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MICHTOTMAN's Photo MICHTOTMAN Posts: 815
5/20/12 6:47 P

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In Colorado we have a quite short growing season, and the water walls speed things up to the point where I get lots of tomatoes, peppers and eggplants - and yes they are quite labor intensive. But, in the end, I believe they're worth it.

Yvonne - Water walls are not for watering the plants - they're plastic tubes that surround the plant (above ground) and keep the soil and air around the plants warm.

The greatest glory in living lies not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.

NELSON MANDELA


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GREBJACK's Photo GREBJACK Posts: 3,217
5/20/12 5:03 P

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I never do anything as labor intensive as maintaining water walls - I'm of the school that if it doesn't want to grow in my climate, I'll grow something else. (my poor plants!) But I've never lost a tomato or pepper to the cold, even when the temperatures are fluctuating 40 degrees from one day to the next. Dunno about eggplants.

I wish you luck with whatever you try.

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ROLANDD's Photo ROLANDD SparkPoints: (64,917)
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5/20/12 2:03 P

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I cut off the bottom of gal milk jugs, bury them neck down next to my plants and fill them with water. This gives the plants a slow soak without my having to water them often. Good for tomatoes, watermelon and a myriad of other plants that need plenty of water. As far as mulch around my plants, I use grass clippings.

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TRAVELNISTA's Photo TRAVELNISTA SparkPoints: (180,213)
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5/20/12 12:23 P

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what are water walls?



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MICHTOTMAN's Photo MICHTOTMAN Posts: 815
5/20/12 9:14 A

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I always put my tomato seedlings inside water walls, and they work wonders. My peppers and eggplants are a little more difficult, however. I space them by the square foot gardening method - 1 per square foot - and my water walls have a larger than 1 ft diameter, making it extremely difficult to do it well. I've tried every-other-plant, hoping that the heat from the surrounding walls will benefit the un-walled plants, but those guys on the edge get shafted.

So I"m wondering about an alternate method... Has anyone used red plastic mulch on peppers and eggplants? I've read a lot about how beneficial it can be for tomatoes, but what about other nightshades? Thoughts? (PS - I'm about ready to put in my seedlings and the temperatures are crazy... 92 one day 75 the next and 62 the following day. I never know how warm it will be or not be.)

The greatest glory in living lies not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.

NELSON MANDELA


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