Author: Sorting Last Post on Top ↓ Message:
CBRINKLEY401's Photo CBRINKLEY401 SparkPoints: (86,176)
Fitness Minutes: (19,961)
Posts: 2,670
6/7/14 12:58 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Depending on the bulb size, I usually divide them into small clumps of a few bulbs each, especially if there are immature bulbs connected to the larger ones. I often do that with daffodil or tulip bulbs, and just make sure that I don't plant each small clump too close to other ones. That way they don't look so sparse the first year they come up. And it should still be several years before they get to the size that they need to be divided again.



-Cathy
Central Standard Time Zone

If it's to be, it's up to ME.

Organic Gardeners team leader
www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_i
ndividual.asp?gid=12953


 Pounds lost: 13.0 
 
0
16.75
33.5
50.25
67
SHARJOPAUL's Photo SHARJOPAUL Posts: 31,374
6/5/14 7:27 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I would separate all the bulbs, leaving them in clumps will only make them over crowded again sooner. When planting them, I would dig a hole large enough to place several bulbs in it which should be separated by at least a couple of inches. This will give the bulbs room to multiply without having to be transplanted again as soon.


MICHTOTMAN's Photo MICHTOTMAN Posts: 815
6/4/14 8:52 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Oh yeah... since there in big clumps, how would you divide them? Single bulbs? Small clumps? They range in size from tee-tiny to the size of a marble - and larger...


The greatest glory in living lies not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.

NELSON MANDELA


 Pounds lost: 3.2 
 
0
10.5
21
31.5
42
MICHTOTMAN's Photo MICHTOTMAN Posts: 815
6/4/14 6:59 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Perfect. Thanks!

The greatest glory in living lies not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.

NELSON MANDELA


 Pounds lost: 3.2 
 
0
10.5
21
31.5
42
CBRINKLEY401's Photo CBRINKLEY401 SparkPoints: (86,176)
Fitness Minutes: (19,961)
Posts: 2,670
6/4/14 3:43 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
As long as the foliage is dead, you just store them in a cool, dry place, then plant them where you want in the fall. Actually, it probably doesn't matter where you store them, as long as you keep them dry and away from light. Just don't put them in the refrigerator, as that is what you do to force bulbs to grow and bloom early (usually you put them in a pot with dirt, water it, and then put in the refrigerator for a few weeks). You don't want to have them start to grow right after you plant them in the fall.

I'm in process of doing the same with the daffodil bulbs that I missed when I was digging them out of a bed last year. The ones I dug up last year did just fine stored in a cardboard box in my laundry room all summer long.

-Cathy
Central Standard Time Zone

If it's to be, it's up to ME.

Organic Gardeners team leader
www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_i
ndividual.asp?gid=12953


 Pounds lost: 13.0 
 
0
16.75
33.5
50.25
67
SHARJOPAUL's Photo SHARJOPAUL Posts: 31,374
6/4/14 2:02 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I would wrap them in paper and store them in a cool dark place, like the basement. Generally speaking it is best to transplant bulbs in the fall, but I usually forget to mark them and can't find them.

MICHTOTMAN's Photo MICHTOTMAN Posts: 815
6/4/14 1:02 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Also - I have a LOT of them... like 2 buckets full!

The greatest glory in living lies not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.

NELSON MANDELA


 Pounds lost: 3.2 
 
0
10.5
21
31.5
42
MICHTOTMAN's Photo MICHTOTMAN Posts: 815
6/4/14 1:01 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I love them! I planted a bag of them about 10 years ago and they've grown in really bad, rocky soil and every year do not fail to bring me the very first glimpse of spring. emoticon

I need to transplant them now and, after 10 years, they are very much in need of it. I had to dig them today, but all the foliage was either dead or almost, so I didn't feel like waiting would have benefited them anyway. Now what??? I don't really have anywhere else to put them right now - in the late summer/early fall I will. Should I store them in the fridge 'til then? Perhaps in the basement? I did that with glads once, and it worked out.

What would you do? Or, what have you done with these before?

The greatest glory in living lies not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.

NELSON MANDELA


 Pounds lost: 3.2 
 
0
10.5
21
31.5
42
Page: 1 of (1)  

Report Innappropriate Post

Other Organic Gardeners General Team Discussion Forum Posts

Topics: Last Post:
Cultivating Dead Land 5/6/2014 1:16:56 AM
Seed Catalog Time - which ones do you like? 3/10/2014 9:36:44 AM
Worm Castings - what to do "until then"... 1/6/2014 9:42:19 AM
Itty Bitty Seedlings 6/4/2014 2:01:30 AM
List 3 jobs you plan to accomplish in your garden 3/3/2014 12:21:13 PM

Thread URL: http://www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/team_messageboard_thread.asp?board=0x12953x58108308

Review our Community Guidelines




x Lose 10 Pounds by February 5! Get a FREE Personalized Plan