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AZULVIOLETA6's Photo AZULVIOLETA6 SparkPoints: (60,347)
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11/5/13 2:29 P

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I have primary hypothyroidism as well as Hashimoto's Disease. I have never been told to avoid gluten. I agree that eating a lower-carb diet can be helpful if you have a thyroid problem or any metabolic condition.

I really recommend seeing an endocrinologist if you think that you have issues. Generalists/family doctors/internists tend not to be very capable in dealing with metabolic issues. Seeing a specialist can make a huge difference.

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11/5/13 8:59 A

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A sight that might be helpful is Dr. Davis's. He has a book out on the negative health effects that wheat can have on many. I've seen that he has written about thyroid health on his sight. In particular you might take a look in the comment section on the two blog posts he has on this.

www.wheatbellyblog.com/category/thyroid-di
sease/


Outside of gluten, something else you might look at for improving thyroid health is protecting from electrical pollution. Ann Louise has had some nice write ups on this recently.

"The Newest Approach to Fix Your Thyroid"

www.annlouise.com/blog/2012/10/04/the-newe
st-approach-to-fix-your-thyroid/


MIAMI_LILLY's Photo MIAMI_LILLY SparkPoints: (100,026)
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11/4/13 2:06 P

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I have had hypothyroidism for 14 years now. I learned that having hypothyroidism could make you insulin resistepant, and there for limit your overall Carb intake. I find that if I limit my carbs to about 50 % of my total calorie intake, I keep my weight down easier than when I eat the recommended 65%. I've never been told to eliminate gluten.
I also found that I do better if I watch my soy intake as well. I still have some, but I make sure it is at least 6 hours after I take my thyroid medication.



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JUSTEATREALFOOD's Photo JUSTEATREALFOOD Posts: 1,284
11/4/13 7:31 A

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It may be that you'll have to do some experimentation with your diet for a bit to see if you have any improvements in your health. You could research it some more, possibly remove it from your diet for a trial period of say 3 months and get your thyroid levels checked.

One of my favourite podcasts here talking about the thyroid and adrenals.
undergroundwellness.com/podcasts/stop-the-
thyroid-madness/


I'm all about figuring out what works for you and your body. I was never diagnosed with coeliac but have had some major health improvements after eliminating gluten/grain from my diet. There is also some new evidence suggesting that gluten can cross the blood brain barrier and may contribute to Alzheimer's, dementia and other brain disorders. More research is needed.

www.drperlmutter.com/about/grain-brain-by-
david-perlmutter/


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HEALTHYJ29 SparkPoints: (3,246)
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11/4/13 4:29 A

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I don't have this but I have other medical problems that some feel better on gluten free even if they don't have an intolerance. They may be sensitive to it. I guess that in turn can cause inflammation in the body which makes medical conditions worse. I personally have not tried gluten free but I would assume it takes time to notice a benefit if any and also to adjust to that way of eating. Gluten is in items you may not even think of so you have to really read ingredients. Have you went on a forum for hypothyroidism and asked others about this?

MICHELLEXXXX SparkPoints: (6,908)
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11/4/13 1:54 A

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I would try lowcarb personally.

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-THENA-'s Photo -THENA- SparkPoints: (19,413)
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11/4/13 1:20 A

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I have autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's). The antibodies were found when I was 24, but my thyroid didn't actually begin to fail until I was 33--after the birth of my first child. I switched from my regular doctor to an endocrinologist at that point. I have never been sensitive to gluten and still am not. I have never been told to cut out gluten. Gluten does not cause or increase thyroid issues as far as I know, so there is no reason to stop eating it unless you have other issues with it.

It has, however, been recommended that I limit soy because it can inhibit my thyroid medication. But if it was something I wanted to eat regularly, I would just have to get my medication adjusted to compensate. Since I don't like it in most forms (except fermented soy sauce) I rarely eat it anyway, so it doesn't make any difference to me.

Edited by: -THENA- at: 11/4/2013 (01:25)
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11/4/13 1:14 A

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I have Hashimoto's, which is an auto-immune thyroid disorder, so I have done some research on this topic. Quite a lot has been written about the thyroid disease/gluten connection. The basic idea is that massive exposure to gluten triggers autoimmune disorders in some people, and these can manifest in different ways: skin problems like eczema, digestive problems like IBS or Crohn's, arthritis, and, yes, thyroid issues.

This is the best post I've found so far in summarizing the scientific claims being made about the connections between gluten and thyroid diseases:

http://autoimmunepatient.com/wordpress/2012/07/11/gluten-free-and-thyroid-disease/

Anecdotally, a friend of mine with Hashimoto's went gluten free and reports that her thyroid function improved (shown in bloodwork her doctor had ordered) and she was able to decrease her dose of Synthroid. She said she felt much better, too. I am gluten free but haven't noticed much of a difference myself.

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11/3/13 11:51 P



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There's some evidence that low-carb diets work slightly better for hypothyroid, but I've never heard anyone make that claim for gluten-free (unless it was part of a claim that gluten is the root of all evil.)

Gluten is a protein. When someone's allergic to something, they're usually actually allergic to a protein in it. If you're allergic or sensitive to gluten, you'll usually have tummy issues from it. If your gastro-intestinal system works fine, then gluten probably is a problem for you.

The main advantage of going gluten-free would be that it eliminates so many foods that you end up eating a lot less overall. It's much easier to say (to yourself or others) "I can't eat that donut because it might have gluten" than it is to say, "I'm not going to eat that donut because it's not good for me."



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SELENITYLUNARE's Photo SELENITYLUNARE SparkPoints: (16,509)
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11/3/13 11:00 P

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I have been told before that my thyroid levels are normal. However, I have also been told by many that the TSH test is not accurate enough and that I need to have my free T3 ad T4 levels evaluated. I have nearly every symptom of hypothyroidism and will be attempting to get my Dr to test me for this.

But before she finally works me in (which will probably be like 3 months) I was wondering if anybody with hypothyroidism has been told to go on a gluten-free diet. Or if you have went on it yourself.

What were your results? Did you start feeling better afterwards? How hard was it for you to cut out gluten?

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