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3/2/10 12:31 A

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Got a minute? That’s long enough to pull yourself back up

The Wt. Loss Minute By Linda Spangle, RN, MA
Author: 100 Days of Weight Loss
www.WeightLossJoy.com

Great idea: Remember times when you are at your BEST

Liz had a brand new suit. On the first day she wore it to work
she was determined to look great. She spent extra time on her
hair and makeup, and even searched out a pair of hose. The
suit was beautiful—dark navy with a subtle pinstripe, and the
double-breasted jacket and slim, calf-length skirt fit Liz perfectly.

As she walked down the hall toward her office, Liz waited for
someone to notice how wonderful she looked. It didn’t take
long. Dorothy, a fashion-conscious manager from accounting,
paused as she met Liz. ‘Nice suit,’ she said. Then her eyes
slid downward and she added, ‘But those shoes don’t seem to
work with it. Maybe a pair of smooth black pumps would help
pull it together.’

Liz choked out a quick ‘thank you,’ then stumbled toward her
office, closed the door, and burst into tears. Once again, she
had screwed up. ‘Why can’t I ever get it right? she wondered.
‘I try so hard to dress like a sharp, professional woman, but
I’ve failed at it again.’

The rest of the day, she kept feeling the sting of Dorothy’s
words. When she finally got home, Liz hung the suit in her
closet and never wore it again.

Ruined self-esteem

Now I’m going to tell you a secret. Liz was ME. This
experience actually happened to me many years ago when I
worked as a hospital health educator. And I never did wear
that suit again. A few months later, I gave it to one of my
sisters so it wouldn’t remind me of that awful day.

I still wish I’d had a better response to Dorothy’s
comments—some snappy comeback that would have let me ignore
what she said. But I got caught off guard by her words, and I
immediately concluded she must be right and that something was
wrong with me!

How many times have you done this? Instead of evaluating
whether a criticism is true, you assume it’s accurate and that
you are at fault. So when someone makes a snide comment about
your looks or your abilities, you add it to your list of
personal defects.

Each time you do this, your self-esteem gets weakened and, in
many cases, contributes to your heading for the refrigerator
or a bag of potato chips.

Of course, when you eat to cope with a poor self-image, you
gain more weight, which ultimately pulls your self-esteem even
lower. It’s hard to follow through with a weight-loss plan
when you’ve lost confidence in yourself.

Rebuild self-esteem

Here’s a simple exercise that can bring your self-esteem back
up almost instantly. It involves remembering periods in your
life when you’ve been living or performing at your best. This
also includes times when you’ve done something great or acted
with confidence and power.

Start by thinking about times in the past when you’ve been at
your best, such as when you were at a healthy weight or were
exercising regularly. Recall recent jobs or school years when
you were doing great work. Picture your best friendships or
the excitement of being in love.

Remember days you when you’ve felt confident, strong, capable,
and able to face challenges head on. Even if it’s been years
ago, think of times when you were truly at your best,
physically as well as mentally and emotionally.

In a notebook or on a piece of paper, write this phrase…

At my best, this is what I’m like:

Then write down every descriptive word and phrase you can
think of that would portray how you act, look, feel, or live
when you are at your best. Here’s an example from my own list.

At my best, here’s what I’m like:

• Energetic, bouncy, smile a lot, twinkly eyes
• Laugh easily, tell jokes, feel good physically
• Grounded, centered, confident about my abilities
• Productive, hard worker, accomplish a lot
• Blend well with people, relate easily, enjoy my friends
• Hug and cuddle my husband a lot, encourage sex and intimacy
• Connected spiritually, cultivate my faith, attend church regularly
• Physically strong, fit, flexible, play tennis and golf

Once you finish creating your own list, read it out loud and
notice the energy and enthusiasm it generates. Then use your
list as a guide to living each day in ways that match your
best self.

Remind yourself that all of those descriptive phrases are the
real you, even on days when you don’t feel or act like it. For
example, it you wrote that you are a patient person, yelling
at your children doesn’t mean your description isn’t true. It
just means you didn’t live out of your true self for that
particular moment.

Save your list and read it often, especially at times when
your self-esteem droops. By recalling your favorite
personality traits, you see who you really are as a person.
Holding this positive vision becomes critical to the
self-esteem component of how you ‘see’ yourself.

Want to comment on this e-zine? Click 'Reply' and send me a note.

Know others who've got a minute? Forward this ezine and
brighten their day.

To read previous issues:
http://shakerjardiet.com/index.php?page_
id=317


Elayne from
Florida Eastern Time Zone

" My goal is to live the truly religious life, and express it in my music. If you live it, when you play, there's no problem because the music is part of the whole thing. To be a musician is really something. It goes very,very deep. My music is the spiritual expression of what I am--my faith, my knowledge, my being." by John Coltrane

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life!.-Annonymous

Music is a moral l


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2/16/10 10:03 A

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Feb. 16

Got a minute? That’s long enough to celebrate your actions

The Wt. Loss Minute By Linda Spangle, RN, MA
Author: 100 Days of Weight Loss
www.WeightLossJoy.com

Great idea: Look for what goes right instead of what goes
wrong.

What do you look like today? I’m not referring to how you look
in the mirror, but how you SEE yourself in your own mind.

When you think about yourself right now, do you picture a
confident, slender, capable person? Or do you immediately see
someone who is fat, unattractive, or dumpy? What about clumsy
or awkward? Do you ever label yourself as lazy, unproductive,
or unsuccessful?

How you SEE yourself includes not only your physical
appearance, but also your competence, intelligence and your
life skills. When you hold a negative view of yourself, you
tend to match it by how you live.

Seeing affects doing

I’ve always been opposed to the concept of putting a pig on
your refrigerator door as a way to stop yourself from
overeating. Your brain can’t distinguish between a positive
image and a negative one, and it attempts to help you match
the pictures in front of it. So when it sees a pig every day,
your brain will think you want to be one.

Anytime you see yourself as ‘weak’ around food, you’re more
likely to overeat. When your primary mental picture of
yourself is a ‘fat slob,’ your efforts to lose weight will
usually fail.

To change the way you SEE yourself, you have create different
images. I’m not suggesting you pretend you’re thin when you
aren’t. But I encourage you to evaluate the way you view your
actions and your potential. Rather than dwelling on slip-ups
or failures, notice areas where you achieve success.

Small Wins

Janet was frustrated with her ‘wasted’ day. As she recalled
her struggles, I suggested she start at the beginning and
describe the entire day as she remembered it. Here’s what she said:

Yesterday was an awful day! I ate too much, I didn’t exercise,
I yelled at the kids, and I burned the dinner. Lately, every
day seems to be the same way—I have good intentions, but most
of the time I don’t follow through with any of them.

I guess I did a few things right. I cooked oatmeal for my
eight-year-old who loves it. I ran out the door to give my
husband the project book he’d forgotten on the kitchen table.
Then I sat on the patio with my coffee and did deep breathing
exercises while I appreciated the fresh morning air.

When I got to my job at the store, I listened to an employee
who had a sick child. I drank four glasses of water by noon,
made a telephone call to a depressed friend, called my husband
for an update on his stressful meeting, and wrote an outline
for my church women’s class. I ate cottage cheese and an apple
for lunch.

Once I got home, I picked up Jenny’s room to surprise her, let
my husband watch TV without interruption for an hour, and
trimmed off the overcooked areas of the casserole so my family
wouldn‘t have to eat them.

At this point in Janet’s story, I interrupted her. ‘Wait a
minute. I’m amazed at what a wonderful, caring, successful day
you had. A minute ago, you had a whole list of things that
went wrong. Where are they in this day?’

Janet thought and then quietly admitted, ‘I can’t remember any
of them!’

It’s easy to get hung up on the ‘bad’ things that happen and
see only your failures. To change this pattern, train yourself
to do the opposite and focus on the positive things or SMALL
WINS instead of minor slip-ups. Any positive actions or things
you contribute to during the day count as small wins.

Celebrate your success

Start noticing your small wins by writing down all of the good
things that happen. Make note of your actions as well as the
outcomes that result. Your list can include anything that
makes you feel productive, happy, or successful.

In the past, you may have followed a diet plan that required
you to write down everything you eat. Not this time! For your
small wins list, ignore any food struggles and instead record
only positive eating events or healthy foods.

Leave out the doughnuts you had this morning but list the
apple you ate at lunch. You can skip writing down the candy
bar you ate on the way home, but be sure to include the salad
you had at dinner.

At the end of the day, commend yourself for all of your
accomplishments. Keep this up for at least a week, perhaps
even several months.

Each night, read your list, out loud if possible, and notice
how it affects your attitude. Within even a few days, you will
start seeing yourself as a success instead of a failure.


Elayne from
Florida Eastern Time Zone

" My goal is to live the truly religious life, and express it in my music. If you live it, when you play, there's no problem because the music is part of the whole thing. To be a musician is really something. It goes very,very deep. My music is the spiritual expression of what I am--my faith, my knowledge, my being." by John Coltrane

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life!.-Annonymous

Music is a moral l


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ANGELBELIEVER's Photo ANGELBELIEVER SparkPoints: (56,225)
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Posts: 39,101
2/1/10 10:59 P

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Got a minute? That’s long enough to see your real beauty

The Wt. Loss Minute By Linda Spangle, RN, MA
Author: 100 Days of Weight Loss
www.WeightLossJoy.com

Great idea: Scrape off the dust and let yourself shine!

‘It was an awful week!’ Shelly told her weight-loss
counselor. “It started going bad when I found out that I
didn’t get the new position I’d applied for at work.’

She reached for a tissue to wipe her eyes and then continued,
‘I thought I’d done everything right, but somehow it
wasn’t enough. When my boss told me the news, my confidence
hit rock bottom.’

Shelly sighed. ‘That afternoon, I went home and started
eating and I don’t think I’ve stopped since! Last night,
my boyfriend and I had a terrible fight, and I know it was
because I was so down on myself. My weight is totally out of
control, my self-esteem is shot and I feel like a failure in everything!’

Who stole your self-esteem?

It’s funny how easy it is to let events or situations ruin
your confidence. Even when you’ve worked hard on building
your self-esteem, a simple negative comment can destroy your
inner spirit and send you running toward the refrigerator.

And it works, because food makes us feel good! When a
grueling experience devastates your confidence and self-trust,
food soothes the pain. It gives you the courage to face the
world again.

Of course, at the same time, overeating hurts your
self-esteem by making you feel disgusted and frustrated. Next
thing you know, you grab more food to appease these negative
feelings. And that just makes you feel even worse!

Regardless of your current life situation, you can still find
your inner spirit and rebuild your self-esteem. And it won’t
take years to accomplish. By making a few simple changes in
your self-talk and your internal beliefs, you can improve your
self-esteem almost immediately.

See your potential

Imagine you’re walking through a forest when you spot a
piece of wood nearly hidden in a pile of leaves. As you study
the layers of moss and caked-on dirt, you can’t see any
beauty in this scrap of wood and you question whether it has
any value.

But something compels you to pick it up and carry it home. In
your workshop, you carefully scrape off the dirt, then begin
sanding and polishing your wood. To your astonishment, you
uncover a deep grain filled with rich, beautiful colors.

As you continue restoring the wood, you start planning how
you could use it for some special purpose. Your excitement
builds as you envision creating a unique picture frame or a
graceful table leg. There’s no doubt in your mind that this
piece of wood has great value.

YOU are this piece of wood. Even when painful layers such as
your weight or other burdens cover your beauty, the real you
never leaves.

Your value as a person doesn’t change because of what you
look like or what happens to you. Beneath your discouragement
and low self-esteem, you are still you, as strong and vibrant
as ever.

Hanging on to your confidence

If you ever watch the TV show 'Dancing with the Stars,' you
certainly recognize confidence, self-esteem and inner
strength. The contestants never win by focusing on their
faults. Instead, they do lots of self-talk about their dancing
skills and how great they look. Then they go out and dance
like maniacs with total confidence and poise.

To help yourself focus on success, take the 'dancing
contestant' approach to managing your weight. Build an image
of being successful and tell yourself you are totally capable
of winning the weight loss contest. Then dance your way
through each day with a positive, confident attitude.

Think back to the earlier example of the piece of wood. You
may have to scrape off a few old beliefs and habits, but you
can build self-esteem that remains strong, no matter what
happens in your life.

Soon, your renewed self-image will add power to your efforts
for managing your weight.


Elayne from
Florida Eastern Time Zone

" My goal is to live the truly religious life, and express it in my music. If you live it, when you play, there's no problem because the music is part of the whole thing. To be a musician is really something. It goes very,very deep. My music is the spiritual expression of what I am--my faith, my knowledge, my being." by John Coltrane

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life!.-Annonymous

Music is a moral l


 current weight: 125.0 
 
135
132.5
130
127.5
125
ANGELBELIEVER's Photo ANGELBELIEVER SparkPoints: (56,225)
Fitness Minutes: (16,564)
Posts: 39,101
1/18/10 11:36 P

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Jan 18

Got a minute? That’s long enough to get out of your own way

The Wt. Loss Minute By Linda Spangle, RN, MA
Author: 100 Days of Weight Loss
www.WeightLossJoy.com

Great idea: Work on actions instead of excuses

Are you having trouble making progress with your goals? Maybe
you keep saying you want to lose weight or learn how to do
yoga. If you say you want to accomplish something but never do
it, take a look at the holes in your system.

Start with evaluating your goal. Is it really something you
want to do? How important is it to you? Do you need more time
or money to make it happen? Would it help to simplify your
goal or state it a different way?

Maybe you need to alter your plan to make it more palatable.
Doing a 30-minute run might seem like a wonderful goal, but if
you haven’t been exercising for several years, you may need
to initially set a goal of walking to the third cross street
or jogging as far as the church.

Here is a simple way to make it easier to achieve your goals.

Step 1: Set your intentions

Make your intentions specific and measurable. If you say you
want to ‘lose some weight,’ how will you know when
you’ve reached your goal? Instead, you might state your
intention as reaching a certain number on the scale or fitting
into a specific clothing size.

When you make your goals measurable, you can easily tell
whether or not you did them. For example, if you set an
intention of taking a walk today, by evening you can report
whether you took the walk or not.

Step 2: What will it take?

Once you’ve defined what you want to accomplish, write down
your intention, then ask, ‘What will it take to make this
happen?’ Come up with a specific action that will help you
follow through with your intention.

Label your answer ‘What will it take?’ As a shortcut, you
can use WWT to abbreviate the phrase. Each time you define
another action step, that statement becomes your new
intention. Then you have to decide on an action step for this
new goal.

Step 3: Keep asking WWT until you are forced to take action

As you set your intentions, keep asking, ‘What will it
take?’ over and over, each time moving closer toward an
action you can’t escape, no matter what. Label your final
action step as a NOW goal. Then get up from your chair and DO
it.

Here’s an example of how to set an intention you can’t
escape. Remember that each WWT answer becomes your next
intention.

Intention: Lose 40 pounds
WWT? Go back to the physician-based program I used before.
WWT? Call the doctor’s office for current information on
program times.
WWT? Find the phone number and call during lunch.
WWT? Get out the phone book and write the number down.
WWT? Get up from my desk and get the phone book off the
shelf.

Working your plan

If you set a reasonable intention but still don’t follow
through with it, you may have left too many gaps in your
action plan. Don’t allow yourself to get out of the job.
Keep digging deeper into the question ‘What will it take?’
until you find an action you can’t escape. Designate this
final one as a NOW goal, then complete the task immediately.

Setting intentions work for everything from tiny goals like
taking a walk to big plans such as losing 100 pounds or
participating in a race. Here are a couple more examples of
how to use this approach.

Intention: Get back on an exercise program
WWT? Renew my membership at the health club; work with a
personal trainer.
WWT? Stop at the club and sign up for a meeting with a
trainer.
WWT? Plan it into my schedule for sometime this week.
WWT? Pull out my schedule book and write it into a day that
works.
WWT? Do it now!

When your intentions center around changing your emotional
eating patterns, you can still focus on NOW goals. Simply
match them to what you need and feel, setting up actions that
prevent you from reaching for food

Intention: Manage emotional eating patterns
WWT? Figure out a way to stop using food to manage my
stress.
WWT? Come up with a better way to relax after work.
WWT? Use a journal to write out my feelings and thoughts
related to the day.
WWT? Go to the bookstore on Saturday to buy a new journal.
WWT? Tell the kids they can go with me and listen to
‘story hour.’

Remember, action leads to action. Build momentum by stepping
from one NOW goal to the next one on your list. Then work
through your new action plan until you’ve accomplished that
goal. Over time, this method can help you make phenomenal
progress in many areas of your life.

Want to comment on this ezine? Click 'Reply' and send me a note.

Know others who've got a minute? Forward this ezine and
brighten their day.

To read previous issues:
http://shakerjardiet.com/index.php?page_
id=317

© Linda Spangle, 2010. #0118, Weight Loss for Life, Inc.
5023 W. 120th Ave. #183, Broomfield, CO 80020
Contact: Linda@WeightLossJoy.com
www.weightlossjoy.com
303-452-1545 or 1-800-298-3020


Edited by: ANGELBELIEVER at: 1/18/2010 (23:37)
Elayne from
Florida Eastern Time Zone

" My goal is to live the truly religious life, and express it in my music. If you live it, when you play, there's no problem because the music is part of the whole thing. To be a musician is really something. It goes very,very deep. My music is the spiritual expression of what I am--my faith, my knowledge, my being." by John Coltrane

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life!.-Annonymous

Music is a moral l


 current weight: 125.0 
 
135
132.5
130
127.5
125
ANGELBELIEVER's Photo ANGELBELIEVER SparkPoints: (56,225)
Fitness Minutes: (16,564)
Posts: 39,101
11/24/09 12:24 P

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Nov. 24

Got a minute? That’s long enough to feel blessed

The Wt. Loss Minute By Linda Spangle, RN, MA
Author: 100 Days of Weight Loss
www.WeightLossJoy.com

Great idea: Celebrate the rainbows in your life

A few days ago, I had a very grouchy time. The news was full
of disasters or gloomy stories about people being out of work.
In my own life, lots of things seemed to be going wrong.

I was NOT feeling very thankful!

Today, everything changed. First of all, I am grateful to be
alive. A couple of hours ago, my sister and I were on the way
to a hair appointment. I was driving her SUV (sport utility
vehicle) for her when one of the tires blew out. It happened
while I was going 75 miles an hour on a very busy Interstate,
sandwiched between several huge semi-trucks.

By some miracle, I was able to pull off onto the shoulder of
the road without hitting anyone. As my sister and I stood in
shock, looking at the completely shredded tire, a small red
car zipped past in front of us, then pulled off the road and
instantly backed up.

A 20-something young man jumped out of the car and, after
looking at the damaged tire, offered to change it for us.
Without a word of complaint, he crawled under the vehicle to
retrieve the spare tire, then slid on the dirty ground in
order to slide the jack under the axel.

Within twenty minutes, this kind man had replaced the
destroyed tire with the spare one. Then, after telling us he
was glad he could help, jumped back into his little red car
and drove away.

NOW I am feeling extremely thankful!

I keep reviewing the list. I'm thankful the SUV stayed on the
road and we didn't get into a wreck that might have killed us.
I'm thankful the traffic had a small break that allowed me to
get off of the road so quickly. I'm thankful for God
protecting us and for sending the amazing soul who stopped and
changed the tire.

Now that I'm on a roll, I could write a list of hundreds of
things that I'm thankful for! I'm actually grateful for the
flat tire, because it helped me stop whining and instead,
start noticing the wonderful blessings in my life.

Here in America, we are getting ready to celebrate
Thanksgiving Day. For many people, this holiday is a time for
family gatherings and huge meals. But traditionally,
Thanksgiving is also a time to remember and celebrate
everything we feel grateful for and appreciate.

Even when your life feels bleak or discouraging, you can
always find a lot to be thankful for. You simply have to pay
closer attention and notice the good things you might
otherwise take for granted.

Watch for the rainbows

Today, start paying attention to all the positive things that
show up when you aren’t looking for them. Label these tiny
bright spots as RAINBOWS—gifts that slip in quietly, giving
you an emotional boost right in the middle of an otherwise
difficult day.

Cultivate a sense of gratitude about the simple things that
happen in your life. Be thankful each time that your children
arrive home safely after school. At bedtime, appreciate your
cozy blanket and the way your pillow fluffs up under your
head. Pay attention to these rainbows and consider all the
ways they help you feel better.

A list of rainbows

Now take this another step and start writing down all the
things you are thankful for. Watch for bits of joy, kindness
and beauty that cross your path. Keep your notebook handy this
week and record all of these special things.

Add people, events and/or places to your rainbow list.
Include your friends and family members. Then add
acquaintances such as the friendly neighbor who always waves
as you drive past.

Think about the subtle rainbows such as the person who
delivers your mail during the middle of a rainstorm or the
grocery clerk who slips your eggs into a separate bag to
protect them from breaking.

Fill in some of your journal pages with great memories and
events from the past. Recall favorite books that give you
great insight or music artists who move you to tears. At the
end of each day, read from your rainbow list and celebrate
what’s good in the world.

Cultivate being grateful

Anytime you’re tempted to eat as a way to cope with your
tight budget or other life challenges, get grateful instead.
You can instantly change your attitude as well as your actions
by simply going back to your rainbow list and reviewing the
good things in your life.
emoticon

Elayne from
Florida Eastern Time Zone

" My goal is to live the truly religious life, and express it in my music. If you live it, when you play, there's no problem because the music is part of the whole thing. To be a musician is really something. It goes very,very deep. My music is the spiritual expression of what I am--my faith, my knowledge, my being." by John Coltrane

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life!.-Annonymous

Music is a moral l


 current weight: 125.0 
 
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132.5
130
127.5
125
ANGELBELIEVER's Photo ANGELBELIEVER SparkPoints: (56,225)
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Posts: 39,101
11/10/09 12:18 A

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Got a minute? That’s long enough to overcome your excuses.

The Wt. Loss Minute By Linda Spangle, RN, MA
Author: 100 Days of Weight Loss
www.WeightLossJoy.com

Great idea: Never again say I CAN'T!

Do you typically put the words 'I can't' in front of your
goals? See if any of these comments sound familiar.

* I can’t stay on a diet.
* I can’t resist my mom’s desserts.
* I can’t stick to an exercise program.

Saying ‘I can’t’ reinforces the belief that you are
incapable of making progress. It also takes the blame off your
shoulders. You start believing that it’s not your fault
because after all, you ‘can't!’ So when it feels too hard
to stay on your diet plan, saying ‘I can’t’ gives you a
valid excuse to give up and eat.

I don’t want to!

Try this experiment. Next time you catch yourself saying ‘I
can’t,’ substitute the words ‘I DON’T WANT TO.’ Now
your phrases sound a lot different.

* I DON’T WANT TO stay on a diet.
* I DON’T WANT TO resist my mom’s desserts.
* I DON’T WANT TO stick to an exercise program.

Is that what you really want to say to yourself? I doubt it.

So here’s a healthier way to deal with your self-talk.
Switch the words ‘I can’t’ into ‘I’LL FIND A WAY!’
Notice the difference in how you feel when you use the
following statements.

* I’LL FIND A WAY to stay on a diet.
* When mom begs me to eat dessert, I’LL FIND A WAY to say
no to her.
* On busy days, I’LL FIND A WAY to exercise.

This simple wording change gives you a lot of power. Instead
of believing you’re stuck, you put yourself in charge and
create new options. Once you become determined to find a way,
you’ll start looking for solutions instead of believing
there aren’t any.

But I’ve ALWAYS been this way!

Suppose you start a new diet or exercise plan. Initially, you
feel excited and energized. But then a nagging voice reminds
you of your past failures. You’ve done this before. Many
times, you’ve started out strong but then lost your
motivation and quit.

Secretly, you worry that this time won’t be any different
from the others. So when you give in to a candy bar during a
bad day at work, you aren’t particularly surprised. Then,
since you’ve blown it anyway, you go ahead and eat pizza and
ice cream for dinner.

Soon you get frustrated because your new program isn’t
working and you stop completely. Just as you predicted, you
gave up on your diet like you ALWAYS do.

Focusing on memories of past failures puts you at risk for
repeating them. It’s time to change your belief that things
ALWAYS go a certain way or that you NEVER stay with your goals.

Here’s a critical truth to remember: Your past struggles
have no effect on your ability to succeed in the future.

Now I’m different!

Instead of reinforcing your beliefs that you always fail or
you never can resist food temptations, give yourself a new
message. Replace the words ALWAYS and NEVER with this new
phrase: I USED TO…, BUT NOW I’M DIFFERENT!

Example: I used to stop my exercise plan and never go back to
it, but now I’m different!

Next, create a new ending for your statement by adding,
‘These days, I…,’ then complete the sentence with your
new approach. Here are a couple of examples:

* If I fall off my exercise plan, I don’t just give up.
These days I take a long, contemplative walk and use it to get
myself going again.

* I used to eat whenever I felt stressed, but now I’m
different. These days, I play relaxing music or talk to one of
my friends to help manage my tension.

Any time you worry about repeating your failures, use this
great technique to create new behaviors. Watch for times when
you slip back into your old negative phrases, then immediately
replace them with the power words you learned today.
emoticon

Elayne from
Florida Eastern Time Zone

" My goal is to live the truly religious life, and express it in my music. If you live it, when you play, there's no problem because the music is part of the whole thing. To be a musician is really something. It goes very,very deep. My music is the spiritual expression of what I am--my faith, my knowledge, my being." by John Coltrane

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life!.-Annonymous

Music is a moral l


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10/26/09 4:32 P

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October 26

Got a minute? That’s long enough to change how you think.

The Wt. Loss Minute By Linda Spangle, RN, MA
Author: 100 Days of Weight Loss
www.WeightLossJoy.com

Great idea: CHOOSE all of your actions today!

As she sat down in my office, Patty said, ‘It was another
bad week on my diet. I didn’t really stick with it at all.
The problem is that I‘m so overwhelmed that I can’t even
see straight. By the way, I can’t stay long today because I
HAVE to run to pick up my daughter from a friend’s birthday party.’

‘What’s making you so overwhelmed?’ I asked. She
groaned and responded, ‘There just so many things I HAVE to
do right now. After I pick up my daughter, I HAVE to finish
the work project my boss assigned yesterday.

I also HAVE to get dinner started, help the kids with
homework, and start making their lunches for tomorrow. Oh
yes, I also HAVE to go to choir practice at church tonight.
So, can you see why I’m not making any progress on losing weight.’

‘You certainly are busy!’ I replied. ‘Tell me
something. Why are you even working on dieting right now?
Maybe you should take a break from it.’

‘Oh, but you don’t understand!’ she exclaimed. ‘I
just HAVE to lose this weight. I guess that means I HAVE to
get my exercise in yet today as well. But the thought of
having to do one more thing just makes me want to eat a bag
of cookies!’

Like Patty, do you feel overwhelmed with the number of things
you HAVE to do? We tend to use the words ‘have to’ for
almost everything. But think about how you respond mentally
when you say ‘I have to lose weight’ or ‘I have to exercise.’

Most of us don’t like being told we ‘have to’ do
anything. In fact, that little phrase often makes you rebel
and do the opposite. ‘I have to lose weight, but I don’t
feel like it, so I’m going to eat a candy bar.’

No more HAVE to

The real truth is you don’t actually HAVE to do anything.
This includes going to work, cleaning the house, or even
feeding the dog. You CHOOSE to do these things because you
want the outcomes or prefer the results that you get from
doing them.

For example, you choose to go to work because you like
getting a paycheck. You choose to pick up your daughter
because you love her and want to take care of her. And you
choose to lose weight because you want improved health and
better self-esteem.

Starting today, instead of saying, ‘I have to,’ when
discussing your actions or goals, substitute the words ‘I
choose to.’ Now the phrase ‘I have to lose weight,’
becomes ‘I choose to lose weight.’ You make this choice
because you want the outcome of feeling better physically or
fitting into the clothes hanging in your closet.

Instead of saying ‘I have to take a walk today,’ switch
to ‘I choose to walk today. I want to build my fitness
level and improve my energy.’ Saying ‘I choose to’
takes away the parental language that makes you feel
oppressed or rebellious. It also puts you in charge of your
own behavior, giving you more incentive to follow through
with your plan.

Choose your actions

To help you see the difference in this wording change, read
each of these phrases twice. The first time, use the words
‘I have to…,’ The second time, replace them with ‘I choose to.’

I have to (vs. I choose to)
…go to work
…stay on my diet plan
…stop yelling at my kids
…clean my house
…exercise today

Practice this until you feel comfortable with it. For one
entire day, refer to everything you do as a choice. Say ‘I
choose to get up early for my meeting’ or ‘I choose to
sit here at my desk and type this report.’ Notice the sense
of empowerment you get from choosing to do activities
compared to thinking you have to do them?

You can’t force yourself to lose weight or to stay on a
diet by saying ‘I have to.’ So start eliminating the
harsh, parental self-talk that makes you feel oppressed or
rebellious. Any time you feel like you HAVE to do something,
say ‘I choose to’ then take steps that move you toward
the outcomes you want.

Know others who've got a minute? Forward this ezine and
brighten their day.

Want to comment on this ezine? Click 'Reply' and send me a
note.

This every-other-week ezine is currently focusing on the
challenges of emotional eating and other psychological
issues. The content is based on excerpts from my book ‘Life
is Hard, Food is Easy: The 5-Step Plan to Overcome Emotional
Eating.’

Contact: Linda@WeightLossJoy.com
www.weightlossjoy.com

Elayne from
Florida Eastern Time Zone

" My goal is to live the truly religious life, and express it in my music. If you live it, when you play, there's no problem because the music is part of the whole thing. To be a musician is really something. It goes very,very deep. My music is the spiritual expression of what I am--my faith, my knowledge, my being." by John Coltrane

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life!.-Annonymous

Music is a moral l


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10/12/09 1:20 P

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Oct. 12

The Wt. Loss Minute By Linda Spangle, RN, MA
Author: 100 Days of Weight Loss
www.WeightLossJoy.com

Great idea: Today, let something be imperfect!

A few months ago, Bob decided he was ready to start an exercise
program. Many years ago, he had been somewhat athletic, and he
longed to return to being the active, in-shape person he used to be.

After several days of planning his new exercise routine, Bob was
ready to begin. First he bought a lot of expensive equipment and
installed it in a special carpeted area of his basement. Then he
laid out a phenomenal workout, one that would ultimately give him
the toned body of a Greek god.

His daily regimen would start with 20 minutes of gentle warm-up,
then move into an intense cardiovascular workout that included
half an hour on the treadmill and another 30 minutes on an
exercise bike.

After that, he would shift to his weight-lifting program, a
meticulously planned routine that worked all of the major muscle
groups in exactly the right order. His program would finish with
stretching and a gentle walk to cool down. Bob’s two-hour
routine was thorough and perfect for transforming him into a
strong, fit individual.

There was only one problem. Three months after he set up his
ideal exercise program, Bob still had not done it. Not even once.
You see, he could never find a two-hour block of time when he
could do the whole routine. So until the day came when he could
do the entire program as he’d designed it, he couldn’t get
himself to exercise at all.

Have you ever been caught in this pattern? As you know,
perfectionism is great if you can make it work for you. But like
Bob’s ‘all or nothing’ approach, it can also keep you from
taking any action at all.

Step into the gray!

Perfectionism usually involves ‘black and white thinking.’
You either do the whole thing (white) or you don’t do it at all
(black). In between these two extremes lies a gray area, a place
perfectionists hate to enter.

In my meeting with Bob, I showed him a how this principle works.

WHITE (GRAY) BLACK

To accomplish his goals, I told Bob he didn’t need to move
entirely from one extreme to the other. He just needed to put ONE
FOOT into the gray area.

This meant he had to be willing to break his wonderful exercise
regimen into more manageable parts. Then on days when he
couldn’t complete the entire routine, he could simply do part
of his workout.

Bob struggled with this concept because his brain still wanted
to do the ‘perfect’ program. But he also recognized his rigid
plan kept him from making any progress at all. So he chose to
‘step into the gray’ instead of eliminating his entire workout.

After studying his exercise plan, Bob determined he could divide
it into 20-minute segments. He gave himself the option of doing
only one segment on days when he didn’t have time for the whole
thing.

A couple of months later, Bob reported he’d lost 20 pounds and
that he was thrilled with his how his workouts were going. By
changing his expectation of being perfect, he was able to do a
solid 20 minutes of exercise on days he otherwise would have
skipped.

If you tend to get stuck because of being a perfectionist,
experiment with putting one foot into the gray. For example,
instead of expecting yourself to NEVER eat when you aren’t
hungry, allow for a few exceptions.

In areas such as exercise or meal planning, figure out how to
make a small amount of progress, then label yourself as
successful. By letting go of your rigid rules and expectations,
you will achieve a much healthier balance in nearly every area of
your life.

Perfectionism is a GIFT!

Perfectionism isn't all bad. In many areas of life, it can help
you accomplish things you wouldn’t achieve otherwise. Rather
than try to eliminate perfectionism completely, simply treat it
as a wonderful gift. Then decide when it makes sense to use your
gift and when you need to store it on a shelf. In other words,
draw on perfectionism when it matters, but other times choose to
let it go.

If you’re determined to be successful long-term with managing
your weight, here’s what I suggest. Let go of your rigid
standards, and set a goal of striving for EXCELLENCE instead of
perfectionism.

You can figure out a way to achieve excellence with almost
anything you do. And with excellence, you can hold high standards
and strive for doing things well. But you can also allow yourself
the option of ‘missing’ by just a little.

By eliminating the roadblock of perfectionism, you will get far
more success in your weight management efforts as well as many
other areas of your life.

Know others who've got a minute? Forward this ezine and brighten
their day.

Want to comment on this ezine? Click 'Reply' and send me a note.

This ezine is currently focusing on the challenges of emotional
eating and other psychological issues. The content is based on
excerpts from my book ‘Life is Hard, Food is Easy: The 5-Step
Plan to Overcome Emotional Eating.’


Edited by: ANGELBELIEVER at: 10/12/2009 (13:20)
Elayne from
Florida Eastern Time Zone

" My goal is to live the truly religious life, and express it in my music. If you live it, when you play, there's no problem because the music is part of the whole thing. To be a musician is really something. It goes very,very deep. My music is the spiritual expression of what I am--my faith, my knowledge, my being." by John Coltrane

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life!.-Annonymous

Music is a moral l


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9/15/09 3:11 P

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Sept 15
Got a minute? That’s long enough to say NO.

The Wt. Loss Minute By Linda Spangle, RN, MA
Author: 100 Days of Weight Loss
www.WeightLossJoy.com

Great idea: Take care of myself, not just everyone else!

It seemed that every time Marilyn started a new diet plan,
someone around her would have a crisis. She kept hoping her
children would grow up and take care of their own lives. But
they didn’t. And whenever they had problems, Marilyn not
only rushed in to help, she ate.

Marilyn said, ‘A couple months ago, my adult daughter went
through a nasty break-up with her boyfriend. For several
weeks, I went over to her place every day, and when she cried,
I cried with her. Then we’d get out the ice cream and eat
until we both felt better.’

Marilyn believed she was being a concerned and caring parent.
But she admitted that she also struggled with saying ‘no’
to other people in her life such as her mother and her boss.
In reality, she had become so hooked into other people’s
lives that she had no concept of her own identify.

When I asked Marilyn to write a list of her own needs, she
couldn’t think of a single one that didn’t relate to
fixing someone else’s problems. She began to realize that
the only way she got her own needs met was with food and eating.

The people hook

Marilyn has become a victim of what I call the ‘people
hook.’ Other people and their problems constantly pull her
into feeling distraught, worried, and upset. At the same time,
she also gets hooked into trying to fix all of their dilemmas.

Here’s how the people hook starts. You care about your
friends or family members, so it troubles you when they have a
bad time. You also want to be helpful and kind during their
struggles, so you make phone calls, meet them for coffee, and
listen to their problems.

When you’re emotionally healthy, you’re able to share
their sadness or show concern, but then return home and take
care of yourself. You also set limits on how much you do for
others, and you assume that how people cope with life is their
responsibility, not yours.

But over time, it’s easy lose sight of your role. As you
fret about your mother or your grown children, you end up
constantly investing in them instead of yourself. Every new
crisis pulls you further into their struggles, causing you to
become even more distraught. Whenever you need to escape or
get relief from the stress, you reach for something to eat.

Where did you go?

When you become ’over hooked’ in other people’s lives,
you eventually lose sight of yourself and your own needs.
Eventually, you become so lost in other people’s problems
that your own self-esteem and confidence fades away.

Perhaps you assume that, after all you’ve done for them,
people will be obligated to give back to you, or to love you
more. Unfortunately, you seldom get the payback you hoped for.

Often, the people you gave so much time, energy, or money to
will simply ignore you and go about their own lives. Soon you
start feeling resentful because people you helped don’t
appreciate it and they simply take you for granted. When you
don’t get the gratitude or attention you anticipated, it’s
easy to look for it in food.

Time to get unhooked

Look carefully at whether ‘people hooks’ are driving your
emotional eating. If you feel like you’ve lost yourself as a
result of taking care of others, you may have to make some
hard choices around the people in your life. This may mean
forcing them to manage their lives without your constant help.

You may also have to stop letting other people’s problems
devastate you. When your friends or family members call with
another dilemma, decide where you can contribute and where you
need to back off. Encourage people around you to take
responsibility for themselves. And learn to say ‘no’ once
in a while instead of always trying to keep everybody happy.

You can still care about people you love. Just don’t let
yourself disappear in the process. Go back to letting your
real self emerge from behind other people’s needs. Keep in
mind that no matter what type of problems you’re dealing
with it’s not your job to fix people. Your job is simply to
love them!
emoticon

Elayne from
Florida Eastern Time Zone

" My goal is to live the truly religious life, and express it in my music. If you live it, when you play, there's no problem because the music is part of the whole thing. To be a musician is really something. It goes very,very deep. My music is the spiritual expression of what I am--my faith, my knowledge, my being." by John Coltrane

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life!.-Annonymous

Music is a moral l


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8/31/09 3:30 P

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Got a minute? That’s long enough to let go of deprivation.

The Wt. Loss Minute By Linda Spangle, RN, MA
Author: 100 Days of Weight Loss
www.WeightLossJoy.com

Great idea: Deprivation makes life good!

Michelle was frustrated! Every time she tried to diet, she
ended up feeling deprived. After a few days of torture,
she’d give in and eat the foods she’d been craving. Of
course, she’d eat a LOT of food and end up undoing all the
hard work on her diet.

What is it about deprivation that makes us want to eat MORE?
And is it better to eat the foods you crave or should you try
to be strong and resist all those temptations? Michelle
certainly wasn’t feeling good about her decisions around
managing this.

She told me, ‘I once read a book that suggested giving in
to food cravings rather than depriving yourself. It said to
identify the food you really wanted, then go ahead and eat it.
Supposedly, eating what you want would stop your craving
because you would no longer feel deprived of the food.

One afternoon, I decided I was craving a brownie, so I ate
one. Once I finished it, I realized that it wasn’t quite
what I’d wanted. Instead, I was actually hungry for Oreo
cookies. After eating a bunch of cookies, I sensed they
weren’t exactly what I wanted either.

Then, I figured out that I really wanted was something
crunchy like M&Ms. So I got out a bag of those and finished
them off. That still didn’t quite do it. I don’t
understand why the principle of EAT WHAT YOU WANT doesn’t
seem to work for me.’

Every one else is eating, so why can’t I?

Suppose you hosted a birthday party where everyone ate ice
cream and cake while you just drink black coffee? You want to
stay on your diet, but watching everyone eat makes you feel
deprived and left out.

After the guests have gone home, you sneak into the kitchen
and eat three pieces of birthday cake. After all, you deserve
to have a little fun too, don’t you?

In the past few years, numerous diet books have proclaimed
‘diets don’t work’ and the authors have coaxed us to
never diet again. Theoretically, following a rigid diet plan
can cause a sense of deprivation that later contributes to
throwing out the rules and overeating.

For some people, this may be true. But at the same time,
successfully losing weight requires that you set boundaries
around your eating. Even if it makes you feel deprived, you
will sometimes need to turn down a piece of cake or a bowl of
ice cream.

Deprivation is part of life…

In reality, maybe deprivation isn’t all that bad. In life,
you deprive yourself of a lot of things because you prefer the
benefits you get as a result.

For example, to stay in a monogamous relationship, you
deprive yourself of the pleasure of having sex with other
people. When you accept a full-time job, you give up spending
your days skiing or playing at the beach. You are willing to
sacrifice these things because you prefer the outcomes of
staying married or getting a paycheck.

Instead of worrying about feeling deprived, define the
boundaries that will keep you moving toward your goals. Like
traffic laws or school attendance policies, setting a few
rules around eating keeps you from destroying your plans for
staying healthy.

Maybe you’ve tried giving yourself ‘permission’ to eat
certain foods because that’s supposed to stop cravings. But
next time you feel deprived, look beyond your food thoughts,
and consider what you might need emotionally.

Do you miss the way ice cream soothes your broken heart? Were
potato chips and beer your main source of relieving stress?
Perhaps you’re just bored or lonely or feeling empty right now.

Instead of giving in to your food craving, do something to
take care of your emotional needs. Let music, exercise or
other nurturing activities fill your spirit rather than taking
the easy way out by reaching for something to eat.

Where else am I deprived?

Instead of getting hung up on feeling deprived around certain
foods, switch it around by asking, ‘What does my weight
deprive me of?’ Then make a list of all the areas in your
life that are lacking because of you being overweight.

Are you are missing out on fun activities because it’s too
hard to participate? Does your size keep you from achieving
some of your dreams and goals? Perhaps your self-esteem
struggles deprive you of pursuing a different job or new relationships.

Make a decision to begin changing these things today! When
you take steps to relieve the emotional pain of being
overweight, the minor deprivation from skipping a piece of
cake will start to seem pretty unimportant.

Elayne from
Florida Eastern Time Zone

" My goal is to live the truly religious life, and express it in my music. If you live it, when you play, there's no problem because the music is part of the whole thing. To be a musician is really something. It goes very,very deep. My music is the spiritual expression of what I am--my faith, my knowledge, my being." by John Coltrane

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life!.-Annonymous

Music is a moral l


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thanks for sharing

DEE Southern New Jersey
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Losing Weight & Disabled
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Faith makes all thing possible
Love makes all things happen
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God is Good all the time. All the time GOD is good.

Let your life be like Angel Food Cake...sweet and Light---




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8/17/09 4:08 P

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Got a minute? That's long enough to do something hard!

The Wt. Loss Minute By Linda Spangle, RN, MA
Author: 100 Days of Weight Loss
www.WeightLossJoy.com

Great idea: Remind yourself that you can do hard things!

Miriam was ready to give up. She sank into my office chair
with a big sigh, and said, 'Each time I start a new diet, I
get discouraged and quit. It's partly because I always slide
back into my patterns of emotional eating. But the real
reason I'm not making progress is because IT'S JUST TOO HARD!'

And she's right! It is hard. But the truth is, a lot of
things in life are hard. As an author, I often get
discouraged with how hard it is to consistently stick with my
writing efforts. Prolific writer, Natalie Goldberg, says, 'If
writing was easy, everyone would do it.'

In a similar way, if losing weight was easy, there wouldn't
be so many overweight people in the world. It's not easy, yet
at the same time, it can be done. If you are determined to
achieve your weight-loss goals, don't let the fact that it's
hard get in your way.

You can do hard things!

If you're like most people, you've done a lot of hard things
in your life. Look at the challenges of carrying a pregnancy,
giving birth, or caring for a sick child or an aging parent.
What about changing jobs, or moving across the country?
You've probably dealt with a lot of tough situations in your lifetime.

Make a list of some of the hard challenges you've faced in
your life, then remind yourself you can handle difficult
things. Regardless of your current weight or health status,
you are a strong and capable person. In fact, if you were
weak or lazy, you wouldn't be reading this newsletter.

When coping feels difficult, divide your emotional challenges
into small steps and tackle ones that seem easiest. Write or
review your list of 'things to do instead of eating,' then
choose one and focus on it until it becomes second nature.

For example, instead of immediately giving in when you get a
food craving, apply the "ten minute rule" and always wait ten
minutes before you eat something.

Ambivalence

Do you keep changing your mind about whether or not to go
back on a diet or start a new exercise program?
Unfortunately, being indecisive or uncertain about your goals
will usually kill your program. And if you feel the slightest
bit hesitant about working on emotional eating, you'll
probably continue reaching for food instead of tackling your issues.

Ambivalence keeps you STUCK. When you straddle the fence, the
slightest breeze knocks you over toward the side of giving
up. If you are determined to make changes in your life, kick
ambivalence out the window.

As you build your skills for conquering emotional eating,
always remind yourself that you are determined to make this
work. Then don't look back. Figure out how to achieve your
goals, no matter what!

No one takes care of me!

What do you do when your emotional support slips away? When
you go through a divorce or other relationship changes, you
can lose connections that nurtured you and made you feel
emotionally safe.

Jenny knew her mother wasn't able to give her much nurturing
anymore, but she couldn't figure out how to replace it.
Here's how she described her substitute for love:

One Saturday, I decided to visit to my aging mother, who was
in declining health. On the way to her home, I stopped at my
favorite bakery and picked up a couple of large chocolate
chip cookies.

When I bit into one of those soft, chewy cookies, I was
instantly overwhelmed by some of the most intense emotions I
have ever felt. It was as though every part of my body
suddenly filled with deep feelings of love and comfort. I
don't understand why they affected me this much but the
feelings were so powerful that I began to sob.

When Jenny thought about what happened, she realized the
cookies reminded her of how her mother had always loved her
and taken care of her. As her mother's health and mental
ability faded, so did her nurturing role. Jenny said, 'Since
Mom can't take care of me anymore, I let food do it instead.
I can't seem to stop eating those cookies because they
replace the only way I got nurtured and loved.

Like Jenny, you may have lost a relationship that provided
nurturing or comfort. Until you rebuild these missing areas
of your life, you risk using food to replace them. Don't give
up. Eventually the pain will heal and your ability to cope
without eating will return.

Elayne from
Florida Eastern Time Zone

" My goal is to live the truly religious life, and express it in my music. If you live it, when you play, there's no problem because the music is part of the whole thing. To be a musician is really something. It goes very,very deep. My music is the spiritual expression of what I am--my faith, my knowledge, my being." by John Coltrane

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life!.-Annonymous

Music is a moral l


 current weight: 125.0 
 
135
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God is Good all the time. All the time GOD is good.

Let your life be like Angel Food Cake...sweet and Light---




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Got a minute? That's long enough to take charge of your life

The Wt. Loss Minute By Linda Spangle, RN, MA
Author: 100 Days of Weight Loss
www.WeightLossJoy.com

Great idea: Start taking care of your needs

How do you change your eating patterns when your needs are so
great and food is so easy? When you can't find a minute to
yourself during the day, where do you start?

As hard as it is, you have to be willing to take charge of your
own life, including taking time for yourself. This may require
moving yourself up on your priority list, ahead of your aging
mother or your demanding boss.

Fixing your needs

Many of your needs can be handled by doing a simple action or
even changing your thinking. In the last ezine, I told you how
to write a list of needs.

(Here's a link to the ezine:
http://shakerjardiet.com/index.php?page_
id=389)

Take out the list of needs you wrote. Be sure you have written
'What do I need?' at the top of your list. Now add a column to
the other side of your paper and write at the top, 'How could I
get it?'

For each item on your list, identify what it would take to get
that specific need met, even partially, and record your answers.
Consider every possible solution that would help appease your
emotional needs, at least long enough to keep you out of the
refrigerator.

Remember Gary's list? (see the previous ezine)

Many of his needs related to his current job and the pressures
of his finances and his family life. He knew that, eventually,
he wanted to find a lower stress job closer to his home.

But in the meantime, he had to make some changes that would meet
his needs right now. Using the questions, 'what do I need' and
'how could I get it,' here's what he came up with:

Time - Limit my private practice to two nights a week
Closeness - Set up a date night with my wife
Connection - Plan lunch with my professor from graduate school
Meaning - Skip TV; instead play games with kids or read
Fun - Listen to my opera CD's during my commute
Hope - Talk with my wife about our long-term plans
Feel settled - Slow down, live more in the present moment

Within a week, Gary felt more in charge of his life again and he
began looking at how he could make other changes as well. He
said, 'Doing those simple things took away a lot of the food
cravings I'd been fighting for so long. Instead of eating to
make my life go away, I discovered I had the power to heal my
own pain.'

Make It Happen

Once you create solutions that would meet your needs, make them
happen.

* Take a walk
* Close your office door
* Hug your child

Often one simple action can redirect how you manage your entire
day. What seemed so overwhelming that you had push it away with
food suddenly becomes more bearable.

You can use these exercises in many ways, from thinking about
life in general to focusing on a very specific problem or event.
When you wake up in the morning, ask yourself 'What do I need
today?' If you are going to a party or visiting your mother,
consider the question, 'What do I need during this specific
time?'

It's up to you

As much as you wish someone else would fix your life, ultimately
you have to do it yourself. Even if you believe that your family
or boss or lover 'should' do more for you, other people can
never fill all the gaps in your life. It's up to you to figure
out how to get your needs met.

You may find this difficult to accept. Perhaps you feel angry or
resentful that people around you aren't doing their part to meet
your needs. But you can waste a lot of energy and time being
angry that the world isn't taking care of you. Instead of
wishing other people would do more for you, look for creative
ways to manage your needs by yourself.

Meeting your own needs requires courage and determination, and
in some cases, a major shift in how you approach life. Be
willing to step in and make some hard choices about your life.
If you don't, you risk more years going by without anything
changing.

Take charge of your own life. Any time you start searching for
food when you know you aren't hungry, stop and ask yourself what
you need. By taking a few minutes to identify what's behind your
desire to eat, you postpone grabbing food and instead, take care
of what you really wanted in the first place.


Next ezine: Getting past your barriers

Know others who've got a minute? Forward this ezine and brighten
their day.

Want to comment on this ezine? Click 'Reply' and send me a note.
(I'll be out of the office on vacation from July 21-28, so won't
be sending a response note back.)

During 2009, this ezine is focusing on the challenges of
emotional eating and other psychological issues. The content is
based on excerpts from my book 'Life is Hard, Food is Easy: The
5-Step Plan to Overcome Emotional Eating.'

Also, during the summer, this newsletter goes out every other
week instead of weekly.

To read previous issues:
http://www.rapidwtloss.com/index.php?pag
e_id=289

© Linda Spangle, 2009. #0720, Weight Loss for Life, Inc.
5023 W. 120th Ave. #183, Broomfield, CO 80020
Contact: Linda@WeightLossJoy.com
www.weightlossjoy.com
303-452-1545 or 1-800-298-3020


Elayne from
Florida Eastern Time Zone

" My goal is to live the truly religious life, and express it in my music. If you live it, when you play, there's no problem because the music is part of the whole thing. To be a musician is really something. It goes very,very deep. My music is the spiritual expression of what I am--my faith, my knowledge, my being." by John Coltrane

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life!.-Annonymous

Music is a moral l


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emoticon to you for sharing, Angelbeliever!

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thank you for sharing

DEE Southern New Jersey
CARETAKER'S OF OUR LOVE ONE'S
SP Class of Oct 12-18 2008.
Losing Weight & Disabled
Menopause & Losing
Secrets of Life
Grandpas & Grandmas Are Special
40s & up...Sculpting a new U

Faith makes all thing possible
Love makes all things happen
Hope makes all things work

God is Good all the time. All the time GOD is good.

Let your life be like Angel Food Cake...sweet and Light---




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June 29

Got a minute? That's long enough to make a list of needs

The Wt. Loss Minute By Linda Spangle, RN, MA
Author: 100 Days of Weight Loss
www.WeightLossJoy.com

Great idea: Figure out what you need today

I just got home from the grocery store where I had a really
close call. I needed only a few items such as fruit, milk,
and laundry detergent. But at the bakery section, I studied
the choices for several minutes and then reached for a
cream-filled pastry.

WAIT! I didn't really want to eat a huge pastry. And I knew
that I had to escape quickly before the bakery sucked me into
its jaws. But I wondered why it was so tempting today. Then I
remembered that when I'm craving sweets and bakery foods, I'm
usually wanting to feel nurtured or comforted in some way.

OK, I thought. The pastry won't really change that need. So
instead, I left it at the store and on the drive home thought
about a few other ways I could get those needs met. (No
answer yet- I'm still thinking!) But at least I had
identified what was prompting my food thoughts.

Before you can resolve your needs in ways that don't involve
food, you need to become skilled at knowing WHAT you are
trying to fix. Here's a great method for identifying what you need.

What Do I Need?

At the top of a blank piece of paper write the question 'What
do I need?' Focusing on the present moment as well as life in
general, think about where you are lacking or missing
something. Take a few deep breaths to relax, then ask
yourself, 'What do I need?'

Using one or two words or short phrases, make a list of all
the needs you can think of. Consider needs related to your
weight, self-esteem, stress, job, or relationship issues, as
well as personal concerns. Include small needs such as money
or rest as well as complex ones such as a new job or a
different life partner.

Don't worry about providing explanations or long
descriptions; just make a simple list of what you need. If
you get stuck, prompt your thinking by asking, 'What else do
I need?'

Once you are finished, read through the needs you identified.
Most likely, your initial list will include things such as
the desire for nurturing, less stress, more money, etc. You
may also find words such as safety, affirmation, intimacy, or
even escape.

A big list

Gary, a psychologist with a busy, private practice says, 'I
don't know how my life got so out of hand. My days fly by,
but I never get caught up with all my tasks. I feel like I'm
missing a lot of things and I suspect I'm using food to
replace them.'

Here's Gary's list of needs:

* Time- I wish I wasn't always behind and trying to get
caught up.
* Closeness-I want more intimacy with my wife, feeling closer
to my kids.
* Connection-I want time with people who are authentic,
encouraging and not so demanding.
* Fun- I want more enjoyment out of life and not so burdened
by all my required activities.
* Hope-I want to see the potential for life get better
instead of being so pessimistic about it.
* Feel settled-Rather than instead of restless and constantly
searching for meaning and peacefulness.

As he reviewed his list, Gary began to understand what food
was doing for him. It was taking the place of everything he
yearned for in life but didn't have.

Reviewing your needs

You can do the exercise "What do I need?" anytime and
anywhere. Although it can be helpful to write down your
needs, you don't always have to do that. Instead, you can
mentally list your needs while you are driving to work or
waiting for an appointment.

Identifying what you need won't always stop you from
emotional eating, but at least it will help you see the
connection of how food takes care of you.

After her divorce, Kaye struggled a lot with weight gain
related to emotional eating. Kaye said, 'I miss a lot of
things I used to have in my life. I wish I had time to sit
outside under a tree and read a good book. I miss being held,
making those special dinners, being appreciated, having a
slow day.

But since I can't seem to get those things, I reach for food
instead. A bag of chips or cookies replaces the bubbly home I
wish I had. Snacks in my work drawer fill in for the
compliments I'm not getting. The bowl of ice cream late at
night takes the place of arms around me.'

No quick fix

Don't get hung up saying "I can't do anything about that!"
Right now, your task is to identify exactly what is
contributing to your emotional eating. You won't be able to
fix all of these needs right away, but knowing what they are
will help you recognize where to start making changes.

Next ezine: Simple ways to get your needs met

Know others who've got a minute? Forward this ezine and
brighten their day.

Want to comment on this ezine? Click 'Reply' and send me a note.

During 2009, this ezine is focusing on the challenges of
emotional eating and other psychological issues. The content
is based on excerpts from my book 'Life is Hard, Food is
Easy: The 5-Step Plan to Overcome Emotional Eating.'

Also, during the summer, this newsletter goes out every other
week instead of weekly.

To read previous issues:
http://www.rapidwtloss.com/index.php?pag
e_id=289

Elayne from
Florida Eastern Time Zone

" My goal is to live the truly religious life, and express it in my music. If you live it, when you play, there's no problem because the music is part of the whole thing. To be a musician is really something. It goes very,very deep. My music is the spiritual expression of what I am--my faith, my knowledge, my being." by John Coltrane

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life!.-Annonymous

Music is a moral l


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6/23/09 10:42 A

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Great one! Thanks!!

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Motivation & So Much More
teams.sparkpeople.com/MM
Fabulous 40s, 50s & Up
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6/22/09 10:55 P
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thank you for sharing

DEE Southern New Jersey
CARETAKER'S OF OUR LOVE ONE'S
SP Class of Oct 12-18 2008.
Losing Weight & Disabled
Menopause & Losing
Secrets of Life
Grandpas & Grandmas Are Special
40s & up...Sculpting a new U

Faith makes all thing possible
Love makes all things happen
Hope makes all things work

God is Good all the time. All the time GOD is good.

Let your life be like Angel Food Cake...sweet and Light---




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These are fabulous! Thanks so much for sharing.

~Kimmie


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June 1

Got a minute? That's long enough to skip the cake...

The Wt. Loss Minute By Linda Spangle, RN, MA
Author: 100 Days of Weight Loss
www.WeightLossJoy.com

Great idea: Stop eating to please other people

Come on, eat some more!

* What's the matter, don't you like my food? I thought this
was your favorite
* I made this cherry pie just for you. What do you mean you
don't want any?
* Come on, everyone else is eating. Besides, we have to celebrate!

Did any of those lines sound familiar? Most of us don't like
conflict, so when someone tells us to eat, we do it. We so
easily get caught up in pleasing other people, even when that
causes us to overeat. We also know that resisting could mean
we'll have to deal with someone acting insulted or feeling hurt.

Families often have unspoken expectations around food. At
family gatherings, people may expect you to stuff yourself
with pasta or ice cream because 'this is how we always eat.'

Once you give in, you may conclude it wasn't your fault. My
clients will often defend themselves by saying, 'What was I
supposed to do? They begged me to join them and I didn't want
to hurt their feelings.'

Giving away your power

When you eat because it's EXPECTED, you give power to someone
else instead of making your own decisions about your body.
Eating to please others ultimately damages your self-esteem
as well as your weight.

Barbara explained it this way. 'For years, I endured the
glares and snide comments that my husband's relatives made
whenever I tried to lose weight. Usually, I'd just give in
and take second helpings and eat dessert along with everyone else.

One day, it hit me that by eating to please my in-laws, I was
giving them a lot of power. I got angry as I thought about
all the years I'd sacrificed my weight-loss goals to keep
peace in the family. So I made a decision that I would take
care of myself and my needs instead of eating to please them.
It took a while, but eventually they stopped pushing me to
eat the way they did.'

I need to connect

Some years ago, I routinely met a good friend at a local
coffee shop where we would catch up on the events of the
week. Often my friend would debate whether or not to order a
doughnut. Because I wanted to feel close to her, I would gave
in and say, 'If you want a doughnut, I'll have one with you.'

After a while, I realized that my desire to CONNECT was
ruining my diet plan. So I changed my approach and simply
said, 'Go ahead and have one if you like. I'm not that hungry
today, so I'll just have coffee.'

Sometimes your efforts to connect don't even work. After a
disappointing date or a dull party, you may still yearn to
feel close to people. Even texting or chatting on the
internet can leave you feeling lonely and unsatisfied once
you sign off. Heading to the refrigerator might seem like a
good solution, but food can't make up for the absence of good
companionship or meaningful conversations.

It's not my fault!

Wouldn't it be nice if being overweight wasn't really your
fault? You could simply explain that you have a weight
problem because your mother (or boyfriend or boss) always
insists that you eat. But it doesn't work that way.

Whenever you eat to avoid hurting people's feelings, you hurt
yourself instead. While blaming someone else for your weight
problem might sound legitimate, it simply allows you to avoid
taking responsibility for your own actions.

Pam said, 'Whenever I fell off my diet, I'd always blame
other people such as my friends or my family. I convinced
myself 'they' were the reason I failed. Finally I realized
that no one was going to do this for me. I had to face my
problems honestly and figure out how to make my plan work.'

But it's someone's birthday!

Whoever came up with the rule that you have to eat cake for
everyone's birthday? You don't have to compromise your eating
goals just because someone becomes a year older. To me, this
excuse makes as much sense as trying to talk your way out of
a speeding ticket by blaming the person who was tailgating you.

Instead of automatically joining birthday celebrations,
become selective about the people you will eat cake for. You
might decide to skip it for anyone who isn't a relative or
for any children under the age of six. Or you can honor the
birthday individual by eating a few bites of cake instead of
a whole piece.

Here's a way to make a little game out this. At birthday
celebrations, cut off a piece of cake that is only one or two
inches square. Plan to take the final bite of your cake at
the same time the last person in the group finishes eating.

If you are at a gathering with small children, this can take
a long time. You may have to be very patient as you wait for
them to stop playing and finish their cake. But it's a great
way to manage your calories as well as prevent taking another piece.

Next ezine: Sneaky emotional needs

Know others who've got a minute? Forward this ezine and
brighten their day.

Want to comment on this ezine? Click 'Reply' and send me a
note.

During 2009, this ezine is focusing on the challenges of
emotional eating and other psychological issues. The content
is based on excerpts from my book 'Life is Hard, Food is
Easy: The 5-Step Plan to Overcome Emotional Eating.'

Also, during the summer, this newsletter goes out every other
week instead of weekly.

To read previous issues:
http://www.rapidwtloss.com/index.php?pag
e_id=289

© Linda Spangle, 2009. #0601, Weight Loss for Life, Inc.
5023 W. 120th Ave. #183, Broomfield, CO 80020
Contact: Linda@WeightLossJoy.com
www.weightlossjoy.com

Elayne from
Florida Eastern Time Zone

" My goal is to live the truly religious life, and express it in my music. If you live it, when you play, there's no problem because the music is part of the whole thing. To be a musician is really something. It goes very,very deep. My music is the spiritual expression of what I am--my faith, my knowledge, my being." by John Coltrane

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life!.-Annonymous

Music is a moral l


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May 19

Got a minute? That's long enough to have some fun!

The Wt. Loss Minute By Linda Spangle, RN, MA
Author: 100 Days of Weight Loss
www.WeightLossJoy.com

Great idea: Create non-food ways to have pleasure and fun

Emotional needs come in all levels, from being bored or stressed
to complex issues such as wanting to find a new relationship or
make peace with a family member. This week, we'll look at the
simple needs of fun and entertainment. Over the next couple
weeks, we'll add people needs and emotional needs to the list.

Food is fun!

Food gives us something to do! It entertains us with no strings
attached, has no ulterior motives, and requires nothing in
return. If you can't find anything you like on TV, you can
always raid the refrigerator until the programs change.

With food, you don't have to wait for the fun to begin. You
start getting enjoyment and satisfaction with the very first
bite of a cookie or candy bar. On rainy afternoons or long
weekends with no plans, food helps fill the empty time. Putting
food in your mouth makes the world become more bearable. Later,
when the painful realities of your life return, you simply eat again.

For Jerry, food provided an escape from the drudgery of his
life. He told me, 'Lots of times, I eat just to put something in
my face. It helps me stop thinking about how much I hate my life.

I work in a dead-end job, my marriage is awful and my kids are
always in trouble. We constantly struggle with money, barely
covering our bills each month. Most days, food is the only
thing I have to look forward to. It's all I've got.'

Eating is quicker and easier than trying to invent new ways to
entertain yourself or to cope with life. In fact, Jerry
admitted, 'Without food, I'd have no fun at all!'

Macaroni and cheese

Last week, I showed you how to do a food tracing to identify the
emotions that are connected with certain foods. Here's what John
discovered about his craving for macaroni and cheese.

'When I was eight years old, my younger brother died, and soon
after that my mother started having severe migraine headaches.
For years, we tiptoed around the house because she couldn't
tolerate any type of noise. My father got depressed and usually
spent evenings watching TV with a six-pack of beer.

Once a week or so, a neighbor named Margie invited me and my
sister over for dinner. To stretch her food budget, she usually
made casseroles like as macaroni and cheese. When Margie's
husband told funny stories, we could laugh as loud as we wanted
without worrying about Mom's headaches. Now, when life gets too
serious and hard, I start longing for macaroni and cheese
because it helps me lighten up and feel like laughing again.'

Food provides transitions

Have you noticed how food provides a convenient way to move from
one event or time of day to another? Doughnuts start a meeting.
Dessert ends a meal. Ice cream signifies bedtime. Even your
afternoon snack indicates you are home from work and ready to
start your evening. But what if your 'food transition' is
contributing to your weight gain?

After a stressful work day, Kevin decided to stop at McDonald's
on the way home. The next day, he did it again. Before he knew
it, he'd slipped into the habit of going through the drive-up
lane every day after work. After a year of 'transition' snacks
of french fries and milkshakes, Kevin had gained more than 50
pounds.

To break a pattern of using food for transition, you may need to
shake up your routine. Drive home from work on a new street or
turn into your driveway from the opposite direction. If you
normally enter your house through the garage, switch to the
front door, then immediately walk upstairs or into your den
instead of toward the kitchen.

Invent new ways to mark transitions in your day. You can
symbolize being off work by drinking hot tea or a diet soda.
Change your bedtime routine to include relaxing music or
stretching exercises in place of a bowl of ice cream.

Procrastinating

Suppose you need to mow the lawn or clean the house. It's easy
to think, 'I'll eat something first, then I'll be ready to
start.' You might do the same thing with a big work project or a
school assignment. The larger or more difficult the job, the
more times you will eat to avoid it. Of course, after you finish
your food, your distasteful task will still be waiting for you.

Sometimes eating helps avoid THINKING.

Christine's husband was a strong, domineering person who
preferred to avoid discussions around serious issues. Christine
knew for months that her marriage was in trouble, but she just
couldn't face the discussion that would happen once she brought
up the subject of getting a divorce. So whenever she
contemplated talking to her husband, she would go to the
refrigerator and get something to eat so she wouldn't have to
think about it.

This week, take a look at the times you are most likely to do
'non-hungry eating.' Pay attention to what you might be
'needing' during those times. Then push yourself away from the
refrigerator and look for some healthier ways to meet your needs.

Next ezine: People needs-connecting, friendships

Note: No ezine next week due to Memorial Day Holiday. Also,
during the summer, I'll be sending this newsletter every other
week, so watch for the next one June 1st.

Know others who've got a minute? Forward this ezine and brighten
their day.

Want to comment on this ezine? Click 'Reply' and send me a note.
During 2009, this ezine is focusing on the challenges of
emotional eating and other psychological issues. The content is
based on excerpts from my book 'Life is Hard, Food is Easy: The
5-Step Plan to Overcome Emotional Eating.'

To read previous issues:
http://www.rapidwtloss.com/index.php?pag
e_id=289

© Linda Spangle, 2009. #0518, Weight Loss for Life, Inc.

5023 W. 120th Ave. #183, Broomfield, CO 80020
Contact: Linda@WeightLossJoy.com
www.weightlossjoy.com
303-452-1545 or 1-800-298-3020

Elayne from
Florida Eastern Time Zone

" My goal is to live the truly religious life, and express it in my music. If you live it, when you play, there's no problem because the music is part of the whole thing. To be a musician is really something. It goes very,very deep. My music is the spiritual expression of what I am--my faith, my knowledge, my being." by John Coltrane

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life!.-Annonymous

Music is a moral l


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May 11

Got a minute? That's long enough to pull up a food memory.

The Wt. Loss Minute By Linda Spangle, RN, MA
Author: 100 Days of Weight Loss
www.WeightLossJoy.com

Great idea: Use food memories to figure out what you need now.

I remember...

Have you ever heard an old song on the radio and suddenly
remembered a person or an event you hadn't thought about in
years? Maybe it reminded you of your first love or a great
concert or a party.

Just like that familiar old song, your favorite foods can
also be connected to situations from your past.

Foods often become embedded in your memory, not just because
of how they taste, but because of the FEELINGS you originally
had around them. Each time you associate a particular food
with an event or an experience, you create a link that
continues to exist, even years later.

Heather discovered an interesting explanation for her
struggles with craving popcorn and eating huge amounts of it.
Here's what she said:

'My parents were both alcoholics and when they'd been
drinking, I would hide in my room because their yelling and
fighting scared me. They pretty much got drunk every day but
for some reason, they never drank on Sundays. I don't know if
they wanted to start the week sober or what.

On Sunday evenings, I would sit on the couch between them and
eat popcorn while we all watched TV. It was homemade popcorn,
the old-fashioned kind with lots of salt and butter. Those
evenings were one of the few times in my childhood I didn't
feel afraid. Whenever I'm anxious or scared, I still reach
for popcorn because it reminds me of feeling safe and secure.'

Over the past couple of months, I've discussed the first two
steps for conquering emotional eating. (What's going on? What
do I feel?) Step Three in this process is asking yourself:

WHAT DO I NEED?

Suppose you are at a baseball game and you get an
overwhelming desire for a hot dog. Is it because you love the
taste of hot dogs? Or is it because you love the FEELINGS
stirred by memories of fun times when you attended ball games
as a child?

We tend to miss the happiness and comfort of good times in
our past. But since we can't go back there, food becomes as
close as we get. By eating a memory-associated food, we
attempt to recapture those wonderful old feelings.

Food connections

Your memories around specific foods will often provide clues
to how they meet your needs today. See if you can remember
times in your childhood when you ate some of your favorite
foods. Recall where you were and the people you were with at
those times. Here are some examples that might help you pull
up your own food memories.

* Ice cream cones: Saturday night. We made a special trip
into town and bought ice cream to celebrate the end of a week.
* Red licorice: The local candy store. Mom let me go by
myself and I got to choose what I wanted.
* Pink cotton candy: Annual trip to the circus. It was one of
the few times Dad and I went to an event by ourselves.
* Three-layer chocolate cake: My birthday. I got to pick out
the cake. It was a rare time when I felt noticed and valued.
* Christmas pudding: Holiday gatherings, times of feeling
cozy and happy.

By tracing back to your earliest recollections of eating a
food, you can identify the needs that were met at that time.
When you crave that food now, you might be experiencing the
same needs as in your food memory.

For me, cookies are one of my favorite foods. Here's the food
tracing that helped me figure out the needs that cause me to
want cookies.

'At my small country school in rural South Dakota, I
struggled a lot with feeling awkward and not fitting in with
the other kids. On cold, snowy days, I remember coming home
to freshly baked cookies cooling on the kitchen table. My
brother and I would drink glasses of milk and eat half a
dozen cookies. Mom liked to bake, so she was usually very
cheerful on those days. Sitting in that cozy kitchen made me
feel warm, nurtured, and most of all, very safe.

I've learned that when I start craving cookies, I'm usually
feeling anxious or uneasy about something such as my work or
other people's expectations. Eating cookies makes me feel
confident, secure and emotionally safe.'

By correlating your food craving with a previous emotional
response, you can instantly identify what you are missing or
needing at the present. But food doesn't have to be the
solution to your empty emotional places. You can learn how to
take care of your needs in other ways. Over the next few
weeks, I'll help you find answers on how to do this.

Next week: Identifying specific needs

Elayne from
Florida Eastern Time Zone

" My goal is to live the truly religious life, and express it in my music. If you live it, when you play, there's no problem because the music is part of the whole thing. To be a musician is really something. It goes very,very deep. My music is the spiritual expression of what I am--my faith, my knowledge, my being." by John Coltrane

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life!.-Annonymous

Music is a moral l


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Thanks -- I love each and every one!!! Have a super day!

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I get these once a week. I'll keep sharing them with you.

Elayne from
Florida Eastern Time Zone

" My goal is to live the truly religious life, and express it in my music. If you live it, when you play, there's no problem because the music is part of the whole thing. To be a musician is really something. It goes very,very deep. My music is the spiritual expression of what I am--my faith, my knowledge, my being." by John Coltrane

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life!.-Annonymous

Music is a moral l


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Thank you for sharing -- I love each and every one! Keep them coming, please!

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May 4

The Wt. Loss Minute By Linda Spangle, RN, MA
Author: 100 Days of Weight Loss
www.WeightLossJoy.com

Got A Minute? That's Long Enough To Feel Something!

Great idea: Revive your buried emotions

At a recent visit to my favorite coffee shop, I watched two
women greet each other with a warm embrace. 'I'm so sorry!'
said one of the women. The second one quickly wiped her eyes
and said, 'Thanks. But I don't want to get all emotional. It
feels too awful!'

I don't know what prompted her sadness, but as I watched the
two friends, I noticed they each ate a large cinnamon roll
along with their coffee. It appeared to work too, because I
didn't see any more tears.

Looking at your feelings isn't always enjoyable. Emotions
make you face the truth about life. Sometimes they force you
to consider decisions or changes you may not be ready for. If
your feelings make you too uncomfortable, you may try to
escape them entirely.

However, blocking your emotions also means you have to avoid
certain thoughts, so you continue to ignore your
disappointment with your marriage or your children. You
pretend you enjoy working at a meaningless job that never
challenges you. You push aside long-standing bitterness over
your childhood or your current life path.
If I start crying, I'm afraid I'll never stop!

Difficult emotions like anger and grief can make you feel
like you are walking to the edge of a black hole. Because you
can't see the bottom, you simply avoid ever looking at those feelings.

Besides, you're afraid that if you start crying, you might
not be able to stop. Or, you worry that taking the lid off
your bitterness might cause you to explode and say mean,
hurtful things, so you keep the door to your bottled-up
thoughts tightly closed.

Of course, to keep your feelings buried, you have to keep
eating. Day after day, rather than give your emotions a
chance to peek out, you use food to stuff them in. Shirley
tried to never think about her life. In reality, she felt
insecure at her job, uneasy about her marriage, and afraid of
the dark thoughts that made her feel so depressed. She said,
'Food keeps me running from myself. As long as I keep eating,
I don't have to face everything that's wrong in my life. So I
just don't allow myself to stop.'

Reviving lost feelings

A few weeks ago, I crawled underneath my desk to hook up some
computer cords. I was in a hurry, so I wasn't paying close
attention to my surroundings. As I got up from my kneeling
position, I slammed my head against the underside of my desk.
Wow, did it ever hurt! With my hand on my bruised head, I
began to cry from the pain. Suddenly, I started to wail
loudly, and actually broke into deep sobs.

As I sat on the floor and cried, I realized my head didn't
even hurt any more. But the pain had somehow opened my
emotions, and now I was able to cry over a ton of recent
hurts, disappointments and sadness. I hate crying, but I will
confess that it felt great to release those pent-up feelings
and let them out.

If you've lost touch with your emotions, you may need to pull
some of them back to a conscious level. Recovering your
feelings doesn't mean you have to start pounding your fists
and screaming (or hit your head on your desk). You simply
need to move out of the neutral zone and rebuild your
enthusiasm for life. One way to revive feelings is to rent
movies that you know will prompt an emotional response. Watch
a tragically sad movie, then go ahead and cry. Invite a group
of friends over to a comedy night then pull out movies that
make you laugh until your stomachs hurt.

If you've forgotten how anger feels, you might go to an
animal shelter that houses abused pets. Stand in front of
their cages and try to imagine the pain they've endured.
Allow the intensity of your feelings to build as you picture
the cruelty experienced by these animals. Don't just feel sad
for them...feel angry! Allow that emotion to surface in other
areas of your life instead of using food to keep it buried.

The Courage to Feel

Once you recognize an emotion, allow yourself to sit with it
and actually feel it. Use the exercise 'I feel, because of,'
to describe it. Then explore it further by adding more words.
For example, if you feel angry or sad, dissect these emotions
into tinier pieces and search for accurate words to explain them.

As you explore ways to stop the patterns of emotional eating,
you won't always like the solution. You may unearth pain you
buried long ago, hoping to never face it again. And, food
will always lure you with the promise of an easy way to escape.

Don't ever give up on your efforts. Facing your emotions will
give you an amazing edge with sticking with your
weight-management goals. When you don't require food to
appease your emotions, staying on your diet and exercise
program will become a whole lot easier.

Next week: Looking at what we NEED in life.
emoticon

Edited by: ANGELBELIEVER at: 5/4/2009 (19:59)
Elayne from
Florida Eastern Time Zone

" My goal is to live the truly religious life, and express it in my music. If you live it, when you play, there's no problem because the music is part of the whole thing. To be a musician is really something. It goes very,very deep. My music is the spiritual expression of what I am--my faith, my knowledge, my being." by John Coltrane

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life!.-Annonymous

Music is a moral l


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Hi Mary. Thanks for taking the time to let me know how much these are helping you with your emotional eating. I wanted to share them because they are helping me as well. Have a blessed week.

Elayne from
Florida Eastern Time Zone

" My goal is to live the truly religious life, and express it in my music. If you live it, when you play, there's no problem because the music is part of the whole thing. To be a musician is really something. It goes very,very deep. My music is the spiritual expression of what I am--my faith, my knowledge, my being." by John Coltrane

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life!.-Annonymous

Music is a moral l


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Hi, Elayne. I just wanted to let you know that I really enjoy these posts. If I do nothing else on spark, I always check this thread when there's a new post. I try to tell myself that I ALWAYS have a minute. These articles are really helping me with my emotional eating, and I just wanted to take the time to thank you for what a wonderful thing you do for me here on spark. Thank you SO MUCH for taking the time out of your day to be here for us. I'm sure I'm not alone in that sentiment. Hugs~M

~Mary

***Quit Smoking July 25, 2009***

"We can do anything we want to do if we stick to it long enough."~Helen Keller


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April 27

Got a minute? That's long enough to stop feeling guilty.

The Wt. Loss Minute By Linda Spangle, RN, MA
Author: 100 Days of Weight Loss
www.WeightLossJoy.com

Great idea: Guilt is a cover up for your true emotions!

'The day started out fine, Julie said. I was following my
diet plan like usual until someone brought chocolate triple
layer cake into the office. I simply couldn't resist!'

'First, I had a very small piece. Of course, the cake tasted
wonderful. So I went back and got a larger piece which I
promptly devoured. Now I feel so guilty for giving in to the
temptation. Sometimes, when I've messed up like that, I feel
guilty for days!'

Is guilt an emotion?

The past few weeks, I've been focusing on identifying your
emotions, which is one of the critical steps in conquering
emotional eating. Using the exercise 'I feel, because of,'
Julie would probably say, 'I feel guilty because of going off
my diet.'

But while this seems like an easy way to describe her
actions, guilty is a descriptive word, not a true emotion.
When someone has committed a wrong act, the word fits
perfectly. So we might say someone was guilty of a crime or
guilty of cheating on their taxes or their spouse.

But when you say you 'feel guilty' around a non-criminal
behavior, you are not describing a feeling. Instead, the word
'guilty' serves as a cover-up for a less acceptable emotion.
When you peek underneath your guilty feelings, you may
discover a whole list of emotions.

The next time you feel guilty about something, ask yourself
the following question:

'If I wasn't feeling guilty, what would I be feeling?'

Suppose like Julie, you eat a piece of cake that wasn't on
your diet plan. Instead of stopping at 'feeling guilty,'
consider what else is going on.

Maybe you feel DISAPPOINTED because you couldn't resist a
temptation or FRUSTRATED because you fell off your diet. You
might feel EMBARRASSED because your friends saw you eating
the cake. Perhaps you're AFRAID you'll never lose weight or
that your spouse will yell at you.

Saying you feel guilty about eating cake is often easier than
facing the truth. It also takes you off the hook and lets you
avoid taking responsibility for your actions. When you
identify your REAL feelings, you recognize the insecurity and
disappointment you would have missed if you hadn't looked
beyond feeling guilty.

Deeper feelings can be painful

Cassie's aging parents lived several hundred miles away from
her. She knew she should see them more often, but every time
she returned home after visiting them, she went into an
eating frenzy. She assumed her food struggles were related to
'feeling guilty' about not visiting them sooner or doing more
things for them.

Using the exercise, 'I feel, because,' Cassie made a list of
what she felt outside of 'guilty.' As she dug deeper, Cassie
was surprised at the intensity of her emotions. Suddenly, she
began to understand why she disliked going home as well as
why it was causing her to eat.

Here's her list of 'I feel, because'

Angry, because they expect me to visit a lot
Frustrated, because lack of money keeps me from flying home
often
Afraid, because they will think I've abandoned them
Devastated, because they are going downhill so fast
Worried, because they might need nursing home care soon
Irritated, because they don't act like they appreciate me
Bitter, because they've ignored me a lot of my life
Resentful, because my brother doesn't take his turn at
visiting

Cassie realized she had a lot of conflicting emotions about
her parents and their current situation. Instead of covering
her thoughts by feeling guilty, she was able to identify and
process what she really felt. Once she understood her
emotions and shifted her attitude, Cassie was able to stop
her eating binges.

Saying you feel guilty might seem like an easy way out. But
digging underneath those words helps you face emotions you
were trying to avoid. By uncovering your hidden feelings, you
can create solutions for taking care of them instead of
eating them away.

Next week: What if I don't know what I feel?

Know others who've got a minute? Forward this ezine and
brighten their day.

Want to comment on this ezine? Click 'Reply' and send me a
note.

To read previous issues:
http://www.rapidwtloss.com/index.php?pag
e_id=289

Note: During 2009, this ezine is focusing on the challenges
of emotional eating and other psychological issues. The
content is based on excerpts from my book 'Life is Hard, Food
is Easy: The 5-Step Plan to Overcome Emotional Eating.'



Edited by: ANGELBELIEVER at: 4/27/2009 (14:32)
Elayne from
Florida Eastern Time Zone

" My goal is to live the truly religious life, and express it in my music. If you live it, when you play, there's no problem because the music is part of the whole thing. To be a musician is really something. It goes very,very deep. My music is the spiritual expression of what I am--my faith, my knowledge, my being." by John Coltrane

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life!.-Annonymous

Music is a moral l


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April 20

Got a minute? That's long figure out what you're feeling.

The Wt. Loss Minute By Linda Spangle, RN, MA
Author: 100 Days of Weight Loss
www.WeightLossJoy.com

Great idea: Tell your steering wheel what you feel today

Last week, you learned about the 'emotional box' and how we
tend to avoid painful emotions by not allowing ourselves to
feel. When you don't pay much attention to your feelings,
it's easy to forget how to describe them.

Today, I want you to look closely at some of your current
emotions and begin to label exactly how you feel.

Maybe you can only think of a few words such as angry,
depressed, or happy. But within each of these categories lies
an enormous range of descriptive words that will capture your
feelings more accurately.

Lots of emotions carry a range of intensity, from mild
feelings such as 'upset' to major responses such as
'horrified.' Look at the difference between feeling
explosive, furious, or anguished to the less intense
responses of being irritated or frustrated.

For example, if you are feeling angry, decide whether you are
livid, bitter, or overwhelmed. Maybe your feelings are less
intense such as annoyed, irritated, or grouchy.

Suppose you are depressed over a relationship break-up. In
addition to feeling down, tearful, or sad, look for other
words that fit. Maybe you also feel lonely, discouraged,
disappointed, or abandoned.

What am I feeling?

Here's a simple way to start identifying your emotions. On a
blank page of paper, draw a line down the middle from the top
to the bottom. On the left side, write the words 'I feel'
and, on the other side, write 'because.'

In the left column, begin writing words that describe your
feelings about a situation, person, or event. For each
feeling word, under the heading 'because,' add a reason or an
explanation of why you feel this way.

Use whatever words come to mind to describe your emotions and
the reasons behind the them. You can repeat words such as
'angry' as often as you like, just add a different
explanation each time.

Keep your list simple, using one or two words to identify
each feeling and a short phrase to describe why you feel that
way. Feel free to identify just a couple of feelings or to
fill an entire page with your list. Once you finish, read
over your list and make sure you've been accurate and
completely addressed the situation.

This exercise can help you explore your feelings in a wide
range of life circumstances - from general thoughts about
your job or your home to specific situations such as a fight
with your spouse.

How I feel about my life

To practice this exercise, take a mental sweep of your
present situation and describe your thoughts about life in
general. Consider all of the areas that currently affect you,
including positive, happy ones as well as issues that are
difficult or challenging. Here's an example:

'I feel, because,'

* Happy, because my three children are wonderful
* Frustrated, because I can't seem to get caught up
* Stressed, because I'm having lots of pressure at work
* Worried, because my company is considering layoffs
* Thrilled, because I love my new house
* Contented, because I have a great husband

Feelings around a missed promotion

After months of working toward a promotions, Cheryl was
furious when she learned the position was given to Karen, an
employee who wasn't very talented but was friends with the
boss. Here's her list of emotions related to her anger and
disappointment'

'I feel, because'

* Outraged, because Karen got the promotion, not me
* Resentful, because she's so manipulative
* Humiliated, because friends were sure I'd get it
* Trapped, because my job feels dead-end now
* Furious, because I worked so hard for nothing
* Disgusted, because my boss plays favorites
* Worn out, because I'm fighting to get ahead
* Bitter, because life isn't fair Angry and resentful, because
my boss never shows appreciation

Completing her list helped Cheryl recognize that her feelings
were appropriate considering the situation. So she decided to
look for ways to deal with her anger and frustration.

Identifying your emotions gives you power by bringing your
feelings out into the open. And once you see the whole
picture, you aren't as likely to reach for food to cover up
what you feel.

You don't even have to write the words down to be able to
identify your feelings. You can just think them or even tell
them to your steering wheel as you drive. Describing what you
feel also helps decrease the intensity. Plus, it's a great
way to get over your anger about bad drivers.

Next week: Is guilt an emotion?

Know others who've got a minute? Forward this ezine and
brighten their day.

Want to comment on this ezine? Click 'Reply' and send me a note.

Previous issues:
http://www.rapidwtloss.com/index.php?pag
e_id=289

Note: During 2009, this ezine is focusing on the challenges
of emotional eating and other psychological issues. The
content is based on excerpts from my book 'Life is Hard, Food
is Easy: The 5-Step Plan to Overcome Emotional Eating.'

© Linda Spangle, 2009. #0420, Weight Loss for Life, Inc.
5023 W. 120th Ave. #183, Broomfield, CO 80020
Contact: Linda@WeightLossJoy.com
www.weightlossjoy.com

Elayne from
Florida Eastern Time Zone

" My goal is to live the truly religious life, and express it in my music. If you live it, when you play, there's no problem because the music is part of the whole thing. To be a musician is really something. It goes very,very deep. My music is the spiritual expression of what I am--my faith, my knowledge, my being." by John Coltrane

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life!.-Annonymous

Music is a moral l


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April 13


Got a minute? That's long enough to have a feeling.

The Wt. Loss Minute By Linda Spangle, RN, MA
Author: 100 Days of Weight Loss
www.WeightLossJoy.com

Great idea: Rediscover your emotions

Remember how easily your emotions came when you were a child?
You rolled around on the floor when you laughed and you never
worried about whether you looked silly. When you fell and
skinned your knee, you wailed loudly and cried hot tears. You
screamed in anger when your brother threw your favorite doll
in the mud.

Most of the time, you never questioned whether these emotions
made sense, you just expressed what you felt. Then you began
to grow up. Little by little, you decreased the levels of how
you showed your feelings.

You learned how to tone down your outbursts and stifle your
giggles. Instead of throwing a temper tantrum, you clenched
your teeth or said a few bad words under your breath. And
when you were told to stop crying, you did, or at least you
cried a lot more quietly.

From your parents, teachers, and even your friends, you
learned how to be 'proper' with showing your emotions.
But some of what you learned may not have been accurate or
even healthy. If you were taught to be selective with showing
emotions, you may have chosen which feelings to keep and
which ones to quietly push away.

Where did your emotions go?

Perhaps now, you rarely show anger and you certainly never
cry. Instead of reacting when you feel sad or disappointed,
you quietly push your thoughts aside and go on. In your mind,
you believe you are in control of your feelings.

But emotions don't exist in isolation, they are all
connected to each other. Picture a long cord with
uncomfortable emotions such as anger, sadness, loneliness and
boredom listed on the left end. The right end of the cord
holds positive feelings such as love, happiness, sexuality
and peacefulness.

Negative emotions ****** YOU ****** Positive emotions

When you pull in one side of the cord, the other side pulls
in too. So as you train yourself to never feel negative
emotions such as anger or sadness, you also decrease your
ability to feel positive ones such as true joy, peace or connection.

The emotional box

If you block your emotions long enough, you can become so
good at it that you stop feeling much of anything. You
gradually build an invisible wall, sort of an 'emotional
box' around yourself to keep your feelings inside at all times.

In this protected box, you continue to function as you always
have. You go to work, you raise your children, you visit your
mother. To the world, you look fine, but in truth, you've
buried your authentic self.

Inside the box, you live in a neutral zone where you are
emotionally dull. Without the ability to feel and express
emotions, you disconnect yourself from life. Eventually, your
zest for living slips away and intimate relationships become
a chore.

Eating instead of feeling

If you seem to be getting along fine without your emotions,
why bother uncovering your them? After all, you know your
emotions can be very painful, and you'd rather not
experience that discomfort.

When I was using food to deal with my grief issues, my
counselor told me, 'You're eating instead of crying.'
Of course, I didn't want to cry. I hated crying, and I was
trying to avoid it at all costs. But my depression as well as
my weight struggles were clear signs that I had to change how
I dealt with my feelings.

Maybe in the past, talking about your feelings made things
worse. Since it won't change anything, you may believe that
it's futile to drag out your emotions and feel the pain again.

Unfortunately, living in the emotional box isn't great
either. To keep your feelings from creeping in, you have to
constantly insulate the walls, usually by stuffing yourself
with food.

At the same time, you may be afraid to ever crawl out of the
box. Once you allow yourself to start feeling again, you'll
probably have to deal with some emotional pain, which
doesn't appeal to you either.

Finding your emotions back

Facing your emotions doesn't have to destroy you. When you
take your feelings out of the dark, it makes them less scary.
You may discover that your grief, anger, and even bitterness
aren't as intense as you remembered. In all likelihood,
most of your emotions aren't really gone, they've just
become dormant. Reviving them might be as simple as adjusting
the way you think about life. Once you bring your emotions
out into the open, you may even feel relieved.

You also will get a fresh view of how they connect to your
eating. Knowing exactly which ones are driving you toward
food can boost your confidence around coping with your
feelings. emoticon

Elayne from
Florida Eastern Time Zone

" My goal is to live the truly religious life, and express it in my music. If you live it, when you play, there's no problem because the music is part of the whole thing. To be a musician is really something. It goes very,very deep. My music is the spiritual expression of what I am--my faith, my knowledge, my being." by John Coltrane

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life!.-Annonymous

Music is a moral l


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Got a minute? That's long enough to take a walk.

The Wt. Loss Minute By Linda Spangle, RN, MA
Author: 100 Days of Weight Loss
www.WeightLossJoy.com

Great idea: Do ANYTHING but eat! Over the past several
weeks, I've told you about head hunger (craving for chewy,
crunchy foods) and heart hunger (wanting sweets, or soft,
creamy foods.)

Eventually, you'll learn many other ways to manage your
emotions and needs. But for now, I encourage you to simply do
SOMETHING that will stop you from grabbing food. Once you've
identified which type of emotional need you're having, use
these quick solutions to provide 'buffers' between you and
what's causing you to eat.

Make an INSTEAD list

Start by creating a list of things you can do INSTEAD of
eating. I suggest you make separate lists for 'head' hunger
vs. 'heart' hunger. You may notice some overlap with your
lists, but think carefully about what will help you cope with
your emotional need of the moment.

With head hunger emotions such as stress and anger, consider
activities that help you relax and let go. You might include
things such as exercise, taking deep breaths, or pounding
your pillow.

When your struggling with heart hunger emotions such as
sadness or loneliness, you might find comfort in music or
reading. If the issue is boredom, learning new hobbies or
taking a class might help you cope.

Keep your lists available so you can draw on them anytime,
especially when you get caught off guard by something
unexpected. These 'insteads' won't solve the problem of
emotional eating but they will allow you time to reflect.
Rather than automatically reaching for food, spend some time
thinking about the cause of your hunger and the deeper
aspects of your emotional needs.

Sample Head-Hunger INSTEADS

* Walk until you feel better, whether that takes ten minutes
or an hour.
* Take several deep breaths. Sigh loudly with each one.
* Clean something you never get around to, such as a closet
or the 'junk' drawer.
* Go to a movie and ignore the concession stand. Focus on the
acting and the scenery, then pretend you are a movie critic
and write your own review.
* Read something that absorbs you. Plan ahead so you have a
couple of good 'diversion' books available.
* Wait ten minutes before eating anything. During that time,
intentionally do something positive - clean off the top of
your desk, brush your cat, rinse out the coffee pot - or do
something nice for somebody else.

Sample Heart-hunger INSTEADS

* Listen to a favorite tape or CD. Focus on doing nothing
except listening.
* Hug or hold somebody. If you don't have someone you can
hug, consider volunteering at a nursing home or other setting
where your hugs would be welcomed.
* Hold or stroke a live animal. If you can't find one, hug a
stuffed animal instead.
* Do something nice for yourself. Get a massage, a facial, or
a manicure.
* Do gardening or other outdoor activities. Spend time
appreciating nature.
* Give yourself a flower reward. Pick out a specific flower
that symbolizes what you need.
* Or buy a lot of inexpensive flowers and surround yourself
with them.

First response list

After you finish planning things to do instead of eating,
select a few that are your favorites. Put these on a separate
list to use as your 'first response' to emotional hunger.
When you start noticing a food craving, immediately do at
least one of your 'first response' items.

Here's an example of a 'first response' plan for head hunger.

1. When I want to chew on something.
2. Walk, walk, walk. Do something active.
3. Take at least three deep breaths. With each breath, say 'I
am strong!'
4. Put a stick of gum in my mouth to stop the taste thoughts.


Whatever activity you choose, do it immediately, before you
change your mind. Don't allow the phrase 'a little bit won't
hurt me' to weaken your resolve. In many cases, the food does
hurt you by contributing to more emotional struggles or by
harming your self-esteem.


Elayne from
Florida Eastern Time Zone

" My goal is to live the truly religious life, and express it in my music. If you live it, when you play, there's no problem because the music is part of the whole thing. To be a musician is really something. It goes very,very deep. My music is the spiritual expression of what I am--my faith, my knowledge, my being." by John Coltrane

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life!.-Annonymous

Music is a moral l


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MARYLYNNE77's Photo MARYLYNNE77 Posts: 2,516
3/24/09 11:12 A

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Thanks again! I checked out this woman's website after your last post, and I really liked what I read. I need to learn to recognize the emotions I'm feeling, and then maybe I can take steps to avoid the emotional eating. I lost the battle last night, but overall I'm doing much better. Thanks again for these posts. They keep reminding me to confront my feelings. Hugs~Mary

~Mary

***Quit Smoking July 25, 2009***

"We can do anything we want to do if we stick to it long enough."~Helen Keller


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March 23


Got a minute? That's long enough to comfort yourself.

The Wt. Loss Minute By Linda Spangle, RN, MA
Author: 100 Days of Weight Loss
www.WeightLossJoy.com

Great idea: Identify your empty spots in life

'I want something to eat, but I don't know what I want!'

As you say these words, you poke your head into the
refrigerator to see what looks good. You don't really crave
any particular food, you just know you want 'something.'

The last couple of weeks, I've talked about 'head hunger,'
and food cravings related to stress, anger or other
pressure-type emotions. Head hunger cravings make you want
chewy or crunchy foods such as potato chips, nuts and candy
bars.

With the second type of emotional eating, heart hunger, you
often don't have any specific food in mind. You just start
thinking about eating. But it doesn't usually take long to
figure out what you want.

Sweets! Ice cream! Pastries. A big plate of pasta!

With heart hunger, you look for soft, smooth or creamy foods,
including all kinds of sweets and desserts. You might also
find yourself wishing for 'comfort foods' or favorites from
your childhood, ones that made you feel nurtured, satisfied
and safe.

Here's a list of common heart-hunger foods

Soft or creamy foods:
Ice cream
Pasta
Chocolate
Cinnamon rolls, pastries
Cheese
Eggs
Milkshakes

Comfort foods:
Meatloaf
Mashed potatoes
Biscuits and gravy
Pudding, pies
Cakes, cheesecake
Mexican or other ethnic foods
Alcoholic drinks

Memory-related foods
Casseroles
Homemade desserts
Fudge, candy
Homemade bread
Childhood favorites
Popcorn
Mom's cooking

The magic of ice cream and brownies

Heart hunger stems from 'empty' emotions, such as feeling
sad, depressed, discouraged or lonely. It also shows up when
you're bored or restless, as well as when you feel hurt,
disappointed or let down.

When you are missing something in life or not getting things
you want, such as love, attention or appreciation, heart
hunger foods replace the gap left by these areas. Or, when
life feels awful, self-pity may send you hunting for comfort
food to bury your misery.

Do you often eat a bowl of ice cream at night before bedtime?
For many people, ice cream relates to childhood memories or
nostalgia for family connections. Other heart hunger foods
such as cinnamon rolls or brownies can fill the empty spots
left by broken relationships or disappointments in life.

Avoid or escape

Heart hunger feelings tend to be subtle, vague, and hidden,
sometimes making it hard to identify what's causing your
desire to eat. When you want to escape emotional pain, heart
hunger tempts you to use food as a drug. As long as you keep
eating, you can avoid thinking about your sadness or
loneliness.

Even though fatigue and illness aren't emotions, they can
tempt you to look for food because you think eating will make
you feel better. Sometimes it does, especially if your body
needs some nutrition. But lots of times, you don't stop
there. You keep eating more, hoping the food will save you
from going to bed early or having to take care of yourself in
some other way.

Recognizing heart hunger

Anytime you want to eat but don't know what you want, think
'heart hunger.' Do the same thing when you crave sweets or
ice cream. Ask yourself, 'What's making me feel empty right
now? What am I missing or needing in my life?'

Perhaps you're feeling alone and wish you had more friends or
a new life partner. Maybe difficult situations have left you
tired, discouraged or depressed. Or maybe you don't have much
challenge or meaning in your life, leaving you feeling bored
or restless.

Before you reach for the first bite of comfort food, think
about what feels empty or missing at the moment. Then ask
yourself, 'Will eating fix this?'

Of course, sometimes eating does make things better, at least
for a while. But in the end, nothing changes. Real life is
still there, filled with the same empty needs and desires as
before.

Recognizing your emotions is half the battle. So this week,
watch for food thoughts that indicate heart-hunger emotions.
Then look for ways to take care of your true needs instead of
using food as your solution. emoticon www.WeightLossJoy.com

Edited by: ANGELBELIEVER at: 3/24/2009 (13:06)
Elayne from
Florida Eastern Time Zone

" My goal is to live the truly religious life, and express it in my music. If you live it, when you play, there's no problem because the music is part of the whole thing. To be a musician is really something. It goes very,very deep. My music is the spiritual expression of what I am--my faith, my knowledge, my being." by John Coltrane

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life!.-Annonymous

Music is a moral l


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3/16/09 10:41 P

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Thanks, Elayne. These posts are really helping me. Hugs~Mary

~Mary

***Quit Smoking July 25, 2009***

"We can do anything we want to do if we stick to it long enough."~Helen Keller


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March 16

Got a minute? That's long enough to do ANYTHING except eat.

The Wt. Loss Minute By Linda Spangle, RN, MA
Author: 100 Days of Weight Loss
www.WeightLossJoy.com

Great idea: Don't chew on life!

Last week I talked about head hunger and how wanting chewy or
crunchy foods can indicate you want to 'chew' on something
(or someone) in your life. Often you don't even realize
what's bothering you until afterward.

Gail told me, 'On our family trip to Disneyland, I was
determined to stay away from snack foods. But two hours into
the first day, I'd already eaten a bunch of tortilla chips
and a bag of caramel corn.

That evening, when I thought about head hunger and my CRUNCHY
foods, I realized I wanted to chew on the costs for admission
and the long lines for all of the rides. Together these
things added a lot of extra stress to the vacation.'

Stress, anger, deadlines, even irritating people can all send
you looking for chewy or crunchy foods. In fact, any kind of
pressure-inducing emotion can cause head hunger.

But sometimes, head-hunger emotions are more sneaky.
Frustration, resentment, feeling overwhelmed or burned out,
even the desire for fun or excitement can also cause head
hunger cravings.

If you aren't aware of any obvious pressure emotions such as
anger or stress, you may want to see if more subtle, hidden
feelings are causing you to eat.

It's not fair!

Carol thought she was doing fine. She had a good job, a nice
apartment, and plenty of friends. Some day, she hoped to meet
a great man and get married again, but for now, she had
adjusted to being single. It took Carol a long time to
recognize that her food struggles were related to bitterness
over the loss of her marriage.

'Most days when I arrive home from work, I head straight for
the cupboard where I keep a supply of peanut M&M's. I always
think I'll just have a few of them before dinner, but I often
end up eating an entire bag.

Three years ago, my husband became involved with a female
coworker and eventually left me for the other woman. I
thought I'd worked through my feelings, but I guess I'm still
very bitter about what happened.

When I come home to my silent apartment, I fight to avoid the
memories of happier days when my marriage was strong. I grab
the crunchy candies and chew on being single. a lifestyle I
never wanted!'

I'll show you!

Bitterness or resentment can make you want to 'get even' with
people or prove that they can't tell you what to do. Finally
you declare, 'I'll show you...' (perhaps under your breath) and
then you go eat an entire pizza or a whole bag of cookies.

How silly! Of course, your eating had no effect on those you
wanted to punish. Most of the time, they don't even know
about it. Instead, your desire to get even made YOU gain weight.

I don't want to think about it!

If you have trouble being honest about feelings such as
anger, food helps you avoid thinking about your emotions.
Mary Ann's husband was always very critical and demanding.

'Whenever I'm talking to him, I try to predict his reaction
and plan what to say so he won't get upset. Often it doesn't
work and he blows up at me or belittles my opinions.

I wish I could be more open, but I can't take his verbal
abuse if he doesn't like what I say. So I cautiously tiptoe
around the house, often not talking much at all. I also sneak
into the kitchen a lot, where food helps me think about other
things. It also helps me shove away my resentment.'

Self-disgust

When you've failed many times at losing weight, you may feel
angry and disgusted with your own behavior. Jenny has been
dieting for years, but never seems to make much progress with
her goals.

'I hate everything--my mirror, my weight and, actually, my
life. I've done so many diet programs. Yet, look at me. I'm a
blob and I can't seem to change. I even hate the fact that
I've screwed up so many times on my weight-loss plans.'

Out of frustration at herself, Jenny keeps eating more and
gaining more weight. Self-directed anger sets up head hunger
that leads to more eating, keeping you stuck in the same
pattern you want so desperately to fix.

This week, focus on recognizing your most common head-hunger
situations and emotions. Then start looking for simple
actions you can do instead of eating. Your list might include
things such as taking a short walk or listening to music.
Also, remember that eating won't change your problems. It
simply postpones what you really need to do to cope with life.

Next week: Comfort foods and heart hunger

Know others who've got a minute? Forward this e-zine and
brighten their day.


Previous issues:
http://www.rapidwtloss.com/index.php?pag
e_id=289

Edited by: ANGELBELIEVER at: 3/16/2009 (21:36)
Elayne from
Florida Eastern Time Zone

" My goal is to live the truly religious life, and express it in my music. If you live it, when you play, there's no problem because the music is part of the whole thing. To be a musician is really something. It goes very,very deep. My music is the spiritual expression of what I am--my faith, my knowledge, my being." by John Coltrane

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life!.-Annonymous

Music is a moral l


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3/3/09 4:17 A

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Wow, Angelbeliever...that was good!
emoticon

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3/2/09 10:04 P

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Keep 'em coming, Angelbeliever! What a great share!!

Teams:
STRESSED OUT WOMEN GETTIN' HEALTHY
teams.sparkpeople.com/StressedOut
WomenGettin'Healthy

Make Life Happen
teams.sparkpeople.com/LL
Do It for Love
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Fabulous 40s, 50s & Up
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Here's another Got A Minute article I think we all can relate to.

March 2

Great idea: Food choices tell what you're feeling

It's the middle of the afternoon and you still haven't
finished the report that's due at five o'clock. Suddenly you
feel like eating something--one of those nut-filled candy bars
from the vending machine sounds great. You trudge down the
hall, get the candy bar, and eat half of it before you return
to your desk.

Later that evening you flip through the channels on TV, but
nothing looks interesting. You're exhausted from work and you
wish you weren't living alone. You wander around the house
thinking about eating something, but you can't decide what
you want.

You peek into the refrigerator to see if anything looks good.
Finally you pull out the half-empty carton of caramel fudge
ice cream and take a few bites. It tastes nice--kind of
soothing. So you take the it with you as you stroll back to
the couch.

Food is a mirror

These eating situations involve two different types of
emotional needs. The first is related to the pressures of
stress and time, while the second is prompted by fatigue and
boredom. In both cases, the food you selected gives clues to
the emotional needs behind your eating.

In my weight-management work, I've discovered that food
choices often act as a mirror, showing exactly which emotions
are prompting our desire to eat. NOT KNOWING what we want
also points toward specific emotional needs.

Five steps for conquering emotional eating

Over the months ahead, I'll be taking you through a series of
five unique steps that will help you overcome almost any food
craving or non-hungry desire to eat.

The steps consist of five simple questions:

1. What's going on?
2. What do I feel?
3. What do I need?
4. What's in my way?
5. What will I do?

You can use each step individually as an immediate strategy
for managing food temptation. But you will also benefit from
going through all five steps in sequence.

Each step will add depth to your understanding of the
emotions or needs behind your current food struggle. With
practice, you'll be able to flash through all five steps in
less than a minute, giving you an instant and powerful tool
for managing your emotional needs without reaching for food.

Step 1: What's Going On?

In this first step of conquering emotional eating, you will
learn how to assess what's causing you to look for food.
Whenever you recognize a non-hungry desire to eat, STOP and
ask yourself 'What's going on? What's affecting me or
bothering me right now?'

Knowing what's prompting your eating desire gives you a much
greater chance of doing something that will address your real
need and keep you out of the cupboard. Or, if you've already
eaten something, you can look backward and figure out what
contributed to your eating and how you could prevent that
situation in the future.

How I figured it out

Some years ago, I worked in a challenging job as a hospital
health educator. During that time, nearly every afternoon I
would get an intense craving for a cookie. So on my break,
I'd walk to a nearby bakery and buy a couple of chewy oatmeal
raisin cookies.

It bothered me that I couldn't break this habit. But no
matter how hard I tried to resist, those cookies would occupy
my thoughts until I got out to the bakery for my 'fix.'

One afternoon when work had been particularly stressful, I
noticed I was practically gnashing my teeth as I bit into the
chewy cookie. Suddenly it hit me that what I really wanted to
chew on was my obnoxious boss and the hospital's
administrative staff.

After that, I began paying attention to how I felt when I ate
certain foods and I discovered some interesting connections.
I noticed that when I felt stressed or frustrated, I looked
for 'chewy' foods such as cookies or candy bars.

But when I was struggling with sadness or grief, I preferred
soft ones like ice cream or my own homemade macaroni
casseroles. When I explored this theory with my clients, I
discovered these food categories consistently matched their
experiences as well.

For example, when fighting stress, anger or frustration,
people typically reached for foods that were chewy or
crunchy. They really wanted to 'chew' on something in life,
such as their employers, their children, or even projects or
deadlines. Because this pressure-related eating seemed to be
generated by specific thoughts or attitudes, I labeled it
HEAD HUNGER.

Other times, my clients would describe eating to cope with
hollow or restless feelings like boredom, depression or
loneliness. When experiencing these 'empty' emotions, they
typically chose soft, creamy-textured foods or 'comfort
foods' such as ice cream, pasta, or chocolate. Because this
type of eating seemed connected to the 'lack' of things, such
as love or attention, I labeled it HEART HUNGER.

Which one is it?

With practice, you can learn how to easily distinguish
between these two types of emotional eating. Once you
identify what's driving your desire to eat, you can take care
of what you really need, instead of burying your emotions
with a plate of brownies or a bag of potato chips.

These food-emotion connections may not always work for you.
Sometimes you won't be able to identify any emotional issues
that appear related to your eating. But keep searching.
Eventually, the connection between food and your emotions
will become more obvious.

Next week: Exploring Head Hunger

Know others who've got a minute? Forward this ezine and
brighten their day.

Want to comment on this ezine? Click 'Reply' and send me a note.

Previous issues:
http://www.rapidwtloss.com/index.php?pag
e_id=289

Note: During 2009, this ezine is focusing on the challenges
of emotional eating and other psychological issues. The
content is based on excerpts from my book 'Life is Hard, Food
is Easy: The 5-Step Plan to Overcome Emotional Eating.'

Even if you've read this book in the past, these excerpts
will help you review the critical steps involved with
conquering your emotional eating patterns.
emoticon
Linda@WeightLossJoy.com

Edited by: ANGELBELIEVER at: 3/2/2009 (21:46)
Elayne from
Florida Eastern Time Zone

" My goal is to live the truly religious life, and express it in my music. If you live it, when you play, there's no problem because the music is part of the whole thing. To be a musician is really something. It goes very,very deep. My music is the spiritual expression of what I am--my faith, my knowledge, my being." by John Coltrane

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life!.-Annonymous

Music is a moral l


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MARYLYNNE77's Photo MARYLYNNE77 Posts: 2,516
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Thanks, Elayne.

~Mary

***Quit Smoking July 25, 2009***

"We can do anything we want to do if we stick to it long enough."~Helen Keller


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Hi Mary, Wish there was a magic wand we could wave to stop our emotional eating...But there's isn't. Glad you have a therapist you can talk things over with. Glad you're not trying to tackle this on your own.Knowing what you have to do and doing it are two different things when you're depressed. Keep writing here..There's always someone that will answer you. You are not alone. emoticon

Elayne from
Florida Eastern Time Zone

" My goal is to live the truly religious life, and express it in my music. If you live it, when you play, there's no problem because the music is part of the whole thing. To be a musician is really something. It goes very,very deep. My music is the spiritual expression of what I am--my faith, my knowledge, my being." by John Coltrane

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life!.-Annonymous

Music is a moral l


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MARYLYNNE77's Photo MARYLYNNE77 Posts: 2,516
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Thanks for the tips. I think that's what I meant by "logically, I know what I need to do." I have read about many strategies to keep from emotional eating...I know a lot of them by heart. It just doesn't seem to help lately. It feels like it's gone far beyond just emotional eating, though I know at its root that's what it is. Last night nothing I could say to myself would stop me. To make matters worse, as soon as I logged off the computer...my dad brought home homemade cheesecake from work. I indulged, and I didn't stop there...I can't even remember today what else I ate. I hate this feeling of disgust inside me. I think I'm going to talk to my therapist this weekend about what's been going on with me. The intensity of it right now is scaring me...and disgusting me. I am going to try and check in more often. I tried keeping a journal, but it only lasted for two days. I give up too easily, and without accountablility or a response from someone else, I just keep saying the same negative things to myself inside my head. I do know that I can change...it's been much worse than this before, but it's been a long time. I don't want to ever go back to that place. As bad as things seem right now, I'm aware of how much worse it can get. I still have hope that I can get a handle on this, but I feel like I need to do something different this time...just not sure exactly what that is yet. Thanks so much for listening and being there on the other end. It means more than you know. Thanks~Mary

~Mary

***Quit Smoking July 25, 2009***

"We can do anything we want to do if we stick to it long enough."~Helen Keller


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Try drinking water only...or staying out of the kitchen for the rest of the night. Do something else with your hands...read a book...Glad you wrote about your struggle here. Keep writing..Don't look for food. Let us know how you do.

Elayne from
Florida Eastern Time Zone

" My goal is to live the truly religious life, and express it in my music. If you live it, when you play, there's no problem because the music is part of the whole thing. To be a musician is really something. It goes very,very deep. My music is the spiritual expression of what I am--my faith, my knowledge, my being." by John Coltrane

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life!.-Annonymous

Music is a moral l


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MARYLYNNE77's Photo MARYLYNNE77 Posts: 2,516
2/23/09 8:50 P

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Thanks for sharing this...I needed to read it. I'm really struggling right now with my emotional eating. I completely gave into it over the holidays, and I'm having a hard time coming back from the abyss. It is a vicious cycle...and one that seems to consume me every winter. I've noticed lately that flickers of hope are returning...encouraging me to believe that I can one day change. What I fear most is that this struggle will never go away for me. I won't ever defeat it. I may one day learn to manage it, but it will always be a part of me. I hope that I am wrong. I have been making some small positive changes here and there, but they've not been consistent. I'm pretty discouraged right now because I am 15 pounds heavier than what I weighed when I joined SparkPeople over a year ago. Logically, I know exactly what I need to be doing, yet somehow I keep making false starts. I'm not sure what it's going to take for me to tame this ugly beast inside of me, but I am encouraged when I hear stories of people who have tamed theirs. Yet...still I know as soon as I stop typing this, I'm going to go scour the kitchen for some comfort food. The feeling is almost as overpowering as a nicotine fit, and I'm really angry that regardless of what I say to myself right now, it is not taking away at all from the urge. It's beyond frustrating. It disgusts me, and yet I feel powerless to do anything different.

~Mary

***Quit Smoking July 25, 2009***

"We can do anything we want to do if we stick to it long enough."~Helen Keller


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MOMMA48's Photo MOMMA48 Posts: 544,683
2/23/09 8:00 P

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And, I'm sure all your hard work is going to pay off, PRINCESSALEXA!

As to the previous poems and articles -- how wonderful and inspirational! Thanks for sharing!!

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ANGELBELIEVER's Photo ANGELBELIEVER SparkPoints: (56,225)
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2/23/09 2:04 P

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Here's her poem in it's entirety.

Food is wonderful!
in fact, food is my best friend

but lately I'm aware that
my friend is hurting me
making me uncomfortable
sabotaging my goals
causing me grief and guilt
possibly destroying my life

Today I made a decision
it's time to get a new friend

I'm not afraid of food
food exists
my emotions exist
but I've unhooked the chain

I choose to feel
and I choose to eat
now I'm no longer a slave
to emotional eating.

Linda Spngle
emoticon

Edited by: ANGELBELIEVER at: 2/23/2009 (14:05)
Elayne from
Florida Eastern Time Zone

" My goal is to live the truly religious life, and express it in my music. If you live it, when you play, there's no problem because the music is part of the whole thing. To be a musician is really something. It goes very,very deep. My music is the spiritual expression of what I am--my faith, my knowledge, my being." by John Coltrane

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life!.-Annonymous

Music is a moral l


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FLORIDA-BISHOP's Photo FLORIDA-BISHOP Posts: 227
2/23/09 2:03 P

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That's great. I'm going to save it for future reference.
Vicki

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ANGELBELIEVER's Photo ANGELBELIEVER SparkPoints: (56,225)
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2/23/09 2:00 P

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The Wt. Loss Minute
By Linda Spangle, RN, MA
Feb. 9, 2009

Food is My Friend!

It starts innocently enough. You open a box of Girl Scout
cookies, planning to eat just a couple. An hour later, you
realize you've finished off half the box. Or perhaps at a
party, you reach into a bowl of peanuts or M&M's and quickly
lose track of how many times you grab another handful.

Maybe you don't consider these eating patterns to be related
to your emotions. But think about how often you put food into
your mouth when you aren't hungry or needing a meal.

What is emotional eating?

Emotional eating isn't a diagnosis. It's the simple act of
reaching for food when you aren't physically hungry or
needing nutrition.

Sneaking candy from the jar on your coworker's desk,
appreciating the homemade cookies in the break room, or
eating ice cream every night at bedtime all fit this
description. The food somehow meets a need or fills a gap in
your life.

Emotional eating can be obvious, such as the times you hunt
for a snack when you feel stressed or bored. But sometimes
the connection is more hidden and harder to recognize.

Peggy says, 'When the kids go down for their naps, I start
searching the cupboards. I'm not hungry, I just want something...'

John confessed, 'I can't break my habit of stopping for a Big
Mac and fries on the way home from work. Since I don't want
my family to know, I always eat a full dinner with them as well.'

There went the diet!

As I said last week, if you occasionally grab a candy bar on
a stressful day, you probably won't do much damage. But if
you aren't careful, you can slide into using food to 'fix'
all of your emotional needs. Eventually, emotional eating
will destroy your diet plan as well as ruin your motivation
and your self-esteem.

There's no question that food does make us feel better, at
least temporarily. But real life is still there when we stop
eating. At some point, the pleasure ends and negative
feelings creep in. Guilt and remorse don't stop us; they just
lead to more eating.

Sandy has tried many diet plans over the years. But her
success never lasts because she always slips back into a
predictable cycle of eating, feeling bad, then eating again.
Here's how she describes her pattern:

'First I eat to calm down and relax at the end of a hard day.
As the evening drags on, I eat because I'm alone and bored.
Later, I eat because I'm frustrated and disgusted with
myself. Once again, I've completely blown my diet and I feel
awful. So then I eat to punish myself for being bad and for
screwing up my goals.'

Hunger or desire to eat?

To stop emotional eating, you first have to recognize that
you're doing it. Start noticing all the times you eat when
you aren't actually hungry. Analyze your habits such hitting
the vending machine mid-afternoon, eating a bowl of ice cream
at bedtime or grabbing a few cookies every time you get off
the phone with your mother.

Next time you start thinking about food, decide whether
you're experiencing a physical need or an emotional one.
Before you put anything in your mouth, ask yourself,

'Is this hunger or a desire to eat?'

If you decide you're truly hungry, give your body some fuel.
But if you're having a desire to eat, catch yourself on the
spot and ask, "What's going on here? What's making me want to
eat right now?" Then consider how you could take care of your
real needs instead of appeasing them with food.

The key to managing emotional eating is not staying away from
food. (Although doing that may help stop the problem for the
moment.) What's more important is that you learn to identify
what you feel, need or want, then invent new ways of managing
these emotional issues instead of eating your way through them.

Here is a poem I wrote during one of my own eating struggles:

Food is wonderful!
in fact, food is my best friend

but lately I'm aware that
my friend is hurting me
making me uncomfortable
sabotaging my goals
causing me grief and guilt
possibly destroying my life

today I made a decision
it's time to get a new friend -- Linda Spangle

Elayne from
Florida Eastern Time Zone

" My goal is to live the truly religious life, and express it in my music. If you live it, when you play, there's no problem because the music is part of the whole thing. To be a musician is really something. It goes very,very deep. My music is the spiritual expression of what I am--my faith, my knowledge, my being." by John Coltrane

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life!.-Annonymous

Music is a moral l


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ANGELBELIEVER's Photo ANGELBELIEVER SparkPoints: (56,225)
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2/23/09 1:58 P

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I found this website and there is some great information in it. When ever I get it in my mail I will post it to this thread. Hope you get as much out of it as I have already.--Elayne


Got a minute? That's long enough to recognize emotional eating.

The Wt. Loss Minute By Linda Spangle, RN, MA
Author: 100 Days of Weight Loss
www.WeightLossJoy.com

Great idea: Learning to change was worth the pain

Today, I'm sharing my personal story about emotional eating.
It's not easy for me to do this because it reminds me of
sadness in my life that never goes away completely. But as a
way to help you understand emotional eating, I'm opening my
heart to show you my own struggles toward a healthier
relationship with food.

My journey began after nine years of silence, a time in which
I never spoke of my personal pain, and instead used food to
push my feelings far away.

Despite years of intense efforts, my husband and I do not
have children. I was born with an abnormally shaped uterus
that cannot support a full-term pregnancy. Doctors tried
everything possible to help me bear children. I went through
several major surgeries, spent months in bed, and endured
painful hormone shots.

Three different times, I carried a pregnancy for six months
before going into premature labor. Two of my baby girls were
stillborn. The third one lived for eleven hours before her
tiny lungs quit working. Complications with the final
pregnancy prevented me from ever being able to try again.

When I learned I would never be able to have children, I was
devastated. My sadness lingered for years and, in fact, it
has never faded completely. For a time, my husband and I
considered adopting, but finances and a variety of other
factors kept this from happening. So we made the decision to
accept we wouldn't have children and to move on with our lives.

I hate crying!

To cope with my grief, I stayed very busy, immersing myself
in my work as a nurse and health educator. For the next nine
years, I rarely spoke about my loss or told people what I'd
been through. Discussing the loss of the babies made me cry,
so I just didn't allow myself to talk about it.

Whenever I felt sad about my babies, I would eat a lot and
try to avoid thinking. Because soft foods felt especially
comforting, I ate lots of doughnuts and noodle casseroles. My
weight-loss efforts never lasted because I spent so much time
eating away the painful memories of losing my babies.

Mother's Day eating

Mother's Day has always been a difficult holiday for me. On
this day, when my friends are enjoying homemade cards and
breakfast in bed, my disappointment and grief return with a
vengeance. For many years, I would eat all day long on
Mother's Day, trying to pretend the holiday didn't exist.

One year after I'd battled an extensive winter depression, a
counselor suggested I stop avoiding the emotions of Mother's
Day and allow myself to feel them instead. I was terrified by
the thought, but I decided to follow her advice. With my
counselor's help, I planned that I would let my grief
surface, then acknowledge it instead of eating to push it away.

That Mother's Day morning, I woke up determined I would not
use food to stop my feelings. I drank coffee and ate a small
breakfast. Then I waited. Late in the morning, I felt the
sadness rising--the deep painful emotions I'd always tried to
avoid. But this time, I let them come. When the tears
started, I sat at my kitchen table, buried my head in my arms
and sobbed for an hour.

I cried for everything I missed by not having my babies. I
wept for not taking them to their first day of kindergarten
or picking out prom dresses or watching them cross the stage
at graduations. I grieved for never getting to plan their
weddings and I mourned that I would never have grandchildren.


I shed tears for all the love and the memories that never got
a chance to exist. I hurt for the sadness I saw in my
husband. And I cried for myself, and for the ache that had
never left the deepest corner of my heart.

Finally, I was quiet. Shakily I got up from the table, washed
my face, and went outside into the sunshine. As I stood in
the warmth, I felt an amazing sense of calm. And I realized I
had no desire to eat. Expressing those sad emotions had let
me feel the pain and survive it without needing to rely on
casseroles or brownies.

That day, I turned a corner in my life. From then on, I
started encouraging my emotions instead of stopping them.
Little by little, I learned to allow other painful feelings to surface
and to express them in ways that moved me toward healing.

Changing my patterns

Emotional eating never completely loses its power and it
still seduces me as a way to make life easier. When times are
difficult or I'm feeling down, I occasionally slip into
nurturing myself with cookies or a doughnut. But I keep
striving to recognize my feelings and manage them before I
reach my hand out for food.

I still cry on Mother's Day. But instead of running from my
sadness with a bag of doughnuts in my hand, I wait for the
tears and embrace them when they come. Sometimes I cry in
church, other times with my face buried deep inside my
pillow. I allow myself to cry as long as I need to, and when
I'm done, I remind myself that I've taken another step in my
emotional healing.

Here's the second verse to my poem about emotional eating

I'm not afraid of food
food exists
my emotions exist
but I've unhooked the chain

I choose to feel
and I choose to eat
now I'm no longer a slave
to emotional eating

-- Linda Spangle

(to read the first verse of the poem, go to this link and
scroll to the bottom of the page:
http://www.rapidwtloss.com/index.php?pag
e_id=418)

Next week: My own personal battle with emotional eating
www.WeightLossJoy.com

Edited by: ANGELBELIEVER at: 2/23/2009 (14:08)
Elayne from
Florida Eastern Time Zone

" My goal is to live the truly religious life, and express it in my music. If you live it, when you play, there's no problem because the music is part of the whole thing. To be a musician is really something. It goes very,very deep. My music is the spiritual expression of what I am--my faith, my knowledge, my being." by John Coltrane

Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life!.-Annonymous

Music is a moral l


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