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Gluten-Free and Healthy

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  FORUM:   Introduce Yourself to Team Forum
TOPIC:   I'm Melody 


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ELENASAN
ELENASAN's Photo Posts: 1,368
1/20/10 7:32 A

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Hi Melody!

I've just begun to experiment with other flours. And I've noticed in the last year, my main grocery store is stocking many more of them, and another new store in our area has them. Right now in my pantry I've got brown rice, tapioca and buckwheat flours and I've seen teff and a few others in the stores.

Try asking your local store to stock the ones you want.

Elena


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DJ4HEALTH
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1/20/10 12:20 A

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Publix has some coconut flour and other types of flour that do not contain wheat. You can also research it on the internet by putting in "Gluten free"

Edited by: DJ4HEALTH at: 1/20/2010 (00:22)
Dorothy





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TEXTRONICS
Posts: 7
1/19/10 7:48 P

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My husband bought a mix that was designed to make bread in a bread machine that had garbanzo bean and fava bean flowers. I hated it. The flavors were very strong and bitter. . . at least to me. I'm ready for my old favorites.

Melody emoticon



ILLINITEACHER52
Posts: 7,245
1/19/10 5:30 P

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Hi! I just bought a book about using almond flour, which I can find at my local supermarket in the health food section. I have also bought coconut flour and garbanzo bean flour but haven't used them for anything yet.


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NANCYLEE46
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1/19/10 6:48 A

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emoticon Melody,

Glad you joined us.

I agree with Louise about the use of internet for information. I also think sharing and learning what we know is vital.

Look forward to hearing more from you.

Nancy


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SWIMLOVER
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1/19/10 2:27 A

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The internet is a great source to find gluten-free foods and no wheat foods. Even if you don't have Cecliac, you might want to get a book about it or a book about going gluten-free and in the back of one usually is great references to Websites. Also, emoticon to this Team!
GOD BLESS!
Louise


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TEXTRONICS
Posts: 7
1/19/10 12:29 A

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I have severe IBS if I eat wheat as well as getting really nasty tempered. I can eat oats just fine, including Quaker, Barley, Rye (as long as there are no caraway seeds -- yuck), as well as rice, and other flowers. I personally like to mix oat and rye with barley, but have had a devil of a time finding barley flour. It just dawned on me that here I am on the internet and I have a deep freezer. I could order it. Hmm. Have to think about that. lol



TELLITFORWARD
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1/19/10 12:09 A

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I, too have wheat and not celiac issues. But it's easiest to just eat the GF way. As for where to get flour blends, it depends where you live. I get much of my stuff at the Vitamin Cottage, which has stores in a number of western states. Most natural food markets have them. I buy small amounts of things to try, and if I like them, then I often order from Amazon.
If you can eat spelt, that's the closest thing to wheat, but I'd keep that to a sometime thing. I find that if I eat too much of it, I get bothered. Also, I can eat most oats, but not Quaker. Life's funny, but I'll never go back to wheat again. It's been 7 months, and I'm losing my taste for it. Feeling better, losing weight, and having less pain is reason enough to keep on the straight and narrow.
Good luck. This is a super group of really neat people.
Kathy

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Antoine de Saint Exupery: The Little Prince


"To the world you may be one person, but to one person you may be the world."
Heather Cortez


TEXTRONICS
Posts: 7
1/18/10 11:37 P

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I don't have traditional Celiac disease in that I can eat gluten, but I cannot have wheat. That means that a lot of the foods I see in my "food plan" need to be altered. I need help to be sure I'm doing this right.

I did write a book many years ago on using alternative flours. Problem is now I'm having trouble finding them. Where do you locate alternates to wheat?



 
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