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WATERFELON's Photo WATERFELON SparkPoints: (18,441)
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11/21/11 11:02 P

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I used the quikrete stuff on my pond as well. It's easy to work with, just the bags are heavy to lug around! But if I do decide to pour my own hearth, that's probably what I'd use. I was also looking at some tile products but that's what got me to thinking about the heat ramifications! Then I thought the tiles might be too fragile if a heavy piece of wood got dropped on one. I just don't have any ideas on what to do with it! Thanks!

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MARICOPAGAL's Photo MARICOPAGAL SparkPoints: (1,651)
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11/20/11 7:41 P

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You might try some Quikrete. They sell it at the big box store. It is a form of concrete that you don't have to mix up yourself.

I had a co-worker who put a pond and landscaped his yard with huge boulders using it. I think he found some sort of dye that he added before he formed it into the shapes he wanted. I would think doing a hearth would be easier than him doing his back yard.

Just a thought. Hope it helps.

www.quikrete.com/

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GARDENCHRIS's Photo GARDENCHRIS SparkPoints: (206,073)
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11/20/11 7:18 P

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Good question.... I do know there is cement sealer, not sure what it is though. I'd just go to the box store and ask someone questions, there are bound to be people that can help. good luck, post some pictures!



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WATERFELON's Photo WATERFELON SparkPoints: (18,441)
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11/20/11 7:10 P

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My fireplace was painted cinderblock for many years. It was painted when I bought it, so I just painted it the same color as the walls. Bland........ So I spent some time this year stripping off all the layers of paint-there were a lot more layers than I thought!-and putting up tiles and a nicer mantle frame.

So now it's time to do the hearth. It's not big, approx 60x16. There is old tile now that looks probably original. Several tiles are cracked but the mortar seems to have held up OK. But I think the grout has not. Not sure if that's from the heat of the fire or just plain age-my house is about 40 years old.

So, I'd like to find a material that would be good for a hearth? I know rock would be fabulous, and actually gray cement would work well with the colors I've used, I'm seriously considering making my own cement hearth. I am wondering what to use to seal that down, though? Is regular tile mortar the best material? Cement? I know there is special heat-resistant paint you can buy for fireplaces, is there fire-resistant mortar or grout?

I'm this far into the project and ready to finish it up, but now I'm stumped at the hearth!

Thanks!

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