Author: Sorting Last Post on Top ↓ Message:
PASTAFARIAN's Photo PASTAFARIAN Posts: 1,938
2/24/13 10:18 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Connie, It's great that you're already running that distance but I can't give you much more guidance without an actual race time. Has nothing to do with the treadmail vs roads. It has to do with how hard you're willing to push yourself in race conditions and I can't tell that from any of the figures you've given. (Even your fastest pace of 6.1mph, you characterized as "reasonably comfortable" and I just don't know what that means.) Do your 10K race and come back with an actual race time and race pace!

Preferably do several 10K races because everyone goes out too slow/fast on their first 10K race and maybe second or third as well. It will take some practice to get a 10K time that truly reflects your conditioning and spirit!

By the way, I encourage you to think in minutes/mile, not mph. Although they're equivalent, minutes/mile is more natural for reasons I won't go into; Indeed, when you start doing races, you'll see that minutes/mile is what everyone uses. For example, pacers will be organized by minutes/mile, not mph. Waves will be organized similarly. And so on.

Edited by: PASTAFARIAN at: 2/25/2013 (08:58)
 current weight: 154.0 
 
195
184.75
174.5
164.25
154
CONNIEWILDE's Photo CONNIEWILDE SparkPoints: (4,011)
Fitness Minutes: (9,215)
Posts: 60
2/24/13 4:33 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Pasta, thanks for your comments! I have never run a 10K, or technically even a 5K race (though I run farther than that every day as a part of my training...I've just never actually been in a race with anyone but myself). However, based on my stretched out and largely treadmill based (at least until it gets warmer in Chi), version of Hal Higdon's training plan, I'm scheduled to run 6 miles in mid March, and a 10K race in early May. Still several months from my September 8th HM. As yet, I'm running (well, jogging) my long runs at a constant 5.5 mph, and completing my shorter training runs at whatever faster pace feels reasonably comfortable (usually bouncing around between 5.7 and 6.1 mph).
Though it's still super early in my (largely self guided) training, and I openly admit that I'm a relatively new runner, this seems like it should be a manageable training progression. Do you agree? What changes might you suggest? Thanks again!

 current weight: 138.6 
 
161
152
143
134
125
PASTAFARIAN's Photo PASTAFARIAN Posts: 1,938
2/24/13 12:56 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I don't think anyone has directly tackled the 2nd part of Connie's question - How do you know what is the right pace (especially for long runs) and whether to run vs walk/run. So I will stick my neck out and offer my opinion:

Run vs Run/Walk?
If you've run 10K races, then train to run an HM.
If you've run/walked 10K races, then train to run/walk an HM.
If you've done neither, first train for a 10K race. Forget about an HM until you're comfortable with 10K races. (Ideally, also 10M races.)

Pace?
Go to www.mcmillanrunning.com and enter your 10K time and select HM as your goal race. Get your predicted HM time. Then click on the tab for Training Paces to generate your various training paces. For example, if I enter a 10K time of 1 hour, it predicts I am capable of a 2:14 HM with a long run pace of 10:35 to 11:48.

Of course these are generalizations and Nancy's point - that everyone is different - is correct, but you need some place to start and these two answers are a reasonable place from which to start.


 current weight: 154.0 
 
195
184.75
174.5
164.25
154
SCHOOLNURSE86's Photo SCHOOLNURSE86 Posts: 870
2/23/13 10:27 A

Reply
I love everything Coach Nancy said!

Depending on my work schedule, during the winter I do a fair number of my weekday runs on the treadmill at 5 AM (I work for a school district, so my summers are much more free). Weekends I run outside.

You can make this an advantage! Use your treadmill time to focus on your running form. You can also get a good feeling for your perceived exertion based on how fast you are going (and I agree, time is NOT critical for you now, just plan to finish). And it's easy to work some hill training in.

I have never felt that doing some of my winter training on the treadmill has held me back. Now, I must disclose I am one of the oddballs that doesn't mind the treadmill. Nothing beats running outside, but sometimes vegging out with my music, not worrying about getting hit by a car, abducted, bit by a coyote....can be nice :).

Good Luck!!

Edited by: SCHOOLNURSE86 at: 2/23/2013 (10:33)
Mary


"I just felt like running." Forrest Gump
SP_COACH_NANCY SparkPoints: (158,833)
Fitness Minutes: (112,042)
Posts: 46,222
2/22/13 9:35 A

Send Private Message
Reply
Hi CONNIEWILDE,

I agree with Sarah...treadmill training is still training and the studies prove that your body undergoes the same physiological demands as you would outside, so if you have to spend the next few weeks running inside I would not sweat it. Your body is changing. In fact I did 95% of my runs (yes even my long runs on the treadmill) when I trained for my first 1/2 marathon 5 years ago. Just make sure you raise the incline to at least 1-2%.

I think too many people worry about their pace too much. If this is your first half-marathon your goal should be to get the miles on your legs over a period of time. You can worry about pacing later in your running career--training at race pace, later. In fact I just read a really great article regarding those who focus too much on a 'certain' pace during their training do not succeed as well as though who train at their current level of fitness and move forward. When you race to train your body is more vulnerable to injuries. I train with a very well renown running expert out of Colorado. He is teaching me that my LSD (long slow distance) runs have been run entirely too fast so he is bringing me back down to the world of reality. In fact my LSD runs are done between a 10:30 and and 11 minute per mile pace a solid minute per mile slower than I can achieve on race day, but that is the goal...train when training and race when racing and allow the energy systems and your body to prepare for the big day.

As far as training programs...just remember there is no standard training program that works for everyone. Nor is any program ever written in stone so that if your body is not ready to transition to the next level, it's OK to repeat weeks. The one lesson I tell my runners and that is to train where you are, not where you want to be come Sept 8th.

HAPPY SPARK RUNNING!

Coach Nancy

LOGOULD's Photo LOGOULD SparkPoints: (95,905)
Fitness Minutes: (37,425)
Posts: 4,491
2/22/13 9:09 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Having run that one as my first half a couple of years ago, I would advise a couple of things. Get running outside as soon as possible and once a week or so, on CONCRETE - because that is the surface you will run on for most of that race. I had been running and training outside on asphalt primarily and was not prepared for the difference in the pounding your body will take on the concrete. Also, be prepared to change out your shoes more often when training and running on concrete surfaces. Don't let it scare you, just run smart and be prepared. Other than the surface, it's a great event.

"Success is the result of what you do when the Woo Hoo is all through....."-ON2VICTORY (Robert)

"The miracle isn't that I finished...the miracle is I had the courage to start." - John 'The Penguin



 current weight: 10.3  over
 
15
7.5
0
-7.5
-15
JECKIE's Photo JECKIE Posts: 9,692
2/22/13 8:23 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Definitely get running outside when you can, but also don't freak. Treadmill training is still training. Living in Boston I do a good deal of treadmill work during the winter, and while my legs are sore when I hit the streets again it fades fairly quickly.

Jeckie (aka. Sarah) - Lowell, MA - EST
Half Fanatic #3032

I have no "goal weight". MY goal is to be as healthy, strong and active as I can be. This isn't about my relationship with the scale but my relationship with the world.

Looking for recipes? I keep a Paleo-friendly recipe board on Pinterest! http://pinterest.com/jeckie/mostly-paleo/


 November Minutes: 1,975
 
0
500
1000
1500
2000
SEABREEZE65's Photo SEABREEZE65 Posts: 10,912
2/22/13 6:30 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I agree - transitioning to running outside is important.

Also, everyone is different on how they train and then run a marathon. For me, I am a Galloway girl and use run-walk intervals. Pace is an important factor in longer distances. If you use, for example, McMillan's pace calculator you will get an idea of how slow to run your long slow runs and what your predicted race pace should be - although it is definitely okay to run slower than this - especially on a first HM.

Good luck - have fun - and get outside!!!

"It's not how old you are, it's how you are old."

"I am still learning." Michelangelo




 November Minutes: 587
 
0
375
750
1125
1500
TIMOTHYNOHE's Photo TIMOTHYNOHE Posts: 4,317
2/22/13 12:05 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Go on up to Fleet Feet (I went to it in July, it's right there next to Second City) and sign up for their half marathon training. Or maybe X-Sports has something. Running on the street is nothing like running on a treadmill as you so rightly observed. Running in a program also allows you to make running buddies.

Or try this organization: www.cararuns.org/Training.aspx

Get out there and hit the street.



Edited by: TIMOTHYNOHE at: 2/22/2013 (00:06)
Start by doing what is necessary, then do what is possible and suddenly you will be doing the impossible -- St Francis of Assisi

Rock 'n' Roll Dublin Half Marathon, Dublin, Ireland, 8/5/2013
ie.competitor.com/dublin/


CONNIEWILDE's Photo CONNIEWILDE SparkPoints: (4,011)
Fitness Minutes: (9,215)
Posts: 60
2/21/13 11:08 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Hi, all.Today I mentioned to my workout buddy that I saw a bunch of people registering for the Chicago Marathon. I know I'm not ready for a full, but I told her that I'd been thinking of signing up for the half. Well, she posted it on Facebook, and now we're committed! Race day: September 8th!
So tonight at the gym, I wanted to gauge just how much training I need to do. I ran 4.5 miles in 49 minutes (a constant 5.5 mph), and only sort of felt like dying after...I probably could've pushed out another mile if I'd had to. So I feel pretty confident that by September I'll be more than capable of hitting the magic 13.1. On a treadmill. Obvious problem: Lake Shore Drive is not a treadmill! How, oh how, do I transition myself from running on a treadmill (where I have to press a button to slow down, and where pacing is automatic) to running outside where it's oh so easy to slow down and walk for awhile? I've read many posts on here from people suggesting that treadmill runners start by doing our long runs outside, but I almost feel that it would be easier for me to do my shorter runs outside. But then would I be prepared come race day? I don't know.
Another question: I like the look of Hal Higdon's training program. But he doesn't specify speeds at all. I get that that makes his program adaptable to a large group of people, but he doesn't give any advice on speeding up. For those of you who've done this before, do you stick to a constant slower pace, or do you mix it up (run for awhile, then walk/jog for a while).
I'm sorry this is rambling and full of questions, but I'm feeling a bit overwhelmed at my accidental decision, and any help would be greatly appreciated!
Thanks!

 current weight: 138.6 
 
161
152
143
134
125
Page: 1 of (1)  

Report Innappropriate Post

Other Half Marathon Introduce Yourself to Team Forum Posts

Topics: Last Post:
Good Morning 11/2/2013 8:55:31 AM
Addiction 10/19/2013 3:23:39 AM
Couch to Half Marathon = Crazy? 8/2/2014 3:43:48 PM
New to Forum 8/8/2014 7:05:02 PM
Finally registered for 1st Half! 5/15/2014 5:52:34 AM

Thread URL: http://www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/team_messageboard_thread.asp?board=-1x1918x52229088

Review our Community Guidelines