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TWILAQ1's Photo TWILAQ1 Posts: 497
5/25/11 5:19 P

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That's encouraging! Thanks!

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5/25/11 3:33 P

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The first few months are slow but when they are happy they really start to multiply and can eat more. Mine eat over 5 lbs a week.





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GARDENGIRL54's Photo GARDENGIRL54 Posts: 802
5/24/11 1:53 P

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This is the type of system I'm using and I got the directions from somewhere here at Spark. I'm a novice so I think I overfed my wormies at first. I backed off that until they have time to procreate. Then I'm sure things will speed up.

I thought having the tea would be nice too. So far things are going pretty slowly, but there are some castings in there - just don't have to feed them very often. emoticon

Gardengirl54

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5/24/11 1:21 P

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Sounds like a nice system but how does it work?

One I have seen stacks three together thus giving the worms in the middle time to gravitate to the top for food leaving the middle with just worm compost and the bottom one would contain any watery run-off (no holes in its bottom ). So I can see using any run-off as tea and just switching the top two bins with each other as the worms rise. In this case you shouldn't be sitting on that shower curtain picking out the worms.





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TWILAQ1's Photo TWILAQ1 Posts: 497
5/23/11 9:56 P

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I have stacking bins - 3 sets, so a total of 6 bins. I drilled holes in the the bottoms and upper sides. I laid garden mesh on the bottom to not lose worms to the next bin, also to inhibit the drain holes from clogging. I placed a layer of soaked peat, then soaked shredded black & white newsprint and cardboard, then compost. I started out feeding them every 3 days or so, but that was too much. Now I'm down to about once a week. Recently they started eating more, so I may increase the frequency again. The other day I added another layer of soaked cardboard and paper, with soil/oak leaves on top. They seem happy with that.

Every change seems to take them a few days to adjust to.

Stepping in a rhythm to a Kurtis Blow
Who needs to think when your feet just go

~Tom Tom Club (Genius of Love)


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5/23/11 8:45 A

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WOW that's a lovely picture you painted in my mind. Not something I'd relish doing.

My bin is a design I made from the internet. It is polyester felt that forms a funnel and hangs from a frame. My compost comes out the bottom. These worms like to work towards the top of the bin so the compost matter at the bottom does not have worms in it. The opening in the bottom allows me to access it. I just break up and scoop from under until I see the first worm or start seeing worm eggs. I do this about every three months. I liked the idea of not fishing through the compost to pick out worms.

The three stacked bins with holes in their bottoms allow the worms to rise to the next higher bin when all the food is eaten also, i.e. there would be no worm picking with this either.

The polyester funnel was the cheapest way to get into this to try it. If I'd known how easy worm composting is and that I stay with it this long I'd probably have sprung for the stacking plastic bins. THey look nicer and probably move a little easier. I do like the idea that mine was made mostly from stuff I had around the house. I think the felt cost about $5.





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TWILAQ1's Photo TWILAQ1 Posts: 497
5/22/11 1:53 P

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Linda - I have 3 worm bins going, and I know that in 4-5 months I'll need to separate the castings. I've had people tell me they put an old shower curtain on the floor, put on some good music, and pick worms out and plop them in the newly prepared bin. I worry about getting the tiny babies. What's your method?

Thanks,
Jodi

Stepping in a rhythm to a Kurtis Blow
Who needs to think when your feet just go

~Tom Tom Club (Genius of Love)


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5/21/11 5:29 P

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I don't sieve either my compost pile or my worm compost. If you put the lumps and stuff in now they will totally disappear by Fall. The microbes and worms in your soil continue to break it down through the summer.





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SHARJOPAUL's Photo SHARJOPAUL Posts: 32,148
5/21/11 3:50 P
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Using a sieve is a matter of personal choice. If your compost is going to be a top dressing that you want to look good, then using a sieve is probably a good idea. Otherwise the lumps are just some organic matter that has not decomposed as much as the rest of it. It will finish the job where you put it.
You can find compost sieves on line or make your own by making a frame from 2x2's and stapling hardware cloth to it. The one I made is a little wider than the cart I use to move compost from my bin to the area I want to use it, that way I can set in over the wagon and shovel the compost to it and the shake it until only the lumps remain.

JERIBERI1's Photo JERIBERI1 Posts: 10,529
5/21/11 10:45 A

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We've been doing it for years, and we just use a rake.

She woke up one morning and threw away all her excuses...
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UPCOMING RACES:
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Sep 13, 2015: Tri for Sight Sprint Tri
Oct 11, 2015: Iron Horse Half Marathon
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GARDENGIRL54's Photo GARDENGIRL54 Posts: 802
5/21/11 10:37 A

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I have been working with a compost pile for several years. When I apply it to my beds it still has clumps in it that I end up having to rake over to the side or pick out before I plant. Do those of you with more experience use a compost sieve to get out the clumps? If so, what do you find you like for this purpose?

Always lookiing to refine my craft! emoticon

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