12.85
19.275
25.7
DEBBIEK60's Photo DEBBIEK60 SparkPoints: (48,469)
Fitness Minutes: (33,649)
Posts: 1,000
1/16/10 5:04 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Excellent tips. Thanks. I also pay close attemtion to the cost per oz/gram etc. so I am in control, rather than at the mercy of the packaging which is sometimesmisleading as to how much it contains.

DebbieK


 current weight: 157.4 
 
185
172
159
146
133
HOPE208's Photo HOPE208 Posts: 93
1/16/10 4:51 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
These are great tips. I have learned that if I make it myself then the cost is much lower. I don't buy the "convenience" foods such as the On-cor dinners and any other frozen entree. We are a family of 5 and our weekly grocery bill is pretty high. I have been tracking it. It comes close to $400. I would like to get it down to $75 a week. I think we can do it. I'll keep everyone posted when I am finally able to do so.

 current weight: 205.0 
 
215
200.75
186.5
172.25
158
BETRME100's Photo BETRME100 SparkPoints: (86,423)
Fitness Minutes: (108,027)
Posts: 17,654
1/16/10 4:37 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I don't know about anyone else, but I decided this was going to be the year I paid closer attention to my spending habits and start saving more money...saw this article and found some useful ideas here...one thing they neglected was growing your own food...if you grow heirlooms, you can even save your own seeds from year to year...what a savings that can be!

22 Ways To Fight Rising Food Prices by Lisa Smith (Contact Author | Biography)Email Article Print FeedbackReprintsFiled Under: Budgeting, Credit Cards, Personal Finance
Food, clothing and shelter generally top the list of basic human needs. While shopping at a discount store instead of the mall generally takes care of the clothing issue, and living in a small apartment instead of a McMansion can address your housing situation, rising world food prices can lead to some significant challenges in the food department. Everything from rising transportation costs to the development of biofuels, such as biodiesel, push up the cost of food and put a pinch on consumers' wallets.

While the need to eat isn't something you can avoid, there are some steps you can take to keep the costs in check.

1. Eat at Home
Dining out is an expensive proposition. Just about any nutritious meal that you buy in a formal restaurant can be made at home for a fraction of the price. Even good coffee is cheaper to make if you do it yourself. Fast food is excluded from the category, as high-calorie, low-quality food can be had a bargain price, but the impact on your long-term health overrides the benefit of short-term savings. (If you love restaurants, try investing in them instead of eating at them. To learn more, see Sinking Your Teeth Into Restaurant Stocks.)

2. Shop With a Plan
If you stumble around the grocery store and fill your cart with everything that catches your eye, chances are you will spend a lot more money that you needed to spend. To minimize your cash outlay, prepare a shopping list before you leave home. Plan your meals for the week ahead, and make careful note of what you need to buy in order to prepare those meals. Once the list is made, purchase only the items on the list, and avoid impulse buys. (Learn how to create a budget. See The Beauty Of Budgeting and Get Your Budget In Fighting Shape.)

3. Put on Blinders
Grocery stores are designed to make you go through a maze to get to the most basic items you need in the hope that you will make a few impulse buys along the way. If you keep to your planned list of needed foods, you won't be tempted when you get forced down the junk food aisle to get at the milk. Because most necessities and basic cooking items are found along the outside perimeter of the store, start there and work your way around the edge of the store, only stepping into the maze to grab any leftover items on your list.

4. Eat Before You Shop
When you are hungry and you walk into a building full of food, there's a high likelihood that you are going to fill you cart with unnecessary and expensive purchases that appeal to your taste buds. To keep your costs down, eat first and shop on a full stomach.

5. Avoid Prepared Foods
Our fast-paced society encourages convenience, and the grocery store has capitalized on this trend. Ready-made meals are easy to buy, but come with a premium price tag. Instead of putting that rotisserie chicken and macaroni salad in you cart, buy the ingredients and prepare the meal yourself. The same concept applies to frozen entrées, baked goods and any other food that has been prepared in some way for added convenience.

6. Skip the Bottled Water
If you don't like the water that comes out of the tap, buy a water filter. The per-gallon cost is significantly less than the cost of bottled water - and without all the plastic bottles to discard, it's a lot easier on the environment. (To invest in water, read Water: The Ultimate Commodity.)

7. Shop Without the Kids
Hungry, tired, cranky kids increase the amount of time it takes to get your shopping done. Every extra minute that you spend in the grocery store increases the likelihood of extra items finding their way into your cart, including toys and snacks designed to keep the kids quiet while you try to focus on finding a few bargains.

8. Buy in Bulk
Bulk buying can save you a significant amount of money. Pay attention to the prices and pick up the family size package if the per-unit cost is lower and you have a place to store it. Shopping at big-box bulk retailers like Sam's Club and Costco can also save on your bill if you shop there frequently enough to cover the cost of membership, but pay careful attention to your spending habits. The big boxes are often no bargain at all when compared to sales prices and coupon savings at other stores. In addition, they may encourage you to buy more than you need, driving up your grocery bill.(Bulk purchases aren't for everyone. To learn more, check out The Dark Side Of Bulk Buying.)


9. Use Store Reward Cards
If the store that you visit most frequently has a reward card, be sure to sign up. In some cases, stores raise their prices when they offer reward cards, and without the card your bill will certainly be higher. If the reward card offers other benefits, such as a ham for the holidays or a discount on gasoline, be sure to maximize your benefits by paying attention to the cutoff dates and cashing in your points before they expire.

10. Use Coupons
Coupons provide an easy way to save money. Clip them and cash them in, paying particular attention to stores that double the value of manufacturers' coupons. A number of websites also offer coupons exclusively, and they are a great place to search for discounts on the items you have on your list. If you frequent a website of your favorite brands, they will often offer discounts to their faithful public. A few minutes of surfing online can make a difference at the till.

11. Buy Locally
Locally grown or produced food is often available at a cheaper price because you don't pay for long transportation costs. Farmer's markets, fairs, and the local aisle at your grocery store are all game for deals on tasty and fresh food.

12. Look Down
Stores often place the most expensive items at eye-level. To find less expensive items, look down. Also, looking around your brand-name food can find you a cheaper generic alternative. Generic label products are often nearly identical to name-brand goods (in fact, they're often produced in the same factory), so don't pay for packaging when what you really want is the food inside. (For more insight, see Sneaky Strategies That Fuel Overspending.)

13. Avoid the End Caps and Checkout Temptations
Those displays placed at the end of each aisle often feature premium brands. Rather than grabbing those high-priced batteries or that extra box of cereal, walk down the aisle. Chances are good that walking a few extra feet will reward you with a less expensive option.

Many grocery stores now offer checkout lines that don't feature candy. Using these lanes not only helps you avoid the temptation to spend your money on sweets, but it also encourages a healthier lifestyle.

14. Compare Prices and Stores
Some consumers have trouble calculating the cost per unit in their heads, but it's something that gets a lot easier with practice. You can even carry a calculator. Looking at the brands and comparing prices is an easy way to shave a few cents off most purchases.

The store that features the lowest average prices in your area is often the best place for routine shopping, but the higher-priced competitor may run sales on specific items that undercut the cost at your most frequented venue. Watch for these sales and take advantage of them when possible.

15. Shop for Sales
As mentioned above, sales can be a great incentive to switch stores – but only if you need the items on sale. Pay attention to sales on necessity items and stock up on non-perishables and freezer goods. Keep an eye on the prices so that you know when a sale price is merely a small savings or when it is a significant discount to the normal price.

16. Watch "Best Before" or "Sell By" Dates
As the "sell by" or "best before" date approaches, you are virtually guaranteed a discount. For example, grocery stores lower prices as meat ages. Ask the butcher when the meats get marked down. Most stores have a fairly regular schedule that you can learn and follow. When you get a good deal, stock your freezer so you can avoid buying when the price is high. And if you plan on freezing the food, "best before" dates shouldn't worry you; the product will stay fresh until you thaw and cook it.

17. Substitute Recipe Items
If you have a higher-priced item that reoccurs in your favorite recipes, it may be time to shake up your taste buds. Often a lower-priced alternative can be found. For instance, if you consistently bake with olive oil and you see that the price has skyrocketed, a simple switch to applesauce (something that you might even be able to make if you have an apple tree) is a great cheap and low-fat substitution for many recipes. To help decide on a cheaper substitution, see The Cooking Thesaurus.
18. Keep Your Kitchen Stocked
A well-stocked kitchen means that you won't run out of staple items and need to buy them on the spur or the moment. Knowing what you have in the cabinet means that you can wait to make your purchases until items are on sale.

19. Shop Infrequently
Reducing the number of trips that you make to the store each week or month reduces the odds of unnecessary purchases, and minimizes the amount of gasoline spent getting there.

20. Pay Attention To Time
Weekly sales often run from mid-week to mid-week. Hold off on your shopping until after you've had a chance to clip coupons from the Sunday paper and you'll not only enjoy the sales prices but you might also get a coupon. Shopping during the evening or early morning also helps you avoid the crowds and spend less time in the store.

21. Pay In Cash
When you put groceries on your credit card and don't pay off the card in full each month, you pay interest on the purchase. To avoid this extra cost, pay in cash when you shop and keep necessities off your credit cards. (If you want to learn how to manage your credit card debt, read Take Control Of Your Credit Cards.)

22. Check Your Bill
Electronic scanners make the shopping experience faster and more convenient, but scanners aren't perfect. Be sure to take a look at the receipt to make sure your coupons and discounts were taken into account.

Shop Smart
Food is one of those purchases that you just can't avoid, but careful shoppers can minimize the amount spent on this necessary purchase. All it takes is a little time, patience and effort.

To learn more on saving money, see Squeeze A Greenback Out Of Your Latte.


by Lisa Smith, (Contact Author | Biography)

Kit

Kit

Opportunity dances with those who are already on the dance floor.
Jackson Brown

Co-leader Bloomington,IN Spark team



 current weight: 266.0 
 
287
252.75
218.5
184.25
150
Page: 1 of (1)  

Report Innappropriate Post

Other Frugalists and Simple Living General Team Discussion Forum Posts

Topics: Last Post:
JUNE 2013 CHAT - Welcome All 6/30/2013 12:11:02 PM
are you living frugal and why??? 6/21/2014 9:05:18 PM
'JANUARY 2014 CHAT - Welcome All' 1/31/2014 12:35:52 AM
'NOVENBER 2013 CHAT - Welcome All' 11/29/2013 11:43:54 PM
Budget and stocking up on sale items 1/8/2014 12:34:16 PM

Thread URL: http://www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/team_messageboard_thread.asp?board=0x16395x31144264

Review our Community Guidelines