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SHORTYGETFIT's Photo SHORTYGETFIT Posts: 477
2/11/11 12:13 A

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Welcome ladies,

Sorry for the late reply to your post, but I have been MIA for a few days. One of the dowfalls to having Type 1, seems like there's always too much on the plate.

That's why it's important to have people like you two in our lives...a solid support system is one of our key survival tools.

I am new at the 'co-leader' title so please bare with me as I adjust. Also, please feel free to add me as a Spark friend. Hope to see you both around spark...posting and losing!

" Sometimes God places people in your life who help and encourage you even when they don't know it"


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FEISTYPATCHES's Photo FEISTYPATCHES SparkPoints: (3,521)
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1/22/11 12:10 A

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Hi Jaqilantern

It's good to hear I'm not the only one who joined the team to learn what living with Type 1 diabetes is like.

Your boyfriend is fortunate to have you caring and taking an interest to support him. We all need something/ someone to motivate us! I've only been a diabetes educator for 7 years; this has been the hardest thing to learn in my nursing career. Type 1 diabetes is so complicated to understand but once you do, it makes a little more sense why your blood sugars go up and down for no apparent reason.

Think Like a Pancreas is what really helped me understand it because it's written in a way that makes sense and with a sense of humor. I've read the medical textbooks and research papers which explain the physiology of it. But they don't explain what it's like to have diabetes and try to be in charge of "your disease". I bought a copy for my cousin after she almost passed out at a wedding last June, because she didn't know the importance of matching insulin to carbs. If I hadn't been sitting by her when everyone was dancing, and noticed that her "brain wasn't working right" (she couldn't answer a question she should have been able to) she would have been passed out soon. Part of her problem was that she was on too much insulin, was having frequent lows, so developed hypoglycemia unawareness. She didn't know what was wrong when her blood sugar was 43.

Now that she found an endocrinologist that has decreased her insulin she's starting to feel the lows when she's in the 50's. Hopefully that will get better. And she's learning to count carbs.

It was scary for me (and her) and made me realize how diabetes could have ruined a very happy occasion. It took over an hour to get her blood sugar from 43 to 125.

There's also another great book "Diabetes Burnout; what to do when you can't take it any more". I've worn insulin pumps with saline, checked my blood sugar, counted carbs, worn glucose sensors, pretended that I have diabetes as part of my education. After just a few days I can see how burnout could happen real fast. But like Gary Scheiner (Think Like a Pancreas) says "if you got it you might as well take care of it"

Thanks for the welcome to the team. We can be the "cheerleaders" as well as trying understand how we can help (and not be the "diabetes police")

FeistyPatches emoticon

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JAQILANTERN's Photo JAQILANTERN Posts: 300
1/21/11 2:40 P

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Hello! I also joined this team to learn more about what it's like to live with T1. My boyfriend has T1 and ignored it while he was in high school. He explained to me that he got tired of checking his bg and counting carbs, so he stopped checking and stopped going to the doctor. He decided he'd rather not worry about numbers and just skate and play sports with friends and eat badly. I met him after HS and became aware of his T1 when I decided I wanted to get healthy. He had no experience getting a hold of his numbers as an adult, so a low landed him in the hospital. (Followed by 2 more hypoglycemic seizures.) That drove me to want to learn as much about T1 as possible. We have both learned so much and are both much healthier and happier. Welcome to the team! It's wonderful that you're this dedicated to your patients. They are very lucky. emoticon

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FEISTYPATCHES's Photo FEISTYPATCHES SparkPoints: (3,521)
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1/20/11 10:08 P

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Hi

I joined this team to learn more about what it's like to live with type 1 diabetes. I am a RN, Certified Diabetes Educator, and work with people with type 1, insulin pumps and sensors every day. But I don't have diabetes. I'm hoping to learn from everyone on this team, so I can be a better coach for the people I work with every day.

If you haven't read this book yet, read Think Like a Pancreas by Gary Scheiner MS, CDE. I've learned SO much from it. Gary is an exercise physiologist as well as having type 1. He just started "type 1 university"--visit his website www.integrateddiabetes.com for more information.

I just joined sparkpeople January 8 2011 to help me get to a normal BMI and exercise regularly.

FeistyPatches

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