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MBSHAZZER's Photo MBSHAZZER Posts: 18,423
1/31/13 4:39 P

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It's totally possible - my coworker just started running in March and finished a full marathon in January. The trick is to listen to your body and not overdo the mileage.

I agree with the others that your long run should be outside. TM running is a great way to maintain fitness if the weather is dreadful, but it is not the same as running outside. When you do run on the TM, set the incline to 1 or 2% so that you get a bit of simulated "wind resisitance".

Good luck and have fun!

"Success is not final, failure is not fatal; it is the courage to continue that counts" - Winston Churchill

2012 Running Mileage: 2,065


KAPELAKIN's Photo KAPELAKIN Posts: 1,971
1/28/13 10:01 P

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I think it depends on what your goals are for the HM. If you just want to complete it, then I think May is reasonable. However, if you want to run the whole thing in a certain amount of time, you might be better off to target a fall HM instead, especially if you can't get back to running outdoors very soon. You could do a shorter race or two in the spring to help prepare. With that said, it IS possible to run outdoors in most conditions. The only thing that's been keeping me inside this winter is really bad ice (snow is fine), or the really stormy days. You might be surprised that running in cold weather and even rain or snow isn't as bad as it might seem so long as you're properly outfitted for the weather.

Voluntary Discomfort is the secret cornerstone of strength. We build our whole lives around increasing comfort and avoiding discomfort, and yet by doing so we are drinking a can of Weakness Tonic with every morning’s breakfast. ~Mr. Money Mustache
5K PR: 23:40
10K PR: 48:57
HM PR: 1:59:37
30K: 2:57:44


WINDSURFNERD's Photo WINDSURFNERD Posts: 770
1/28/13 10:17 A

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I find that--more than just covering the distance--my training is a series of trial-&-error experiments that I do on myself. The longer the race, the more things there are to figure out: pacing, nutrition, clothes (chafing!), etc. These training runs are where I figure out what works for me: how fast can I go, how/when/what can I eat to refuel, how hot/cold do I get...hope I'm not making it too complicated!

Because of all that, treadmill doesn't do much for me except to keep fit. The conditions don't match closely enough for me to use the information from the run to figure out "what works". I think this is why Coach Nancy and others are suggesting that you do at least some of your runs outdoors.

Anyway, your plan looks great so enjoy your training and have fun at your race!
Naomi

A ship in the harbor is safe. But that's not what ships are built for.

- Anonymous


LBTHOMASJR's Photo LBTHOMASJR SparkPoints: (74,214)
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1/28/13 9:16 A

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Maria - It is certainly possible to train for a HM utilizing the treadmill, just be advised that there are real advantages to training outdoors as per Coach Nancy's reply. Perhaps a good "compromise" would be to try to commit to doing your weekly Long Run outdoors while doing the shorter runs throughout the rest of the week on the treadmill. This is essentially what I do from about late November through mid-February when it is simply too dark too early for me to run outdoors after my work day is over (or before it starts).

Don't get too overwhelmed. You can do this!

The block of granite which was an obstacle in the path of the weak becomes a steppingstone in the path of the strong.
- Thomas Carlyle

PR's
5K - 23:45 (6 races)
10K - 50:12 (3 races)
10 Mile - 1:27:07 (2 races)
Half Marathon - 1:56:35 (1 Race)


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TIMOTHYNOHE's Photo TIMOTHYNOHE Posts: 4,317
1/27/13 10:50 P

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Jeff Galloway's plan is a comfortable way to run half and full marathons. OK, let's be honest. There is no comfortable way to run that far. What his program did for me was to give me a way to break up what appears to be impossible into smaller managable intervals with short rests in between.

Start by doing what is necessary, then do what is possible and suddenly you will be doing the impossible -- St Francis of Assisi

Rock 'n' Roll Dublin Half Marathon, Dublin, Ireland, 8/5/2013
ie.competitor.com/dublin/


SP_COACH_NANCY SparkPoints: (158,833)
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1/27/13 10:09 P

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Maria,

There are no right or wrong answers. Some new runners can prepare for a half-marathon in less than 6 months as long as they have a running base--which you do.

That being said, go with the training program that starts you out where you currently are...not where you want to be and be willing to add in wiggle room for any niggles that may come up should you find the need to repeat some weeks, or if you get sick or something comes up with your training situation.

Running on the treadmill is fine for some of your runs, but what outdoor running allows you to do is develop your sense for pacing your runs as well as allowing time for your body to adapt to a different running surface.

I hope this helps!

Coach Nancy

MARIA28921 SparkPoints: (26,378)
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1/27/13 9:59 P

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Hi, I just joined the group. I'm pretty new to running and would love some advice from the pros!

Background info- I started running in October using the couch to 5k program. I was not exercising before that point. I completed c25k in Dec and continued running 2-4 miles 3 times a week. About mid December I switched from running outside to the treadmill due to weather. In January I started training for a half marathon using this plan. http://www.halfmarathons.net/training_tips
_schedule_20_weeks.html I just finished week four. I'd like to sign up for a half marathon on May 18th.

Questions-
1. Is this a reasonable goal? I've heard you should be consistently running for a year before doing a half marathon.

2. If it is doable, is the training plan I'm using okay? I've heard good things about Hal higdon's and Jeff Galloway's plans too.

3. Is using the treadmill going to make things too hard later on?

Thank you for any help you can give. I'm currently suffering from information overload and and worried I'm doing everything wrong.

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