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TOPIC:   transitioning from 10km to half marathon 


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SUNSHINE20113
SUNSHINE20113's Photo SparkPoints: (23,931)
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5/19/13 5:07 P

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Thanks for all the comments - especially the ones reminding me to enjoy myself!!
Today I went out and took some water with me and I did notice a difference. I have a 10km race next Monday, so this will be a tapering week for me. I just ran a straight 10km tonight. After last week being quite a tough run for me, I thought it best to stick with something my body knows and likes today!
After all this advice, I think I will go with alternating between a 10km and increasing my distance by a km every other week; so, week 1: 10km, week 2: 12km (I've already reached this distance); Week 3: 10km; Week 4: 13km, etc. When I reach 15km, I'll see about changing my static distance to something greater.
I'll keep you updated!!


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TIMOTHYNOHE
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5/16/13 12:14 A

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Wow, you have been well cared for by the others. So the only thing I will add is to remember that we are doing this for fun. Remember that. If you reach a distance that ceases to be fun, don't do that. For me it was the full marathon. I wanted the challenge and I decided that it was not my cup of tea.

so, have fun.

Start by doing what is necessary, then do what is possible and suddenly you will be doing the impossible -- St Francis of Assisi

Rock 'n' Roll Dublin Half Marathon, Dublin, Ireland, 8/5/2013
ie.competitor.com/dublin/




KAPELAKIN
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5/16/13 12:02 A

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You can still do your faster, shorter runs during the week. That will help you run a good pace in your HM race. For your long slow distance runs, a good approach, since you have several months, is to choose a day of the week for your long run, and add a mile each week until you're up to about 10 miles, then alternate 10 miles one week, with an added mile the next week - i.e. 10/11/10/12/10/13. With my first half last year, my longest training run was 12 miles, and then I made the mistake of doing a fairly fast 8 mile run the Saturday before the race, and didn't perform up to my goal on race day. I did my third half a few weeks ago, and made a point of running a couple 14-15 mile long runs in the month leading up to the race, and then only doing a an easier 8 mile run the week before, and it made all the difference in the world on race day. Exceeding the race distance a couple times did a lot for my confidence even if it didn't do a lot physiologically.

According to this running time predictor, you'd be shooting for about a 1:45 HM, which is about an 8 minute mile (you're fast, by the way!). So on those LSD days, my suggestion would be to shoot for about a 9:30 pace. My HM pace is about 9:07 and I commonly average around 10-11 minute miles on LSD runs; you should be tired at the end, but not completely drained. The LSD is about learning to be on your feet and moving for an extended period of time, not necessarily about sustaining a fast pace over distance; you can do that on race day when you are fully rested and properly fueled for an all-out effort.

Good luck and have fun!

Voluntary Discomfort is the secret cornerstone of strength. We build our whole lives around increasing comfort and avoiding discomfort, and yet by doing so we are drinking a can of Weakness Tonic with every morning’s breakfast. ~Mr. Money Mustache
5K PR: 23:40
10K PR: 48:57
HM PR: 1:59:37
30K: 2:57:44


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OFFWERUN
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5/15/13 6:15 P

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Hi,

My take is since you have been running for some time now, you do not have to abandon your speed to take on the half marathon distance. My suggestion is for you to visit the McMillan Running Calculator (see link below) which will help you determine a good training pace for your LSD runs, intervals, tempos, etc--Also, find a good training program that takes you from where you are right now to where you want to be--in other words, if you are consistently running 5-7 miles for your LSD runs you don't want to start with a training program that begins your LSD runs in the 3 mile range.

www.mcmillanrunning.com/

As for water, this is far more important than a fueling source. Either locate a trail with water fountains or bring some with you. As to how much you need will vary according to the ambient temp, the humidity, your sweat rate, radiant heat etc.

As for what is a long run in half-marathon terms--it's generally the longest run of the week--which once again will vary according to your training program.

Injuries happen even to the best of us--in fact 80% of all runners will experience at least one injury in their running career. While many runners blame injuries on their shoes, lack of fueling, etc...know that many injuries are caused from not allowing enough recovery between your runs AND not building the ancillary muscles of the hips to support running. Below is a link to my running coach's exercises he has me do every run.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=2GLrKr54yA0

I hope this helps! HAPPY RUNNING!

Nancy

ACE Certified Personal Trainer, RRCA Certified Running Coach

Member of the NTX Runners, DRC, Rockwall Running Club, Plano Pacers, NYRR, Team Runnersconnect

"No weight is ever PERFECT enough to do the enormous job of CREATING happiness!" From The Don't Diet, Live-it Workbook




PASTAFARIAN
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5/15/13 6:13 P

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I like the way you phrase that - that you're comfortable with the 10K distance but want to try something more. I wish everybody would approach a HM the way you're doing it.

My answers to your questions:

- Yes, you'll get to speed up. But a HM requires you to train your muscles in a different way than for a 10K so you have to work on that first.

- Yes, for anything over an hour, most people should have water. You may not want to drink it at first, but you'll eventually reach the point where you happily take water even on your 10K runs.

- A long run is not precisely defined but I'll give my indirect version: It's your longest run of the week, done at a pace which you feel like you can keep up indefinitely - or at least as long as you like. (Notice that this definition is not specific to a HM. It works for 10K, HM, or any distance!)

PS: Don't forget about 10M races. They are a nice intermediate distance between 10K and HM.

Edited by: PASTAFARIAN at: 5/15/2013 (18:16)

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SUNSHINE20113
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5/15/13 5:51 P

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So far my longest race has been 10km. My PB is 48.16 (or something like that) and I really love that distance. However, as I've been doing that for about two years now, I felt it was time for a new challenge and signed up for my first half, which will be in October.
I've already asked some of these questions, but will ask again:
I know I need to slow down as I increase my distance time. Do I ever get to speed up again?
Do I need to take water with me on longer runs?
What is considered a long run in half marathon terms?
Thanks! My goal is to do this transition as injury free as possible!


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