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NORASPAT's Photo NORASPAT Posts: 31,420
3/4/13 8:11 A

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TUPPERWARE, I came to your page earlier then i saw you on this thread. I have had a number of surgeries mostly on my hands and every time I was asked if I was diabetic. My sugars are under control but once a diabetic always a diabetic even if you control with food and exercise.
You should ALWAYS tell any healthcare provider you are diabetic that way they will be able to help you if you had a Blood sugar issue like a HYPO.
I looked on your page and it looked like you are doing well. I hope so. MY Dh had that surgery because his thumb would barely move from arthritis. Now it moves and it is pain free. I hope your surgery goes as well as his did. Take care Pat in Maine.

Pat in Maine.
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RUSSELL_40's Photo RUSSELL_40 Posts: 16,826
2/19/13 12:50 P

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I think I may have misunderstood the question. It sounds like you are asking about surgery with above average blood sugars, but also if you control it with blood sugars?

I have had both. In 2004 they put my ICD in. They used Insulin in the hospital. In 2006, I had a burst appendix, which required me to be on antibiotics because with my blood sugars being so high, they said I had a 75% risk of infection if the opened me up. So I spent 12 weeks with a tube in my side, strapped to a bag that collected any " liquids " leaking out from the remnants of my burst appendix. Then I had the surgery. After recuperating for 2 weeks, they put me back on a different antibiotic, and 2 weeks later, I had a hernia operation, which lasted 5 hours, since I had the hernia for 10 years. They had to shove 12 feet of intestines back in. I was out of work for 8 months with the 2 surgeries.

Then I got my blood sugars under control, by starting low carb in May 2009. I got off all diabetes meds in May 2010, because I was having low blood sugars. In July 2010, I had my ICD changed, and was home in 2 days. No insulin. Just cut my chest open, switch ICD's, and sew me back up. Much easier. Then right before joining SP, February 2011, I had my gullbladder removed. I went in at 11 a.m., got scheduled for surgery at 6 a.m. the next morning. I woke up in my room around 8 a.m., and by 10, I was walking laps. I went home at 6 p.m.

The difference between surgery with full blown diabetes, and with it under control due to diet and exercise, is recovery time, and less worries about infections.

Edited by: RUSSELL_40 at: 2/19/2013 (12:51)
"We can't solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them "

- Albert Einstein

“Whether you think you can, or you think you can't--you're right.”

- Henry Ford


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BUMPS2's Photo BUMPS2 SparkPoints: (10,189)
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2/12/13 11:46 P

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I believe everyone here! But it is also a great idea to speak with your Endo and be sure that a low carb program will not effect you Adversely. Low carb is not for everyone.

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WOWEETOO's Photo WOWEETOO SparkPoints: (170,976)
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2/12/13 9:40 P

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ask at the hospital for a diabetic clinic or group they would know how to find one for you
the lady mary

TODAY IS LIFE THIS IS NOT A DRESS REHEARSAL

there is no cause when there is no effect km

i can do that, but not on a tuesday
for that is my day of thrust in the opposite direction -
off the starboard bow
over the hurdles,
and down the shute.

last is just the slowest winner. c.hunter boyd

people often say that motivation doesn't last. well neither does bathing - that's why we recommend it daily. zig ziglar

if i stitch fast enough do


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TUPPERWARE1's Photo TUPPERWARE1 Posts: 328
2/12/13 9:12 P

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Thank you Valerie,I have not heard of an endocrinologist as I am from Canada.
That was exactly the message I needed to hear I too feel our GP can not help many of us.
Low carb diet has given me much better testing results.

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VALERIE1619's Photo VALERIE1619 Posts: 970
2/12/13 12:23 P

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I'm afraid I can't really 'instruct' anyone as to insulin use because that's medical advice that I'm not comfortable having someone follow based on my suggestions. What I believe in is asking your doctor (preferably an endocrinologist) if you wouldn't benefit from adding insulin to your regimen.

Unless you're working with an endo, you're likely not getting the gold standard of diabetes care. It's an unfortunate fact but most GPs were educated with a chapter of diabetes info in medical school and that's about it. (That's what several of my docs over the years have admitted). That's why, for many type 2s, the first line of defense is just being handed a prescription for Metformin.

I'm a type 1 (21 years) and my husband is a type 2 (12 years), who was diagnosed by me. I speak from my experience with our diseases. He was slim at diagnosis and gained about 60 pounds over several years while struggling to maintain decent blood sugar control on several oral medications.

He'd watch me test, decide what to eat, and then bolus (inject) the amount of insulin needed to ensure that my blood sugar stayed in range, even after eating. His question was, "how in the heck can my pills handle the extra carbs of a meal, but not make me go low if I don't eat?" He claimed that "insulin makes it look so easy and predictable!". So, I sent him to his doctor to ask about night time insulin injections (also called basal insulin). She agreed, and he began injecting at night. The biggest fear people have is obviously the needle, but he was stunned with how tiny and painless it is. Then, he started seeing how quickly his blood sugar became more level.

At that point, he decided to abandon the oral meds (along with all of their side effects) and opt for insulin for meal boluses. His blood sugar and A1C almost immediately returned to normal levels. Encouraged, he began reducing the amount of carbs he ate, and saw even better results.

18 months ago, he decided to lose the weight he'd gained after diagnosis. He adopted a plan he found online, which is a combination of low carb and small, frequent meals, and has lost 50 pounds so far.

Two things I know for sure:
Diabetes is a carbohydrate-intolerance disease. Your body doesn't handle them well, so why would you eat them? (all of my carbs come from veggies)

Insulin is not a punishment. Your body needs insulin; you don't put soda in your gas tank, do you? Why wouldn't you give your body what it needs?

There are numerous medical studies that point toward people using insulin therapy earlier in their (type 2) diagnosis and doing better than people who muddle through years of oral meds and higher blood sugar. ANY time your blood sugar is over 140 nerve damage can occur.

Again, YMMV (your mileage may vary); you have to choose what you're comfortable with and what you're willing to commit to. If your labs, test results, and weight are great with eating carbs and taking pills, then more power to you! Truly, I loved bread and pasta; they just don't love me back.

But if you're struggling with either blood sugar control, out of range test results, or extra pounds that won't budge, why wouldn't you try a low carb approach for awhile? Then, you may just decide to add insulin to your lifestyle to, if necessary.

Best,
Valerie


Edited by: VALERIE1619 at: 2/12/2013 (23:16)
Valerie
type 1 diabetic,
showing this disease who's boss!

February 2013: NEW GOAL! I've lost 60 pounds to date, so it's time to kick these last few to the curb!


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2/12/13 9:25 A

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well my endo and the anethestist work rather closely..for me since i have autonomic neuropathy and blood sugars drop out at the drop of a hat i have to be at least 200 (when i say drop it just drops) they always take that into consideration as it's easier to keep that stable for myself..and there is no cure and i have a little dog that watches me and let's me know what i can no longer feel and for me there is nothing else like the control you get with insulin for sure
the lady mary

TODAY IS LIFE THIS IS NOT A DRESS REHEARSAL

there is no cause when there is no effect km

i can do that, but not on a tuesday
for that is my day of thrust in the opposite direction -
off the starboard bow
over the hurdles,
and down the shute.

last is just the slowest winner. c.hunter boyd

people often say that motivation doesn't last. well neither does bathing - that's why we recommend it daily. zig ziglar

if i stitch fast enough do


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TUPPERWARE1's Photo TUPPERWARE1 Posts: 328
2/12/13 1:49 A

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Sorry Fancy I missed your post.Valerie please educate us non insulin users the basics on insulin use.I would like to know how I would need to go on it?

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TUPPERWARE1's Photo TUPPERWARE1 Posts: 328
2/12/13 1:39 A

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yes exercise is key but diet is equally important.My health records would of shown I was diabetic but it was never dicussed when I had hand surgery.My blood sugar was lower again this morning.I told a friend who lost his brother to diabetes abou
t the IV pump and sugar line. THANKS for all your wise words.If we get educated to help one person its all worth it.

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FANCYQTR's Photo FANCYQTR Posts: 5,615
2/11/13 11:49 P

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It is something I don't understand if a person is producing plenty of insulin but just insulin resistant. How can injecting more insulin do that much if they are insulin resistant. Apparently when I was diagnosed they also checked my insulin levels and I produce plenty of insulin.

Darlene


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VALERIE1619's Photo VALERIE1619 Posts: 970
2/11/13 10:31 P

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I'm guessing they used insulin in the hospital because it's so much more predictable than pills.

It's the same reason I promote that type 2s who don't want to drastically restrict their carbs should use insulin instead of messing around with pills.

: )

Valerie
type 1 diabetic,
showing this disease who's boss!

February 2013: NEW GOAL! I've lost 60 pounds to date, so it's time to kick these last few to the curb!


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FANCYQTR's Photo FANCYQTR Posts: 5,615
2/11/13 10:21 P

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I had major surgery just 5 months after my diagnosis and I was on metformin rather than just diet and exercise controlled. They took me off my meds while I was in the hospital and put me on insulin when my sugars went up too much. I only had to have 3 insulin injections during the 5 days I was there, I think. I don't know what their reason was for changing it to insulin, but I know that they will not let you have any of your own meds there. They wouldn't even let me have my EMLA which won't do anything to the system, only numbs the skin.

Darlene


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VALERIE1619's Photo VALERIE1619 Posts: 970
2/11/13 11:07 A

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My surgery was 10 hours long, so the anesthesiologist was informed as to how my pump worked, but he also monitored my blood sugar, doing tests every 20 minutes. He did have to make a few small correction boluses. If you can't trust your surgery team to manage your diabetes while you're under anesthesia, who can you trust? : /

And I don't mean to scold, but ANY time you're having ANY medical procedure done, you team simply MUST KNOW you're a diabetic!!! It has so much to do with medications you should/shouldn't have, how you'll heal, how they'll handle your vitals, etc.

My doctor signed off on me handling all aspects o f my diabetes care while I was in the hospital (for five days). So the nurses would ask me periodically what my blood sugar was and I'd tell them. Because I was pumping, they didn't require me to tell them how much insulin I was bolusing.



Valerie
type 1 diabetic,
showing this disease who's boss!

February 2013: NEW GOAL! I've lost 60 pounds to date, so it's time to kick these last few to the curb!


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BUMPS2's Photo BUMPS2 SparkPoints: (10,189)
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2/11/13 1:37 A

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A consistent exercise regiment keeps my glucose lower. I like that cause and effect.

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TUPPERWARE1's Photo TUPPERWARE1 Posts: 328
2/11/13 1:09 A

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Thanks for your posts.I'm having elbow and finger surgery.Ulnar nerve in the elbow and tendon for the finger.An injury that sprung up after I broke the same hand.I did not tell that surgeon about the diabetesI did not think it was necessary..Because of the pain and stress my blood sugars went nuts after I knew I had to have an EKG and blood work and I had major pms.It is (now)not in the normal range but in the range he thought I could obtain.My doctor said the surgeon can lower bs during surgery.I did not care for that answer.

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I.M.MAGIC's Photo I.M.MAGIC Posts: 12,839
2/11/13 12:27 A

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I've had major abdominal surgery, as well as some smaller surgical procedures over the last several years, and Valerie makes a very good point about working closely with your endocrinologist etc prior to being admitted. It's key to a quicker recovery--especially if the surgery involves any part of your digestive system...in which case, glucose in the IV may be just what the doctor ordered!.... LOL
I always take my own meter, so I can monitor for myself... and since I'm on a rather unusual insulin protocol, I take my own of that too... though a member of the hospital staff has to witness all the injections... at least you don't have to worry about THAT...

Hope it all goes well...
Kathy emoticon

"The real secret of success is enthusiasm..." thanks, Walter P. Chrysler. I believe it. That's what I want in my life--to give my imagination a chance, to live with energy and enthusiasm!

Ralph Waldo Emerson said 'Life belongs to the energetic.' But you don't have to be frenetic and hyper--some energy is quiet and steady, like a heartbeat... and that works too! LOL

Life comes in specific increments, which we receive as a gift of one moment at a time. That's why it's called


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VALERIE1619's Photo VALERIE1619 Posts: 970
2/10/13 11:33 P

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My situation's a little different since I'm type 1, but I had a 10-hour major spinal surgery in April. Since I wear a pump and insisted on wearing it through the operation, I worked closely with my endocrinologist and anesthesiologist prior to surgery. We determined that letting my blood sugar run a little higher than my usual target of 100 was prudent. In fact, recent protocol has type 1s aim for a target of closer to 120 for the first few days post surgery.

You'll also want to make sure you're not getting glucose in your IVs.

Good luck!


Valerie
type 1 diabetic,
showing this disease who's boss!

February 2013: NEW GOAL! I've lost 60 pounds to date, so it's time to kick these last few to the curb!


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TUPPERWARE1's Photo TUPPERWARE1 Posts: 328
2/10/13 11:30 P

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Have you had surgery with above normal blood sugar? Controlled only by diet and exercise.

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