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SHER116's Photo SHER116 Posts: 494
11/11/11 12:25 P

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I put in coleus in the shade. One of my shade beds is completely over-run with periwinkle from previous owner and I would never plant it again.

Sheri


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SNUGGLEBUG2 Posts: 2,903
9/28/11 4:35 P

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Interesting information!

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JWOURMS's Photo JWOURMS Posts: 750
8/5/11 11:04 A

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Oh... I've got a book written by Lois Hole all about edible flowers. She's a Canadian author, and typically offers advice for some of the colder growing zones. I'm not sure how available here book is in the States, but you could always check out www.Amazon.ca.

From memory she recommends nasturtiums (peppery), marigolds (not the French - as they're too bitter) and oh geeze.... I think It's related to the carnation... Dianthus also peppery in flavour.

And of course roses, and poppies (for the seed).

I think most of these are SUN lovers though - but there are climbing nasturtiums so that might work - violets are also edible - I'm thinking old fashioned cupcakes with sugared violets.

Jo

Edited by: JWOURMS at: 8/5/2011 (11:07)
..you may not be able to really feel compassion toward others until you are able to feel compassionate toward yourself. Margaret Paul


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EEVEE1's Photo EEVEE1 Posts: 4,426
7/5/11 10:37 P

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there is always impateins

Success consists of a series of little daily victories.

Laddie Hutar



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AMP1940's Photo AMP1940 Posts: 192
7/5/11 5:46 P

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Hi
I love perennial shade gardens and find that heuchera does beautifully & provides great dark wine colored leaves that make a good contrast to usual greens. Lady's mantle does well and not too high. My all time favorites in the shade are maiden hair ferns.
I don't know why more people don't use ferns as a hosta alternative. Check your library or google for many low growing varieties...Since the advent of google, there isn't a subject I can't find something about... emoticon

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EVELYNF's Photo EVELYNF SparkPoints: (13,326)
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7/5/11 1:12 P

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I think it's a Japanese Maple, not sure if that makes a difference, it's a fairly small tree... thanks for the suggestion, we have hostas up the wazoo in the back yard, I was looking for something a little smaller.



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GARDENGIRL54's Photo GARDENGIRL54 Posts: 801
7/1/11 8:45 A

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Even though it looks like you have your answer, I would add that hosta do amazingly well under trees. There are lots of varieties and sizes, and are often planted in rings around trees.

Also, you mentioned your maple tree had branches close to the ground. It is generally recommended that the lowest branch on a maple be 5 feet off the ground. This will help create a gorgeous canopy as the tree grows larger. emoticon

Gardengirl54

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EEVEE1's Photo EEVEE1 Posts: 4,426
6/28/11 8:05 P

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the ones under our noses are often the best ones

emoticon

Success consists of a series of little daily victories.

Laddie Hutar



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EVELYNF's Photo EVELYNF SparkPoints: (13,326)
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6/28/11 1:02 P

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Great - that's what I've seen too - thanks for the suggestions, ha! they were sitting right under my nose!



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EEVEE1's Photo EEVEE1 Posts: 4,426
6/27/11 10:14 P

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violets around here tend to grow in clumps that are not usually deep rooted. If they happen to get a little overboard, they are usually easy enough to thin out, they have never been a major issue for me. For us, periwinkle is a borderline invasive, but I have seen it growing under many shady trees with no obvious signs of damage to the trees

Success consists of a series of little daily victories.

Laddie Hutar



co-leaderof spark bookworms bookclub
www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_i
ndividual.asp?gid=7956


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MICHTOTMAN's Photo MICHTOTMAN Posts: 815
6/27/11 10:08 P

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The periwinkle definately takes over, but I've had no problem keeping it where I want it by just pulling or digging it out. I don't know about violets, though.

The greatest glory in living lies not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.

NELSON MANDELA


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EVELYNF's Photo EVELYNF SparkPoints: (13,326)
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6/27/11 9:17 P

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So I checked online and your periwinkle is what we call creeping myrtle - I love it, and we happen to have a little pot of it. so maybe I can do a combo of the violets and myrtle. Do you think the tree would be OK - they both seem to take over, the tree is well established.



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6/27/11 9:09 P

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Evee I didn't even think of violets, they grow wild like weeds in my yard. I don't like them in my specific gardens but I don't mind them in the grass.

I'll also look into the periwinkle, I've heard of it but don't really know much about it.

Thanks!



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EEVEE1's Photo EEVEE1 Posts: 4,426
6/27/11 8:06 P

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the violets grow in my yard (zone 5) very well. They get most of their flowers in spring, the they just have nice green leaves. You can add the flowers to salads and the leave can be lightly cooked as a green, or just cut up and added to the salad as well
www.care2.com/greenliving/a-vision-o
f-
violets-with-brigitte-mars.html


Success consists of a series of little daily victories.

Laddie Hutar



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www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_i
ndividual.asp?gid=7956


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SHARJOPAUL's Photo SHARJOPAUL Posts: 31,014
6/27/11 6:00 P

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Here is a link with lots of suggestions for edible flowers and some you should definitly avoid eating.
www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/garden/07
23
7.html


MICHTOTMAN's Photo MICHTOTMAN Posts: 815
6/27/11 3:50 P

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What about periwinkle (vinca minor)? We have it in shady areas and it does well. It's low to the ground, has attractive greenery and purple (or pink - depending on variety) flowers in the early summer. I did a quick search and it looks like it does well in just about every zone as long as it's in the shade. Even does well with part sun in some. I love it because it is extremely low maintenance as well.

The greatest glory in living lies not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.

NELSON MANDELA


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6/27/11 3:23 P

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Hi all:

I know we talk a lot about veggies on this board but was hoping for some flower suggestions, if they're edible even better!

My dilemma - I have a small maple tree in my front yard with nothing under it. it's fairly shady so I need something that does well in the shade and the branches start pretty low so it can't be anything that grows over 12 - 18 inches. In the spring there are a couple of daffodils and tulips so I'm OK with that but right now it's just a weed pile. I was thinking of thyme but haven't researched to see how it does in the shade.

I'm in Central NJ, zone 6 or 7, depending on who you ask...

Any suggestions??



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