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BELLOYA's Photo BELLOYA SparkPoints: (2,968)
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2/5/10 5:08 A

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I am glad that you are getting started! don't worry about your fat tires. They'll lose weight as you do. My sister does cycle touring and loves it. She toured all over ireland last summer with her twin. Road riding is scary at first but the more you do it the better it will feel. Just always keep in mind to wear a helmet use hand signs and give the giant hunks of metal taking up your road space known as cars the right of way. Keep us updated on how you are doing. I love watching new riders progress

Dear God, Please help me not to gag and tie up my children.


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GMEAN2055's Photo GMEAN2055 Posts: 1,900
2/4/10 7:12 P

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Bell: I am knew to biking also. I have only bike for a few months and do like going on paved paths. I am trying to get used to riding on the road, but I am scared to death. I like the idea you gave about taking the bike to the bike shop and have them explain it to me. I think I will do that this weekend. I have no clue about gears and I am learning that there are so many different kinds of bikes, seats and handle bars. Right now I have a comfort bike with fat tires. I would like to get into touring during the summer. I am afraid of the road bike with the skinny tires, they look fragile. But I will start at the bike shop to learn more. Thanks gail

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CAROLYN1ALASKA's Photo CAROLYN1ALASKA Posts: 10,845
2/2/10 2:08 A

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I'm really envious about your weather! You must be able to ride outdoors almost every day. I guess I could too, but when it's 10 degrees and all the roads are covered with thick ice it's not as appealing.
Everything that people said is good advice. Start on a trail or course that you can ride often until you get comfortable on that... then you can lengthen your work-outs or branch out.

“The only way to keep your health is to eat what you don't want, drink what you don't like, and do what you'd rather not.”
Mark Twain


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DRC2205's Photo DRC2205 Posts: 8,845
2/1/10 11:54 A

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I agree with what's been stated here. Take it easy and slow to start. The only thing I wouldn't do is invest too much in upgrading a $50 bike--I think you'l outgrow it pretty fast. Something like a water cage that you can move to a new bike is good--changin out gearing to something that costs twice as much as your frame...not so much!

So how have you been doing so far?

GMEAN2055's Photo GMEAN2055 Posts: 1,900
1/31/10 8:54 P

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Bell...: Thanks for all those pointers about biking. I am just getting into cyclying and do want to learn good habits to start with.

gail

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BLJORDAN's Photo BLJORDAN Posts: 58
1/31/10 7:50 P

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Welcome back to the world of bikes. As children we learned this was our first form of independence. Start of easy, cruise around residential or quiet streets. Once you start feeling comfortable, start having fun. Leaves and debris in the road, go around them. Doing this actually allows you to work on your balance and handling skills. When you get confident, ride down curbs, this also helps with balance and cordination.

Most important, look at where you want to go, not where you don't want to go. Trust me on this.

Last but not least, HAVE FUN!!!! For inspiration, go down to the Ironman and watch those cyclists, especially Christy Wellington, she is FAST!!!! World's Fastest to be exact.

Below I attached a video on some downhill mountain biking in France. They have been a bike for a while, enjoy.

http://www.world-vtt.com/video-mond ial-vtt-desce%20nte-venosc-camera-embarque
e-a218

Edited by: BLJORDAN at: 1/31/2010 (19:51)
BELLOYA's Photo BELLOYA SparkPoints: (2,968)
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1/26/10 12:18 A

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Your first day back on the bike go around the block. I know it sounds lame but your body is gonna be used differently in biking than running. It is a different part of your legs and you engage your abs a whole bunch if you have proper form. I would take small increments maybe starting at 5 miles one way so ten round trip. You may think this is a really easy goal but the number one problem beginners have is overestimating their stamina. I would not consider this a serious cardio exercise until you are use to your bike and comfortable riding on streets. It may seem like a great way to burn a ton of calories but unlike running you should be conducting yourself as a vehicle and obey all traffic laws and use signals. Trail riding or mountain biking does not usually require these things as much because you aren't usually on streets. DO NOT start with serious climbs. Until your knees are warm and ready to take the push you should hold off on long climbs. You can damage your dominant knee and seriously harm the tendons in the back of your leg. Your bike is gonna hurt like you would not believe after about ten miles. The seat is probably completely wrong for your body and cheap bikes are sooo heavy. But use what you have. Reward yourself with a higher quality bike after you complete a large goal. I started out on a wal mart bike and after a year up graded and then after two years upgraded again. My Kona is the best thing that ever happened to my ride.
okay here are my five rules of cycling that I require everyone on my team to follow:
1) Wear a helmet. I have been in bike accidents in which I would be brain dead without my helmet. It is like wearing a seat belt in a car but more important because that is the only thing between you and the road.

2) Take you bike to a bike shop and have them explain it to you. If your bike shop doesn't offer you information on how your gears work, how to pedal and when to get maintenance done then please let me know so that I can call them. Do not be afraid to switch out parts for a better quality.

3) Learn how to Check you tire pressure, grease your chain, and change a tire.

4) Carry a kit with you at all times that has a tire iron, a tool, a hand pump and a spare tube. Also ride with your ID and an In Case Of Emergency card.

5) HYDRATE. Figure on 16 oz of water per 20 miles. A bike store can add a hydration cage (water bottle holder) to your bike for a minimal fee. A hydration pack (camelback or cheaper version) is an excellent way to hydrate and doesn't require that you do some tricky movements to release your water bottle
Good luck and welcome to the Addiction!
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RESIPSA99's Photo RESIPSA99 Posts: 648
1/25/10 12:32 P

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Lucky you, living in Hawaii (I'm jealous...)!

I got back into biking about 5 years ago - hadn't been on a bike much since high school either, certainly not seriously.

I agree with 1Debie1 - ride or drive to find a short route that you're comfortable with (maybe without any big hills) and then you'll have one less thing to think about until you're more comfortable. I was just on Maui, and was really impressed with the bike lanes on the main highway - maybe there's one of those near you that you can do an out and back on.

For me, the big thing was the bike. Like you, I didn't spend much on the bike at first. I ended up buying a hybrid first and honestly, it really held me back (I switched it after about a year for a cyclocross and now I also have a road bike).

One thing I learned is that components make a BIG difference, and more importantly, remember that any bike shop can change your rear cassette and your front chain wheels to give you easier gears. They might try and convince you out of it, but stick to your guns as it really makes a difference, and doesn't cost all that much. I had them put a 3 ring system on the front and a mountain bike set on the back (usually has easier gears). At first, I was using the easiest gears a lot, but as I've progressed, I use mostly the harder gears. When I started out, I had no idea that this change was possible, and knowing that you have a gear that can get you up the hill no matter what is huge. And, also, remember that there's no shame in walking up, either - I had to do that a few times when I started!!

Bikes shorts are a definite, gloves (so that you don't scrape your hands up when/if you fall), bike/running glasses and a really comfortable helmet also made a big difference for me.

Good luck!

Edited by: RESIPSA99 at: 1/25/2010 (12:33)
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1DEBIE1's Photo 1DEBIE1 SparkPoints: (23,397)
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1/24/10 9:48 P

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For me, it took taking the same path, every single day. Then when I learned the path. I became braver and started going a little further, taking a different path, going the opposit way on the path.

At first I'd have to stop and catch my breath, shake out the legs, and unclench the toes. I found out the proper way to pedal and it helped to have a camelback filled with water to keep my hydrated and cool.
Fully-padded biking shorts allowed me not to have such a sore hinney and gave me the motivation to go a little further each time, ditto for biking gloves and you should already have a helmet!
Biking shoes were an aditional help for me, since I lack ankle support and regular tennis shoes hurt my feet.

KEEP IT UP and soon you'll find yourself saying, "I'm DOING IT!!!!

Good luck and may the wind softly touch you and the ride provide you renewed spirit!
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SUPERWOMAN2010's Photo SUPERWOMAN2010 Posts: 170
1/24/10 8:54 P

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Hey all... Total newbie here. Aside from the spin bikes I used in a handful of spin classes, I have not been on a "real" bike since I was in high school, and I am 33 years old!

But I really, really want to! I need to find something to do on my non-running and non-hiking days. I live in Hawaii, but in the hills... So the hills have me really freaked out! I bought a cheap 50 dollar bike (new) just to get me started, and that was 5 months ago... Have not been on it yet. Why am I so freaked out? Should I add training wheels? Kidding!

I could use any tips or advice to getting started. My favorite things about running are the wind in my face, the ocean all around me, and the trees waving in the wind... All things that are included with cycling!

Thanks!

Edited by: SUPERWOMAN2010 at: 1/24/2010 (20:54)
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