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TOPIC:   Tomatoes- Ay-yay-yay! 


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SLIMSHANN
SLIMSHANN's Photo Posts: 242
8/11/13 12:38 A

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Hi all. I am new to this forum but thought I would chime in with an agreement with sharjopaul with epsom salts... Epsom salts is magnesium sulphate. Magnesium will help the uptake of calcium. Sulphur will aid the uptake of nitrogen. My sister had some very pathetic looking roses, I suggested she sprinkle a tbsp on the soil and water it in. It really was amazing how happy they got in short time. Worth a shot. Just use moderation.

Experience is a hard teacher
because she gives the test first
and the lesson afterward;

Vernon Law (Major League pitcher)


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CBRINKLEY401
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8/5/13 6:18 P

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We're going to test it to see. The tomatoes are actually looking pretty good right now, so maybe part of the problem was just that the soil got compacted from all the spring rains. We keep trying to loosen it up around the plants and maybe that finally did the trick.

If it's to be, it's up to ME.

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GREBJACK
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8/3/13 8:18 A

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did you soil get out of balance while you were still feeding it lots of compost?


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CBRINKLEY401
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8/2/13 8:16 A

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I'm thinking of saving the eggshells, drying them, and then next year when I plant my tomatoes at the garden plots, adding the crushed shells to the bottom of each hole before I plant. That way I don't have to try to have enough for the whole section, but instead concentrate them where they are needed. I could also do the same with the compost - put a cup or two directly in each hole and mixing it with the dirt before setting in each plant. I've done that in the past, but lately haven't been doing so.

If it's to be, it's up to ME.

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WHITEANGEL4
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8/1/13 2:28 P

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These suggestions will help me with my patio garden

Keep on track


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SHARJOPAUL
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7/27/13 4:33 P

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You might see if neighbors will save eggshells for you. They don't have to be composted. just crush them and add to the soil.



CBRINKLEY401
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7/27/13 2:18 A

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I add those to my compost bin, but the finished compost goes on my home garden (and the tomatoes, peppers and eggplants do wonderful there). Not enough to take care of the garden plots that we rent from the park district, so will have to come up with other alternatives for those. We've been getting leaves from all our neighbors to add to the garden plots in the fall (and grass clippings during growing season), but we never can seem to collect enough to cover the whole area.
Don't know which nutrients are lacking at the plots, but the peppers, eggplants, and tomatoes just aren't growing well like they have in the past, so I'm going to test the soil to see what is lacking.

Edited by: CBRINKLEY401 at: 7/27/2013 (02:20)
If it's to be, it's up to ME.

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SHARJOPAUL
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7/26/13 11:33 A

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For long term, you can add crushed egg shells to the soil to increase calcium.



CBRINKLEY401
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7/25/13 8:31 P

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I never thought of using calcium supplements for my tomatoes. The ones at the garden plots just aren't doing well this year either. Last year was not enough rain, this year too much - at least in the spring - so planting was delayed. I had plenty of calcium citronate/magnesium tablets so we went ahead and tried it. Hope it works. For one reason or another we haven't harvested enough tomatoes to can, even with having lots of plants, for several years now. I freeze what I can and hope that the next year is better. Will definitely be adding some calcium to the soil in the fall as well as all the leaves we mulch in.

If it's to be, it's up to ME.

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LOUISEH54
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7/21/13 10:16 P

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I would start with one..you could always add more later. I'd hate to give you another problem to fix by adding too much to fast.



SHARJOPAUL
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7/21/13 4:47 P

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In addition to the calcium, you may want to add a little magnesium, a teaspoon of epsum salt per plant.



MICHTOTMAN
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7/21/13 2:50 P

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I did not use manure (just a lot of kitchen compost and dried leaves dug into the ground in the fall). Calcium is an interesting thought, though. I used to grind up eggshells in my compost but just didn't get around to it last year.

I've got some old calcium supplements... just one per plant???

The greatest glory in living lies not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.

NELSON MANDELA


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HOPEFULHIPPO
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7/21/13 2:01 P

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My tomatoes were doing great but I think they got so heavy they snapped themselves. Now i have all these "burnt" looking plants that I'm going to thin out today.

Corinna
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HOPEFULHIPPO
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7/21/13 2:00 P

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along the lines of calcium supplement, I was going to suggest putting milk on the base of the soil. works for my strawberries and pumpkins every time. (or coffee grounds if they like more acidic)

Corinna
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LOUISEH54
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7/21/13 12:07 P

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It sounds a little crazy but my sister had the same problem a few years ago. She pushed an outdated calcium supplement that she was taking for herself in the soil next to the plants and she couldn't believe the difference in them. That year her tomatoes had the strongest stems ever. Good luck!



HOUNDLOVER1
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7/21/13 12:06 P

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If you use manure for fertilizer it could be from the hay/pasture that the animals were fed. There a sprays (like Curtail) that pastures/hayfields are sprayed with that will not harm the animals but make soil infertile. You'll find lots of info if you google Curtail and similar herbicides.
I hope that's not it since it is hard to fix.
Birgit

You can talk to God all you want and that's great, but the changes happen when you start listening to him.

BE THE CHANGE YOU WANT TO SEE IN OTHERS.




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MICHTOTMAN
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7/21/13 9:48 A

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When I first started my organic garden over 10 years ago we used a lot of compost mixed in with our soil. I had tomatoes coming out my ears! For the past few years my tomatoes have been less prolific... and the past 2-3 years they were downright anemic- as was much of my garden I must say. I finally had my soil tested, discovered a nitrogen deficiency, and corrected it. (Last test, pre-plant time, soil was in the "perfect" zone for N-P-K and alkaline levels.)

So now I've got bean, potatoes, more beans, cucumbers, marigolds, tomatillos, basil and lettuce growing like mad.But my tomatoes? Not so much. They're no longer yellow - they're just sparse... skinny stems, not many leaves, some are quite short still - 24 inches is my smallest. Scrawny. They're flowering and some even have some early fruit, but they're so sad looking!

They're planted on the far east side of my garden with no shade until mid-day, when the crazy beans start giving them some dappled shade. Could this be it? I've googled it and found lack of sun and stress as 2 possibilities but neither really makes sense, especially when everything around them is doing so well... I could add some organic fertilizer, but I don't know if it's too late.

Thoughts?

The greatest glory in living lies not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.

NELSON MANDELA


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