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HTHOMAS_30's Photo HTHOMAS_30 Posts: 445
3/29/13 9:59 P

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Have any of you walked a 1/2 marathon? Any tips? My sister and I are training to walk one in May.

SJSTUCKEY's Photo SJSTUCKEY Posts: 15
3/21/13 2:40 P

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This is FANTASTIC, GLADGAD!! Thanks for the menu!! Exactly what I'm looking for.

And yeah - now I've got a good collection of tech shirts to help with the wicking...

I've okay shoes (some lightweight New Balance runners I found at Marshall's), but it's about time to think about a new pair. The BF *swears* by Newtons... might give them a look-see.

Cheers!

"I go to meet a great perhaps..." - Unknown


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SCHOOLNURSE86's Photo SCHOOLNURSE86 Posts: 870
3/21/13 10:27 A

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SJSTUCKEY I think you made a great decision, and echo every thing coach Nancy said. Best wishes!

Mary


"I just felt like running." Forrest Gump
KANDOLAKER's Photo KANDOLAKER Posts: 1,902
3/21/13 10:20 A

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Congrats on your success on your 10k - wow, you are moving along. Just great plans for the rest of the year - you have so got this! Best wishes with your training and way to go!!

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“There are two primary choices in life: to accept conditions as they exist, or accept the responsibility for changing them”
¯ Denis Waitley

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SJSTUCKEY's Photo SJSTUCKEY Posts: 15
3/20/13 1:17 P

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Wow! I thank all of you for your input - and am sorry I didn't notice all these posts until now (I'm going to have to toggle some setting somewhere). But I have an UPDATE on all this running business! emoticon

First, I didn't do the half marathon on January 5. Instead, I transferred my registration to a 5K and, while I wasn't able to recoup the difference in cost, it was a MUCH better decision for me physically and mentally/emotionally. I finished the 5K in a little over 38 minutes - so, about 12+ minutes per mile. Not a bad place to start.

My next goal was a 10K on March 10. This gave me about 2 months to train/build up to that. I had a short bout with this year's flu (yuck), but because I'd been consistently making time to work out 5 days per week (some in the gym, some outdoor running), I was able to kick it pretty quickly. On March 10, not only was I fully comfortable with the distance the entire way (I only walked at the water stations - just long enough to drink the water and move on), but I shaved about a minute off my pace. I finished the 10K in 1:11:50 with a pace of 11:35/mile.

Now, I have plans to run a half-marathon in November - which is a good 6 months away. I'd like to find at least 1 more 10K and maybe a 15K to aim for between now and then, but I feel like I'm on the right track. Even more exciting - my BF just did the LA Marathon this past weekend... and I'm totally inspired to do the same next year!

Here are the few things that helped me to mentally develop a plan to get to the gym to run:

First, I had to make a personal commitment to be consistent with my workouts. So, I chose to hit the gym on M, T, Th & F - and then do a longer, outdoor run on Saturdays. Wednesdays and Sundays I rested. I would run on the treadmill (I listen to podrunner for the music and the guided training) and I would alternate days on the elliptical. (Recently, I've added strength training and have *instantly* noticed a difference in my endurance).

Mornings (as much as I hate to admit it) work best as far as picking the TIME to fit in a workout. The gym is practically vacant at that hour, so searching for parking is never a deterrent. Even better, I feel energized all day and by the time I get home, I have more time THEN to wind down from my day. (Added benefit: somehow I end up EARLY to everything, which just allows me to relax and not rush throughout the day.)

To manage the mornings, I pack my gym bag with the next day's clothes & toiletries, my lunch cooler with breakfast & lunch (all self-made meals I've prepped and stuck in the freezer), and set out my workout clothes **in the bathroom** the night before. Then, I go to bed at 9pm(ish) and wake up at 5am (yeah, I hit the snooze once or twice), but the FIRST thing I do is put the workout clothes on. Everything else is packed, so I feed the cat and head out before I can talk myself out of it. I'm out the door by 5:30am and on a treadmill by 5:45am.

Thank you all again for your feedback! I'd love to read more about how YOU are progressing in your running & fitness goals! AND - if you have any other ideas on how to increase my distances (for that half in November 2013!!), I'd love to hear it!

"I go to meet a great perhaps..." - Unknown


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SWIMBIKERUN2006's Photo SWIMBIKERUN2006 SparkPoints: (2,200)
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10/29/12 10:39 A

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In agreement with all that have posted so far. 10 weeks to train for HM seems barely enough; though with that being said, I accomplished my first HM with a 12 week training plan with ZERO running when I started. So if you are doing 3 miles...you can conservatively accomplish this goal if you are not too proud to do some walking.

By rushing the process, you risk injury- not fun. Also, another thing to consider is your overall endurance. I had been doing endurance sports for years prior to my first HM- so my body was used to the long physical bout it takes to do HM.

As for shoes & clothes. IT's already been said. RUN AWAY from cotton. Invest in a basic set of running clothes (which can vary depending on where you live). And if you live near a running store, get a gait analysis for a good fitting shoes. Otherwise, www.roadrunnersports.com has shoes broken down into categories based on your arch and pronation tendencies. Shoes is not a place where you want to skimp!! Spend the cash- skimp on gloves, hats & shirts.

I don't remember if you mentioned which HM you were doing. But either way, best of luck to you!!

PS....walking is okay :))

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WINDSURFNERD's Photo WINDSURFNERD Posts: 770
10/26/12 7:11 P

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My first HM is in a couple weeks so I'm no expert but I can see Coach Nancy's point. I felt that my 12-week training program was *barely* enough time to get ready...an 8-10 week runup seems super-aggressive. As the long runs got over 10miles, I found myself needing "cutback weeks" to recover but then I'm no spring-chicken :)

Best of luck to you whichever event you decide to take on!
Naomi

A ship in the harbor is safe. But that's not what ships are built for.

- Anonymous


GLADGAD's Photo GLADGAD SparkPoints: (36,229)
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10/25/12 2:18 P

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I have to agree with Nancy. 10 weeks to a half marathon, is not much time, especially since you say that you have not been consistently running. Fang, you were already training daily and building connective tissues, muscle and bone; you may not realize how much advantage you have over someone who is not currently on a daily or even consistent workout schedule.

With all that being said, when you do decide on a half marathon, here is a 3 day a week, 12 week beginner's program that I have used for several halfs. It's on my blog: http://www.sparkpeople.com/mypage_public_j
ournal_individual.asp?blog_id=3413896. If you have any questions or can't understand it, please Spark Mail me and I'll help you with it.

As far as weight loss/nutrition goes, you can lose weight while training. I lost 13 lbs over a 5 month period while marathon training. I wasn't overweight to begin with - 130 lbs at 5'3" and I weighed 117 lbs the day before the race. However, just because I was marathon training, that didn't mean I could eat anything I wanted. I realized that I had to be extra careful with my food because I needed my biggest bang for the buck, nutritionally speaking. Every calorie I ate had to have the best nutritional benefit for me. I ate mostly whole foods and I cooked and prepared everything. Occasionally I would eat out and even then I would keep it to whole foods. My diet mainly consisted of:

PRE-RUN MORNING SNACK: Granola bar and water.
ON THE RUN (if more than an hour): Hammergel; if longer than 2 hours I would also take some electrolytes and liquid nutrition like Accelerade or Perpetuem.
BREAKFAST: eggs, quinoa, beans, fruit, spinach, whole grain cereal with 1% (not skim) milk, yogurt turkey bacon/sausage, soy sausage, feta cheese, whole grain toast, whole wheat wraps. Not all of this at one sitting, but I would mix things up. For example I would make spinach, beans, and quinoa the night before and scramble eggs in the morning. Mix all that together in a wrap with a little feta cheese and/or salsa, with some fresh fruit (not juice) on the side. Or mix yogurt, berries, and lowfat granola together.
SNACK: handful of nuts, a piece of fruit and some yogurt
LUNCH: Colorful salad with salad greens, red peppers, tomatoes, carrots, purple cabbage, broccoslaw, or any other veggie I had in the refrigrator. Top with chick peas, beans, and/or chicken or fish.
SNACK: Veggies, fruit, nuts, seeds, yogurt, plus 1-2 oz of dark (70%) organic chocolate
DINNER: Protein (chicken, fish, tofu, beans), whole grain (sweet brown rice, quinoa), and veggies.
SNACK: small bowl of cereal before going to bed or air popped popcorn (light or no butter - NOT microwaved)
I drank mainly water, but had 1-2 cups of coffee in the morning, and green tea if I wanted something else with my meals other than water.
My meals were not large and I don't eat until I'm stuffed - I only eat until I am not hungry. Eating several times a day also keeps me feeling full and I never had a sugar crash.

As far as what clothing to wear, you want to stay away from cotton. Cotton absorbs and holds onto moisture causing chafing, plus it just gets heavy. Look for tech fabrics. If you are on a budget I have found a brand called Aspire to be affordable and good quality for the price (you can find this in Sports Authority). Personally I like the running shorts with the built in panties because wearing undies on the run can chafe. I also like tri shorts, which are like compression (bike) shorts with a much small chamois in the crotch (also wear these commando). These are perfect for running in the rain or high humdity because regular running shorts will stick to your skin and ride up if it's wet.

As far as shoes go, you need a professional to analyze your gait to determine what type of shoes you should wear. Go to your local mom & pop running store - someone there will be able to help you. DO NOT go by brand name or by advertisements. What works well for one runner will injure another. And for gosh sakes, don't go into a chain sporting goods store and ask the clerk there. They have no idea and will probably hand you a Nike that looks cool or is in some hot color (not that there's anything wrong with Nikes - it's just what people buy because of advertising).

Good luck with your HM journey. If you plan it right you will have a good, challenging training period followed by an injury-free and successful race.

-Carolyn

"God gave you your body as a gift, so you should take care of it." - My Mom
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10/25/12 9:00 A

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While I understand people believe I am too conservative in my approach to recommendations, but my advice is not based on my thoughts, but by spending many hours reading and discussing with experts about the proper way to train and get the best results while remaining injury free. And while I agree that we are all an experiment of one, the mind is so much more powerful than the physiological changes that must take place in the body in order to run, yes even walk a race of this distance.

Coach Nancy

FANGFACEKITTY's Photo FANGFACEKITTY SparkPoints: (72,468)
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10/25/12 1:18 A

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As the unscientific runner newbie voice who knows nothing of the health and science behind running I can only offer you my personal experience.

I started walking in January, running in March and was up to several 5k races by June. I ran regularly - 3 or times per week, and mostly on a treadmill. I started training for my first HM in July, the HM was in September. So I had just over 2 months to go from 3.1 to 13.1 miles. I did it without injury, without walking and without feeling like I was going to die. I felt pretty good by the end of the race, actually.

That said, my personal opinion is it is up to you, everyone reacts differently to the training. I started from a 6 month long regular running program with strength training and karate training several times per week as well; I was fit and used to daily exercise by that point. OK, yes, I know, 6 months is not a long time to have been a runner/walker, my point is I had already developed a regular running program, the only difference in July is that I started upping my miles a little bit every week. I learned the hard way not to up them too much at one time, and also started learning about proper hydration and fueling. My first real long run - 10 miles - was an eye opener. I also would skip a long run week here & there depending on how my knees and body were feeling from the last long run.

The most important thing is I gave myself permission from the beginning to walk if I needed to and to miss my time goal if I needed to. I really wanted the HM as a personal goal, but I wanted injury even less.

Coach Nancy & the more experienced runners urge you to postpone your HM for very sound reasons. I don't necessarily agree with all of the reasons, again I can only go by my personal experience for me, myself and I. I don't think a January HM is impossible or necessarily unsafe, it is all in how your body will react to the needed training and if you are disciplined enough to do it - which includes backing off and re-evaluating your goal if necessary to avoid injury. And remember 100% running is not required, it's not about how you do the miles, it's about the fact that you do the miles.

There will always be HMs out there to run, only you can determine if this is the right one for you.

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EMMANYC's Photo EMMANYC Posts: 1,702
10/24/12 10:27 P

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I agree with Coach Nancy. I'd encourage you to consider skipping the event and finding another HM later, or converting to a lower distance at the same event (e.g., a 5K or 10K on the same weekend).

With respect to some of the questions you asked, one thing to consider as well is that many people who train for an endurance event like a half marathon or full marathon find it very difficult to lose much (if any) weight at the same time. That will be less of an issue if you're training for a 5K or 10K instead.



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TIMOTHYNOHE's Photo TIMOTHYNOHE Posts: 4,317
10/24/12 10:12 P

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Have you considered skipping the January half and finding another in March? ANd in the meantime getting into a training program?


Start by doing what is necessary, then do what is possible and suddenly you will be doing the impossible -- St Francis of Assisi

Rock 'n' Roll Dublin Half Marathon, Dublin, Ireland, 8/5/2013
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10/24/12 6:38 P

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SJSTUCKEY,

I think you may want to re-evaluate your goal, if you have not been running consistently for at least a year. The reason, you cannot rush the process to become a runner...you are approximately 10 weeks out and to build the type of mileage that you will need to do in the time-frame given may leave you at a risk for injury. My suggestion is to find a good half-marathon walking program (Hal Higdon has one) and focus on this and then consider taking on running a half sometime later in the year when you have more time to develop the bones, muscles and connective tissue, not to mention the energy systems to run a race of this duration.

RUN SPARK STRONG!

Coach Nancy

SJSTUCKEY's Photo SJSTUCKEY Posts: 15
10/24/12 6:10 P

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Hey, SparkFriends -

I'm running my first half marathon on January 5. I'm a relatively active person, but everytime I get started on a new exercise regimen, something crops up: my busy work schedule, a cold, a complicated series of errands, a small bit of "bad" news - it's usually something easily surmountable, but it tends to knock me off course.

Since I have TWO MONTHS to train for this half marathon, what's the best way to wrap my brain around the training I will have to do to get there?? (BTW - I can run a good 2 1/2 - 3 miles on the treadmill, but haven't done much outdoor running in at least a year.)

Things I'd like to know: an easy training schedule I can stick to; CLOTHING (which kind of shoes, in particular); NUTRITION (how do I stick to my weight loss goals and still get the fuel I need to keep running?); what kinds of "road blocks" can I expect along the way so I won't let it get me down or steer me off course...etc?

Thanks so much!
:)

"I go to meet a great perhaps..." - Unknown


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