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HOUNDLOVER1's Photo HOUNDLOVER1 Posts: 7,911
11/1/11 10:12 P

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All the roots need pretty loose soil. I had a terrible time with carrots last year because of our clay soil and this year added a ton of horse manure. That helped a lot.

Birgit

You can talk to God all you want and that's great, but the changes happen when you start listening to him.

BE THE CHANGE YOU WANT TO SEE IN OTHERS.




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GARDENGIRL54's Photo GARDENGIRL54 Posts: 801
11/1/11 5:13 P

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Interesting. I may try this with parsnips next year. I haven't had very good luck wtih them yet. Seem to have trouble getting them to germinate - then my soil is too dense I think.

Gardengirl54

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ROLANDD's Photo ROLANDD SparkPoints: (64,917)
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11/1/11 1:32 A

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My grandfather did much the same but he did green tomatoes that he pulled vines and all. He put down a layer of wet straw on the basement floor of the summer house that he used as a work shop, then he would spread the plants over it, then another layer of straw, he continued to layer the plants and straw until he had all the plants covered. He told me that they had tomatoes well into December or until they had all ripened. The place wasn't heated nor did the tomatoes freeze. Straw tends to hold air in as an insulator much like fiber glass insulation does and the damp straw let the roots draw in the water to keep them green and nourishing the tomatoes.

Edited by: ROLANDD at: 11/1/2011 (01:33)
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KOKOEK9's Photo KOKOEK9 Posts: 7,158
10/31/11 11:49 P

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could you get some cheap bucket and fill them with dirt and store them out side for the winter

Mike


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SHUTRBUG1's Photo SHUTRBUG1 Posts: 4,837
10/31/11 11:05 P

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I guess I should have mentioned that we grew our crop at our community garden plot, and we had to have everything out by Oct 31. I would have kept them in the ground if we grew them at our house, since we it usually doesn't get cold enough in the northwest to freeze the ground.

Things do not change; we change.

Henry David Thoreau

SHARJOPAUL's Photo SHARJOPAUL Posts: 30,975
10/31/11 8:49 P

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Many root vegetables do get sweeter/develop more sugar when left in the ground at least through the fiirst hard freeze and can be left on into the winter if mulched well so that the ground can still be worked enough to get them out.
My parents stored potatos in adark unheated part of the basement in shallow bins and they kept most of the winter.

KOKOEK9's Photo KOKOEK9 Posts: 7,158
10/31/11 5:36 P

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I live in zone 5 and this is where I got the information, that have to freeze other wize they don't taste good

Mike


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HOUNDLOVER1's Photo HOUNDLOVER1 Posts: 7,911
10/31/11 3:39 P

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I'm in a fairly cold zone, Eastern WA, and people frequently leave carrots in the ground until needed. You can just put some mulch on top to give a little insulation.
Birgit

You can talk to God all you want and that's great, but the changes happen when you start listening to him.

BE THE CHANGE YOU WANT TO SEE IN OTHERS.




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GARDENGIRL54's Photo GARDENGIRL54 Posts: 801
10/31/11 3:32 P

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I'm thinking that might only be for warmer climates Koko. In zone 5 the ground is hard as rock! and often covered in snow....

Gardengirl54

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KOKOEK9's Photo KOKOEK9 Posts: 7,158
10/31/11 1:42 P

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I was told it is best to leave parsnips in the ground for the winter, it activates the sugars and improves the taste

Mike


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HOUNDLOVER1's Photo HOUNDLOVER1 Posts: 7,911
10/31/11 11:00 A

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I still have all of my roots in the ground. I heard that carrots can stay there until you need them. Not sure what to do with the beets and the potatoes. I think temps for cold storage need to be under 50 degrees so a garage might not work if outside temps get higher than that.
Birgit

Edited by: HOUNDLOVER1 at: 10/31/2011 (11:01)
You can talk to God all you want and that's great, but the changes happen when you start listening to him.

BE THE CHANGE YOU WANT TO SEE IN OTHERS.




 Body Fat %: 18.1
 
23.6
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17.9
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SHUTRBUG1's Photo SHUTRBUG1 Posts: 4,837
10/31/11 10:35 A

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I canned and froze most of my carrots and parsnips, but I wanted to try cold storage. Following instructions I saw online, I layered them in damp sawdust about 2 weeks ago. Now I noticed that the parsnips are getting mushy spots. Is my sawdust too damp? We lined a cardboard box with a plastic bag, since they need low circulation - too little circulation? I'm going to put them into the fridge, but I'd like to try cold storage again next year so any suggestions would be great.

They are in the garage, and we have had temperatures outside from 70 to 30 over the last few weeks.

Things do not change; we change.

Henry David Thoreau

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