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KNITTER11
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10/13/13 9:12 A

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I cant keep chips or candy in my house either-i'll binge until it's gone. I don't have children though, so it's only impacting myself. I'm trying to incorporate healthier options-apple with pb, carrots with a dip made from greek yogurt. Then when i'm really craving, I'm trying to only buy one serving instead of the whole box. I know that a giant bag of chips is more cost effective than buying that single serving, but it's better for my personal bottom line, if not my financial one.



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DELLA81156
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10/13/13 7:41 A

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Instead of dieting you need to work on healthy living and eating a treat once in awhille is important to healthy living..... emoticon

Della .


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FIRESTARINFINI
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10/12/13 2:15 P

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Don't ban them from the house but integrate them into your cheat days.

I know people don't like the concept of cheat days but it really helps me to stay on top of things six days a week.

It creates an incentive to stay healthy and since it's not a lifetime ban your family doesn't need to feel deprived.

Plus, if you keep it up at some point you and your family will feel pretty sick after your cheat days because you've been eating healthy for so long.



Finish each day and be done with it. You have done what you could; some blunders and absurdities have crept in; forget them as soon as you can. Tomorrow is a new day; you shall begin it serenely and with too high a spirit to be encumbered with your old nonsense.

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STUTLERTONI
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10/10/13 1:06 P

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All we had in my house growing up was junk food. I don't even think I drank my first glass of water until I was 21. It was Coke, Kool-aid and Sweet Tea. After school snack, bed time snack. It helped me develop horrendous food habits. I was a very tall and skinny kid growing up. Now I'm fat. I believe that you would actually be doing you kids a favor in limiting their access to sweets. This is one of those "It hurts me more than it hurts you" moments of parenting, I think. But along with removing the sweets open a dialogue with our kids about healthy eating and moderation.

"When are ya gonna get this, B? Life for a Slayer is very simple: want... take... have."

-Faith


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DANAEBOYCE1
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10/10/13 11:03 A

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I would also like to add that for people who have kids in school, you might be offering healthy things at home, but at school they can have free range. especially the older ones. My sister is thin and her fiancee and 2 of her kids are in great shape. She and her fiancee teach yoga and they all do mixed martial arts. She is all obsessed with organic food, and only provides healthy options. They dont even have a microwave. BUT one of her kids is 14 and 205 pounds. I think hes about 5'8". He eats me out of house and home when he comes, he stays up late eating, and at school, he can go off campus and get whatever he wants; and frankly, the food AT the schools are even worse half the time. I like to make my son cold lunch because I am shocked at what they are feeding the kids in the schools. Chocolate milk is offered every day. The salad is pre-coated with ranch, and I am almost positive that the cook doesnt actually cook anything. Even the veggies are pre-packaged. When I was a kid, they actually cooked everything. Still, the food could have been healthier, but geez! And we think that it is depriving our kids if we only provide healthy options instead of the stuff we were never meant to eat, its just a common thought, its no wonder childhood obesity is so high. And at my sons school, they are only allowed to play outside for a total of about 30 min throughout the day, maybe 40 min. Its really sad that they sit all day, eat junk, and people are still wondering why there are so many issues. Why cant they sit still? Maybe because humans arent meant to sit on our asses all day! Anyway, I guess all I am trying to say is the options are everywhere and I think the best thing we can do is educate our kids on what good choices are and why they are important so that they make good choices no matter where they are.

Thinking happy thoughts


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DANAEBOYCE1
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10/9/13 11:37 P

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I am obese and my kids arent overweight. I dont keep stuff like that in the house but they do get the occasional treat at the restaurant or some gum. I teach them that their bodies dont need that. my son does great on his own and around friends, but my daughter always wants treats. Youll find what works with your family. You have to remember that you arent depriving them of sweets, you are depriving them of being fat, insecure, and unhealthy. thats a good thing.

Thinking happy thoughts


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FRANCESLUCAS
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10/9/13 1:26 P

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I am a little late chiming in and haven't read everyone's reply but there are healthy alternatives that you and your children can enjoy. They don't need the bad foods and you are not depriving them, you are helping them when you allow them to grow up eating healthy foods. I wish I would have been smart enough to do that my my children when they were younger. The best thing you can do is feed them healthy foods now. You will be glad you did later! And so will they!

Today is the best day to begin making changes for yourself and others both inside and out!

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DAWNDMOORE40
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10/9/13 11:51 A

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We try to be very conscious of what we buy at the store because our family tries to eat healthy. We have been struggling for years with my 14 year old Son whose eating is out of control. We provide healthy food in our house, but the problem is he is eating mass quantities of the healthy stuff! He does it when he is alone in the house or while we are sleeping! He is only 14 and he weighs 202 lbs. He is only 5"5. WE have been given many suggestions on how to help him. We were told by the counselor that if we lock up the food that then he will feel like he has to sneak it. WE are never sure which way to go.

"When you get to a plateau, think of it as a landing on the stairway to your goal. And maintenance is a lifelong plateau, so a bit of "rehearsal" for maintenance isn't the worst thing in the world.

"Your past does not equal, nor does it dictate, your future.


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KITTYCAT64
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10/9/13 9:32 A

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My daughter is a nurse, and very health conscious, although as he has weight issues. Her motto is, "If it isn't in your home then you can't eat it." I try to live by that now. In so doing, I buy meat and veggies, fruit sometimes graham crackers. Almond milk and cold as nd hot cereals.




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SHAKESALOT
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10/8/13 8:41 A

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Making it real!


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SUNSET09
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10/8/13 12:28 A

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DESIDERATA~GIRL emoticon ! Because of health problems, we were raised on fruits, veggies, treated with Diet sodas and an occasional trip downtown for popcorn and limited pecan clusters, my Dad's favorite. They provided fruits and veggies cut up in the frig for us to consume at any time we wanted to. We ate no fast foods nor where there snacks in the house. We ate wheat bread, a lot of fish, fowl and a lot of steaks, (probably one think I don't miss)! I have given up red meat and pork and so thankful to my parents for loving me enough to do the right thing for us as I still carry those healthy eating habits as my daughter does as well.



 
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ELSELTZ
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10/7/13 6:02 P

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I am intrigued by the idea that you are "punishing"your children by only providing healthy food.

Do you feel you are "punishing" yourself by making healthier choices? Do you feel that your lifestyle choices are some kind of "penance" for having overindulged in the past, and since your kids are not fat, they don't "deserve" that penance?

Do you feel that sweets and processed foods demonstrate love and affection in some way? Or that unrestricted eating is a form of fun or entertainment that benefits your kids' development?

I would encourage you to examine these thoughts and feelings as they apply to your own health journey. It will be harder for you to stay consistent with healthy choices if you harbor negative feelings toward them, or feel resentful about being "deprived".

Love your kids the way you love yourself, and vice versa.



TORTORAR
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10/7/13 6:01 P

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I love ice cream and my whole house (daughter me and husband) would all devour junk food if it is in the house. And my husband is insanely fit (like 8% body fat fit). So, sometimes we have pretzels, always air pop popcorn, and really don't keep a lot of other snacks.

I would admittedly mostly eat it.

My daughter misses the junk food sometimes from before I got married and lived with my parents. But we are all healthier. Now, we go out for ice cream as a treat! It's nice to be able to enjoy these things in moderation as a family. or if we go out to eat we don't have restrictions as 95% of the time our diet is great!

Don't feel guilty! You're teaching them great habits.



CZERBE78
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10/7/13 3:43 P

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Wow, this topic stirs up a lot of emotion!
I grew up in two seperate homes. My mom had me on diets from the time I was 8, and was always very critical of my weight. There was hardly anything to eat in her home, that wasn't rice cakes, melba toast, and Tab. Very rarely was there junk. I would go to friends houses and go crazy eating. My realtionship with food was very unhealthy. I was using anorexia and bulimia as tools to get thinner.
I went to live with my Dad in my early teens. There was always things to snack on at his house. But their whole attitude about food was much healthier. There was always fresh fruit and they encouraged lots of physical activity. I learned there that healthy eating did not mean deprivation, or eating flavourless rice cakes.
I have not done the best as an adult in using these lessons and my weight shows that. as for my children, I am trying to show them a better way.

Always do your best. What you plant now, you will harvest later.
-Og Mandino
Climb the mountains and get their good tidings. Nature's peace will flow into you as the sunshine into the trees. The winds will blow their freshness into you, and the storms their energy, while cares will drop off like autumn leaves.
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KDYLOSE
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10/7/13 10:09 A

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I totally agree with treating these foods as special treats that you sometimes buy in small portions outside the house. Modeling moderation for your kids is a lifetime gift.





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HAWTGRANNY2014
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10/7/13 12:52 A

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Personally I think you are training them not to be junk food junkies. Have you seen all the overweight children in America. It is sad. I have seen kids throw tantrums in stores and their parents grab candy to satisfy them. what is that teaching them? I think if parents taught their kids good eating habits they might grow up to know what to eat and be much healthier,.



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CALLMECARRIE
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10/5/13 2:40 P

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I think your concern that deprivation will create junk food bingers out of your kids is not totally without merit. My mom didn't have cookies and candy and chips in the house, and I way overate on that stuff whenever I got the chance. However, she also didn't have fruits and vegetables and healthy treats around. She had problems with depression and would stay in bed for days, and us kids would eat dry spaghetti, Tang, old bread -- whatever we could reach. Then she'd perk up and go buy a gallon of ice cream and we'd all eat the whole thing in thirty minutes.

My point is, the absence of junk food isn't abuse or neglect. The absence of FOOD is. If you're a reasonably happy, functioning family and you set a good example and teach your kids good eating habits, you really can't go wrong. If your kids don't have cookies around, they'll eat the oranges and apples you cut up for them, or something like that. It's a good thing. They'll learn to love fresh foods and you'll get rid of the temptation to eat the junk.

Edited by: CALLMECARRIE at: 10/5/2013 (14:42)
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GRIZ1GIRL
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10/5/13 12:13 P

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Kids do tend to "go crazy" when they have strict diets at home--they find friends who have junk food & go nuts. :) But that doesn't mean they're setting themselves up for a lifetime of fat. It just means they're kids!

You can totally make "healthier" junk food for your kids...so they're happy & you're happy. Homemade cookies can be made with applesauce & oatmeal & have added nuts & fruits that make them healthier than a boughten granola bar.

And we LOVE all the "baked" chips & Sun Chips--we just limit the portion sizes in our house. My daughter LOVES when I fix her a salad--it's her favorite snack. And that's no thanks to me--I've never forced it on her--it's HER choice!

If you give kids lots of options, a lot of the time THEY choose the healthy ones! And if they graze on cupcakes at school parties, or eat a bag of Doritos at a friend's house after school...that's ok too. Life isn't black or white--there are lots of shades of gray.

It Is What It Is.... :)


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GRAYLADY13
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10/4/13 11:14 P

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Many great suggestions here. I would suggest teaching about nutrition labels, calories, and healthy choices. Make a weekly menu plan and share with family. Have two choices for snacks after school like an apple or popcorn, or an orange or trail mix, etc. That way your children get to choose and with variety they won't miss unhealthy snacks.

Also another idea is to make a chart for each child where they paste, color, or pin sections for veggies, fruit, meat, dairy, grains etc so they have a visual of their choices.

Making homemade popsicles, trail mix, or ants on a log (celery with peanut butter and raisins on top) or flavored popcorn with the children mixing and doing may spark a lot of fun.

Happiness grows inside me.


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MARGARITTM
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10/4/13 4:52 P

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Involve your kids in preparing fun and interesting foods.


Ok to go out for an ice cream once in awhile but having it in the house ....not so much!

Don't forget the activity factor - you/they can consume a lot more claories when they are active



MOJOSOUND
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10/4/13 3:06 P

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I am the only one in the house on a diet but I also do the grocery shopping. My wife and 2 boys live with what I bring home. I will bring home treats for them occasionally but it is not the norm. It works out for us and they know that I need to keep my blood sugars in line or I will be in trouble. They love me enough to put up with me. :)



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EJB2801
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10/4/13 2:16 P

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Moderation is usually the key. With food allergies, such as in our home, one cannot always accomplish this. I can say that my son feels quite wistful about his restrictions, yet there is not really a choice. Because of this, we do make it a point to purchase some out and out safe goodies for him that are convenient for outings and times where he is in a group that will be eating. These are not always the highest in nutritional value, but they serve the purpose of not having to pull out another bag of carrots whilst your friends chow down on anything and everything. Believe it or not, he has had peers comment on the oddness of his food. Sigh.

My older child is quite overweight despite our being food faddies during her early days. There are always many sides to weight issues. I am proud of my daughter for now taking charge of healthy changes on her own, yet she never was a junk food junkie to begin with. Eating well has more benefits than weight control (which is slowly beginning to happen for her). It is great when we pull together but counterproductive when we nag, I would say.

Those portion controlled snacks that you can pop into the lunches and so forth are great because there is never a remaining morsel that suddenly finds its way into one's mouth.

Do you know about the Eat Up & Slim Down team, yet? Might be some other ideas on there.



SHEL_V2
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10/3/13 6:09 P

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Even when I wasn't actively working to lose weight, my son knew that Cheez-Its were dangerous. Why? Because Mommy might eat the whole box, and that would feel really bad. Wheat Thins were fine because I'd only eat them if I was hungry.

Through my son's normal kid ups and downs about what he likes to eat, I'm always looking for things that he likes that I can leave alone. Currently this includes one flavor of one type of yogurt (that ironically, is low fat and artificially sweetened), wrapped lunch box-type snacks like cheese crackers with peanut butter, and lunchables.

Things we both eat include egg salad and sugar-free Fudgicles.

He gets this stuff in his packed lunch, when I have little control over what he eats anyway. I give him his choice of school meals, but he only wants a few a month. When we sit down for breakfast and dinner (every day), the choices are more in line with what Dad and I eat.



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BELDAME
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10/2/13 4:21 P

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Want a fat kid's perspective?
Have some snacks in the house. When they are around other kids who are eating crap, let them have some crap, too.
I went on my first diet in 1977; I was six. I was pudgy all through grade school anyway. While the other kids had sandwiches, chips, and Ho Ho's in their lunchboxes, I had soup and carrot sticks and those little cheese "kisses" they used to sell. One day in second grade I forgot my lunch and got to eat half of some other kid's sandwich and a butterscotch Crimpet, and I thought I'd died and gone to heaven.
My normal weight but perpetually-dieting mom did not keep candy, cake or cookies, in the house, although she would sometimes buy some kind of junk food treat on paydays. No fast food, and when we went out to eat, I got the diet plate. (Hamburger patty, cottage cheese, half a canned peach, lettuce. Sometimes now I get intense cravings for one of these, but not even the diners serve them anymore.)
I wasn't allowed to trick or treat, and I don't remember attending birthday parties.
I was almost always hungry. Thirsty, too, since I was a bed-wetter and had my fluids cut off around 5 o'clock. Whenever I had the opportunity, away from home, I ate as much junk as I could get my hands on.
I was thin in high school because I starved myself - it's the only way I have ever been able to attain the weight the BMI chart says I should be. Here's what I ate: Diet Coke, Dexatrim, Centrum vitamins, Lance crackers, Minute Rice, and Lean Cuisines, deviating from this only for Christmas and Easter dinner, and Thrasher's Fries at the beach. (Anyone else miss those beautiful little red-and-yellow Dexatrim capsules? I think I'd sell my soul for a box of those.)
Then at some point, probably in college, I decided I was sick and damned tired of denying myself everything, and rather than just allowing small things in moderatiion, I ate anything and everything I'd never been allowed, or allowed myself, to eat.
I porked out, of course, but BOY did I have a good time.
I lost a great deal of weight on weightwatchers, and am now counting calories to ensure the correct calorie deficits (because WW changed their program and it SUCKS now - I followed the changed plan and didn't lose an OUNCE.)
My advice: let your kids have tasty food they enjoy in moderation, making sure they're getting adequate nutrition and enough physical activity. Buy stuff that they like, but you don't, so that you won't be tempted by it.
You can sit around and smugly decree that you won't allow your children "poison", or whatever, but I can tell you with some authority that as soon as they're away from you, they will stuff their little faces until they are sick with all the things you don't allow them to have.

"Contrariwise," continued Tweedldee, "if it was so it might be; and if it were so, it would be; but as it isn't, it ain't. That's logic."


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CAH-RD
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10/2/13 8:20 A

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Without having read any of the other responses, here is mine.

It seems silly to me that people think cookies, candy, cake, etc is "normal" to have around and that they SHOULD have it. Why?

In our home we do not keep this stuff. Although my husband and I maintain a healthy weight, we know that we cannot keep sweets and salty snacks around without indulging more than we should, so we don't. I have a 2 year old daughter who finds MORE than her fair share of treats. We talk about this often and she knows that treats ares something we have on *occasion.* We have treats at grandma's house or when we're camping or maybe if we dine out (which only happens a time or two a year). Those are times for treats. Kids do NOT need treats on a daily basis to be "normal."

I do not think all out restriction is key for them becuase yes, THEN they may over-indulge when they get the chance to, but surely not keeping them in the house is going to limit them all that much. You will find that the "treat opportunities" come up more than you think. My daughter, at 2, is very well-rounded in terms of the foods she likes. She will pretty much eat anything and everything. She does enjoy her treats, but she also does not fight us or throw fits when we say no because she just knows how it is.

Edit: And I question WHY one would allow their child to have something they aren't allowing themselves to have? If you know it's unhealty for you, then it MUST be unhealthy for your child as well. Why poison them all the while you are trying to clean up your act? It doesn't make sense to me. Sure they aren't overweight NOW, but keeping them living a lifestyle as you are WILL lead to obesity.

Edited by: CAH-RD at: 10/2/2013 (08:22)

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JAMIRBLAZE
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10/1/13 1:02 P

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My parents are both unhealthy eaters and not terribly active outside of their jobs. Cake, cookies, candy, chips, etc. were a mainstay of my parents' home when I was growing up. (They are marginally better now.) This is part of why I was 100 lbs overweight by the end of high school - I never had any real experience with eating healthy or healthy portion sizes or any incentive to be active. It's taken 10 years of living mostly on my own to take off that 100 lbs and to develop good habits.

I don't blame my parents for my weight, but I wish that I had grown up in a more health conscious household (especially as they have their own health issues now, including being overweight).



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IAMLOVEDBYYOU
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10/1/13 12:04 P

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Think of it this way. You're heading out somewhere, and your 3 year old is throwing a fit and DOES NOT want to be strapped into his carseat. He's screaming and crying and yelling and overall throwing a tantrum.

What do you do? Do you let him out of the carseat so he can move around the car and have more fun? Do you let him sit on the seat so he can jump up and down while the car is moving? So he can stick his head out the window? Boy, all of those things sound MUCH better than sitting in a carseat.

But you don't do that. You strap him in, even if he keeps screaming. You insist that it is best that he sit in his carseat. You wouldn't even QUESTION it. You wouldn't think twice.

Why can't parents do the same thing with healthy? It is for the health and safety of your children. It is arguably MORE dangerous to be both overweight and unhealthy than it is to ride in a car without a carseat. You know best, Mama. Go for it.

It's against the cultural trends, but carseats were also once a new thing, a fad, or for "paranoid parents." Now, in my city, children are required to be in a booster seat until they are 8 years old (or 80 pounds).



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G33K10V3
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10/1/13 5:13 A

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Your kids will be fine, don't think you are giving them the shaft by not keeping junk food around, you are helping them now and you are helping the future them. Setting a good example for my 12 year old daughter is part of what got me started really trying to manage my weight. If it is really hard for you eliminating the junk, I would explain to them what you are doing and WHY and explain that you are not trying to punish them but you are doing something so you can LIVE :D Your kids love you and they will understand and they will support you.
If you really want them to have their goodies then let them have a small stash in their room or something, like once a week maybe give them a few things to have and tell them to keep it away from you.


"Ordinary people believe only in the possible.
Extraordinary people visualize not what is possible or probable,
but rather what is impossible. And by visualizing the impossible,
they begin to see it as possible."
~Cherie Carter-Scott~


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GENRE009
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9/30/13 1:39 P

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I either go for healthier snacks, like natural ones, like fruit, or fig cookies .Or I sneak in healthier alternatives into the snacks. So when I make brownies I add vegetables, yogurt, applesauce, flax, ect.. If the kids are older I suggest hummus with vegetables or toasted pita.

Edited by: GENRE009 at: 9/30/2013 (13:42)


ERICAANN75
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9/29/13 5:59 P

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Here is how I handle this issue in my house. I put junk food in the house they enjoy but that I won't binge on. I do try not to keep the foods they will binge on either. I can let a chocolate cake mold on the counter but my hubby and son could eat a whole cake in one sitting. So chocolate cake only enters our house on their birthdays. I keep chips and chocolate chip cookies out of the house. I binge on those. So in a nut shell my pantry and freezer have a few indulgences.... a few small bags of individually packaged chips (kinds I won't pig out on), some non chocolate flavored cookies, some vanilla ice cream, pudding, etc. all things I can enjoy, but don't loose control over. On another note kids learn from their parents and will shadow the good and the bad habits even those things you don't think they see.... they see, they know and in time it will manifest itself in their lives. The most surprising thing for me to learn this summer is that I am more like my dad then I ever thought possible. My parents divorced when I was 8. The following 30 years I would rarely see him until this past summer for 8 weeks....I woke up he was around... I went to bed... he was there to say good night to. At the age of 38, I realized that all the things I love about myself I got from my dad, but all the things I want to change I got from him too.... bitter sweet pill...but powerful in my mind as a teacher, wife and mother about the influence parents have in the lives of their children.



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EGRAMMY
EGRAMMY's Photo Posts: 12,828
9/29/13 2:35 P

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keep on keeping on...



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CARRIELYN56
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9/29/13 6:37 A

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Very nicely put. Thank you.

...one step at a time....


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GLSGIRL64
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9/27/13 8:05 P

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Yes, the parents can set an example about food and eating for their children, but the issue is often far more complex. Having worked with children for many years, this will work up to a point.
You arm them with sensible choices and then they step into the world and have to make their own decisions once they mingle with their peers. The idea is not to "demonize" particular foods, which then makes them more attractive. I have a vivid memory of a student who would always be begging for snacks from others because her mother would never allow that stuff into her house!

Other factors come into play also: body type, appetite, food preferences. I have three adult children who deal with food in radically different ways. For example my daughter is slender and petite and will always be that way because she has a small appetite ( unlike me who has a different relationship with food ). We joke that she inherited my mother's skinny genes
instead of me who got my father's more roly-poly ones.

The good thing is these young adults all realize that food choices definitely affect their lives. My daughter is a vegetarian. Both sons are conscious of what they eat and how their choices affect how they feel. Did I preach to them? No. Like my mother, I tried to show them what good food was all about.

There is Life After Work.


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CHRISTASP
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9/27/13 11:54 A

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I think that children follow the example of what their parents DO not what they say, you know?

I think first of all you yourself must be at peace with not having sweets or limiting their use. You use the words 'deprived' and 'punished' - could that be how YOU really feel about not having sweets? I think that if that's so, it's important to try to gain an new perspective: namely that you don't need sweets, you won't crave them if you don't have them, and you're doing yourself a huge favor not eating that stuff. This will help your own efforts to be more healthy and lose weight!

I also think that you shouldn't make it about the kids. If YOU don't want sugar in the house, don't have it in the house, or only on truly special days for the kids. You're not depriving or punishing them. But let it be about yourself and what you want not about their health.

Because if you should tell them this is for their good, and then not manage to maintain your healthy habits and bring the sweets into the house again, what message is that to the children? Suddenly you don't care about their wellbeing any more? So I think it's important to just tell them YOU need to do without the stuff. IMHO.

Edited by: CHRISTASP at: 9/27/2013 (11:56)
Christina





SHAKESALOT
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9/27/13 8:46 A

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walk extra on day want special food

Making it real!


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ONESPOTLEFT
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9/27/13 6:30 A

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it is difficult to pass by a cake, cookie, or donut I don't want. But these days I perfer, berries, celery, carrots, peppers and once in awhild yogurt.

I always thought yogurt was healthy but you have to watch what kind you get

"Those who judge do not matter; those who matter do not judge" Aviva Nubel

Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.
--Winston Churchill







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NENATO2
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9/26/13 10:44 A

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When I started on this track 6 years ago, I decided to eat healthy, cook healthy and shop healthy. I found that my husband loves all of our healthy meals and he never goes hungry. I raised my kids with junk food in the house. And it really is junk. Looking back I can't believe that I kept that stuff in my home when we were raising kids. Thankfully, I also raised them that they would always have to watch their way. Genetics are just stacked against them. Today, the daughter is 38 and healthy slim and the son is 30 and in good health. I also never made them even taste something they didn't want to try based on some horrible experiences I had as a child. They both prefer healthy foods. Yes, they splurge on the unhealthy food every now and then. But they really like the good (healthy) stuff!

Look at it this way. You are taking care of your health by not having the junk around. Let them get unhealthy with the garbage once they are grown and you won't feel guilty about that! I can almost guarantee you that they will prefer the healthy food when they are adults.

People who talk about being bored - are boring.

There's a brighter day coming...


IH8W82
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9/26/13 3:58 A

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I was shocked when I read, " I feel guilt about not having the snacks that my kids like in the house". Feeling guilt should be felt if you give you children unhealthy, empty calories. Giving them a peach or plum should not be guilt, but pride. I am now 65 yrs old and still fighting the fat. I'm over 300 lbs. I promised myself when my first child was born that, "my kids would have healthy meals and snacks." My daughter, at age two, could be asked if she wanted a cookie or a peach and she always answered that she wanted a peach. This really messed with my mind. How could anyone, especially a child, choose a fruit over a cookie. My kids are all healthy and thin. My older son (42) sometimes fights the yo-yo syndrome. My daughter (34) has always be extremely thin. after 3 kids, she was still wearing like size 3 jeans. Today, she is constantly buying a size smaller. Damn girl, doncha know that when you are stressed, you should gain, not lose weight. My 32 year old son is also thin. My husband is also obese and thinking about weight loss surgery, so we can't assume that they are thin because of their dad's genes. So, back to you problem, start early to introduce you children to proper eating habits and they won't have the stress of breaking bad habits. I wish my parents had known what we know, but back in the day . . . .
Good luck my friend. I hope you find the solution that works for you and your family.
Kathryn

The person who makes a success of living is the one who see his goal steadily and aims for it unswervingly. That is dedication.
Cecil B. DeMille

Aim for success, not perfection. Never give up your right to be wrong, because then you will lose the ability to learn new things and move forward with your life.
Dr. David M. Burns



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SUNSET09
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9/26/13 2:30 A

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My Mom and Dad would cut up fruit and veggies and leave them in the frig for us to eat at our leisure. They did not allow any other foods in the house like chips, sugar or fast foods. I recently saw a commercial in which a Mom had her children help her with cutting up strawberries and made a strawberry sundae with low fat whipped cream and layered it with the strawberries. Although it may have been "good", they didn't know how healthy it was as well. They learn from what we do! emoticon emoticon emoticon emoticon

Edited by: SUNSET09 at: 9/26/2013 (02:32)

 
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PURPLEBIRD63
PURPLEBIRD63's Photo Posts: 1,445
9/25/13 12:22 P

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If my kids were that young again... and I knew then what I know now... I'd do it over differently...
and I would not have that junk food (cookies and chips) in the house except for special occasions, or maybe wknds, or parties, etc...




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BAPSANN
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9/25/13 8:16 A

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I am working on keeping all snacks out of the home so that I will only eat a healthy meal, I will keep fruit in the house as snacks.

All things are possible if you only believe, even losing 15 pounds


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NJSHAR
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9/24/13 10:55 P

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I have kids, too. I don't think chips or cookies are bad in moderation. But, I understand your perspective. I just buy the ones I don't like. I hate chewy cookies, so I buy a package of chewy cookies - they have 1 cookie each before bed with their milk.

I buy whole grain crackers - my older daughter loves cheese & crackers as a snack or even as a light meal, with some fruit. I love Ritz crackers, so I buy plain old wheat Saltines, instead.

There are other examples, but I actually have a cabinet just for my kids with lunchbox fillings like applesauce, pudding, crackers, cookies, etc.

If you still can't handle having stuff in the box, then I'd buy the single-serve packages for the kids. It's a physical barrier between you and the food, plus it's also portion controlled. It's more expensive, but, hey, we're all on Spark, diverting money from Jennie Craig, so it's all good!

Good luck!

"Most of our obstacles would melt away if, instead of cowering before them, we should make up our minds to walk boldly through them."
-- Orison Swett Marden


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GENRE009
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9/24/13 5:04 P

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When I grew up we had no sweets in the house! it was months before my mom would take us out and allow us to buy a bag full of candy. Back then it only cost a few pennies. We ate everything at once. I think it was because we weren't used to having it around. This carried on to the holidays too. And to this day, if it's in the house, it calls to me like a poison. When the mood hits me, I will eat sweets till I am sick. So, I keep it out of the house. I think it has a toxic affect on me, and makes me feel like an addict.



PINKPONY70
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9/24/13 3:43 P

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I wbrought up without sweets in the house. I enjoyed fruits, nuts, and other healthy snacks. Personally I think parents that keep too much junk in the house are the ones who should feel guilty. SInce I've bee married and my husband likes sugery snacks is when I put all of my weight on. Not blaming him of course but as you said the temptation is there. We used to get our favorite sweet cereal for our birthday so it was even more of a treat but on a weekly basis we ate healthy snacks



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ROS3MARY
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9/23/13 9:55 P

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Your kids will take your lead about how to feel about the new food choices. If you feel like eating health is a punishment, they will too. Most of us have a sweet or salty tooth, but as we become accustomed to the new choices, your kids will find things about them to enjoy, too. We have to get past the emotions that control our eating.

May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace as you trust in him, so that you will overflow with hope ... Rom 15:13


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BLUETABBY
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9/22/13 10:16 P

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Answering: "How many of us on this site were thin children?"

I was quite thin as a child and also into adulthood. I only stopped being thin after I turned 40 and got married in the same year. I had never had to watch what I ate before then; as a child, I ate whatever was in the house and never had to worry about it. Then I had to learn new habits in middle age, when I couldn't eat like I used to and still get away with it.

Edited by: BLUETABBY at: 9/22/2013 (22:20)
"I can do all things through him who strengthens me." Phil 4:13, ESV

"What the space program needs are more English majors." -- Michael Collins, Gemini 10/Apollo 11

"Make time for yarn every day." -- motto, Knitting Daily (PBS)

ESV Bible Online www.esvonline.org/Genesis+1/


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CAROLRCL
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9/22/13 9:42 P

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It is definitely important to keep your house full of the healthy food and a safe eating environment for you and your husband. It will be good for your children, also, to grow up with "normal" being primarily healthy food. But you are right that there will be circumstances outside the home where they will have access to junk, and that is OK. My biggest advice to you would be, even as you intentionally leave certain types of food out of your house, NEVER, especially to your children, vilify any food as "bad." It's not the food that is bad, it is just not something to eat all the time. They are fine for sometimes. You can even have special treats as a family, something that you buy SOMETIMES and eat, and when it is gone you don't buy more just to keep it on hand. It is important in developing a healthy relationship with food that children are taught that it is OK to enjoy things, even if they aren't the healthiest, just in it's proper place and time and amount. This will go further toward helping them avoid binging than anything else. When you know they are going to a party or somewhere there will be lots of food, talk to them about what they will face, remind them that, yes, it's yummy, and that's OK. It's OK to have SOME, but they don't have to eat ALL of it just because it is there. Help them feel strong and empowered, that food is a tool and a pleasure, not a master or a sin.



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MSRETIRED60
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9/22/13 12:27 P

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I was always a healthy weight, ate good foods and took care of myself, but started gaining weight, 40 pounds the first year, despite swimming 3 x weeks, and walking almost every day. I was frequently short of breath, and literally exhausted by mid afternoon and I didn't like it. MD's attributed it to middle age. Of course, there were other indicators that something was out of whack, but no one bothered to take note because, whatever the problem was, they attributed it to my "obvious" unhealthy lifestyle. Diets weren't working. I'd lose a few pounds and then hit a standstill. Only very low calorie diets seemed to work (1,000 calories or less) but I couldn't stick to them.

A few months ago, I decided to go it alone, based on what I knew about myself and my body. After much trial and error, I found a registered dietician who was willing to work with me and where I was in my journey - which meant that I didn't want to cook every day, and I didn't need the thought of food on my mind every waking minute. I also needed to incorporate the foods that I liked, needed to have prepared foods on hand every day for easy meal planning, and I needed to honor my belief that additives, preservatives, artificial sweeteners, and fat substitutes were not good for my body on the whole and that I could control and maintain my blood sugar by diet, reduce the inflammation of arthritis, and also lose weight, without medication or surgery.

So far, so good. I use the plate method for serving size, using a smaller plate to control portion size. I batch cook one day a week so that I have a soup, prepared salad, an egg and vegetable frittata and baked oatmeal, enough for the whole week since I live alone. I fill in with baked chicken or fish and quickly steamed vegetables. We figured out how to include wine, nightly if I choose, and an evening snack since I am insulin resistant. I eat foods that are known antioxidants and avoid those that increase the inflammatory response. This didn't happen overnight. I found that trying to diet while working out this system was too exhausting and setting me up for failure. I literally kept a list of foods I enjoyed and made adjustments in recipe preparation so that I didn't have to omit them. I haven't lost much weight during this process, but I haven't gained any either!

Working on these lifestyle changes was a major adjustment and I found that focusing on weight loss while doing this was too much for me to handle. I am ready to proceed with weight loss now as I feel that I have a solid plan. Now I weigh and measure portions without thought and can reach into the refrigerator and put a meal together within minutes without much thought or cooking and still be on track! I track my foods, and if I crave something, I make allowances and keep on stepping! No guilt, no beating myself up.

Somewhere along the way during this process, which has taken several weeks, I reached a place where I feel hopeful in the outcome of the steps I have taken to improve my health and my life. Working with my dietician has proved rewarding in other ways: I suffer from sleep apnea (newly discovered) and found out that lack of rest and sleep contributes to diabetes, hypertension, depression, weight gain and the lethargy that I experienced. I also found out that I am sensitive to gluten and dairy products after following an elimination diet. Gluten free eating is hard, but I am free of the digestive problems I had. I also have a little more energy and am working on incorporating more exercise into my life, taking into account physical limitations.

All in all, I would have pushed harder for answers and taken control of my life and my health much earlier if I had trusted myself a little more instead of relying on the guidance and opinions of others who did not have a vested interest in the outcome.

Edited by: MSRETIRED60 at: 9/22/2013 (12:39)
The life that I have is all that I have . . . . and I intend to live it to the fullest!


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GARDENGIRL2013
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9/22/13 10:34 A

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I don't know if this would work for kids living in the house all the time, but, I like to keep a few treats at my house for when the grand kids stop in. I keep frozen fruit juice bars and chocolate ice cream topping to drizzle over sliced bananas or caramel ice cream topping to dip apple slices in. They are happy with that. I always have baking ingredients and the kids love to bake with me - and they learn words in the cookbook, measurements, math, time, control, patience, etc.

Most people are about as happy as they make their minds up to be.
Abraham Lincoln.


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SANDRAPSKI
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9/22/13 9:59 A

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Wow - this topic sure has brought up a lot of emotion - maybe that's the real challenge.

You need to take care of yourself first, so you can take care of your kids as they get older. If, for the time being, portion control and making good choices are a challenge for you, then you need to stack the deck and make it as easy as possible to make good choices. Get rid of the junk food and take your kids out for a treat every once in while.

We need to teach our kids to make good choices too. Ask anyone who left a home where the emphasis was on solely on healthy food what happened when they got to college or moved into their first apartment. The "freshman fifteen" is not a myth (grin).

A lot of folk grow up in homes where healthy food is the norm, treats are treats (the kids are not allowed to graze from a snack-filled pantry at will), but food is not vilified. One ding dong is not going to make you fat. Repeatedly eating a box of them will.

Food is not good or bad. It's just food. Some of it we like better than others - no matter how many "lifestyle" changes I make, I'm always going to like dark chocolate better than broccoli - but I'm going to eat a lot more broccoli than chocolate.

Most of the people here on spark have the best of intentions. We grew up in a multitude of households with different approaches to eating, yet most of us are here because of our eating habits as adults. Our kids are going to function in a world full of options. We need to teach them to choose wisely and responsibly. Children are learners, ignorant not stupid. When we model learning, they too learn. As an adult, we have the option to buy a candy bar every time we go to the store. Because we're trying to life a healthier lifestyle, we don't do that. We also don't buy an apple every time we go to the store. Eventually we learn not to eat if we're not hungry and to think through the consequences of what we choose to eat.

Sorry for the length of this note; guess I'm really trying to say is most of us on Spark have a slightly skewed sense about food while we're trying to lose weight and change our long term lifestyle. Becoming militant about one position or another isn't very helpful in the long run because we really just need to make peace with ourselves about food and lifestyle. We can change - and that is probably the best message we can give our kids.

Good luck with your lifestyle changes. You will get to where you need to at a pace that works for you. If you are happy (or at least happier), so will be your kids.




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I.M.MAGIC
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9/22/13 7:40 A

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Seems like there's some consensus... to offering healthy alternatives instead.
Children--and people in general--learn most from the examples they see around them, so set them a good example.

Ancient wisdom...
"... Train a child in the way he should go, and when he is old he will not turn from it."

Some departure is normal, when they seek their own path... but as a general rule, this is true, we usually return to the things we learn in our childhood--and it's never too soon to start.

Good luck!
Kathy emoticon emoticon

"The real secret of success is enthusiasm..." Walter P. Chrysler said it, I believe it. That's what I want in my life--to give my imagination a chance, to live with energy and enthusiasm!

Ralph Waldo Emerson said 'Life belongs to the energetic.' But you don't have to be frenetic and hyper--some energy is quiet and steady, like a heartbeat... and that works too! LOL

Life comes in specific increments, which we receive as a gift of one moment at a time. That's why it's called t


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GRANDMABABA
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9/21/13 12:37 P

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Control what you can, allow for some treats, make the healthy choices fun



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QOFHXO
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9/21/13 9:34 A

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Modeling the healthy eating habits you would like your children to learn is the best thing you could do for them!
Best wishes.

"In every block of marble I see a statue as plain as though it stood before me, shaped and perfect in attitude and action. I have only to hew away the rough walls that imprison the lovely apparition to reveal it to the other eyes as mine see it.” ~ Michaelangelo




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BROADBRUSH
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9/21/13 9:28 A

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hi - why would you feel you are 'depriving' your kids when you choose to NOT give them junk which is basically no FOOD but CHEMICALS, ADDITIVES and poison in their systems.
read the labels and very soon you will see that an apple or fresh orange is much more desirable than things like twinkies that have a 30 yr shelf life!!!! yuck!!!
you can also make your own baked goods - some phyllo dough with freshly sliced apple, cinnamon and a sprinkle of brown sugar baked in the oven is absolutely delicious and yummy.
the cost is less than half of what you would buy in the grocery store.
this is an easy easy thing to solve and you will be doing GOOD FOR YOURSELF, YOUR HUBBY AND YOUR KIDS




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GWENHAVEN
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9/20/13 8:02 P

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Engage the children in your quest to eat healthier! Don't make it about losing weight, but about getting healthy. This means hey kids, we are going to find healthier alternatives to some of the treats we really like! Try new things that aren't full of sugar and fat. Go online and find fun, healthy recipes that the kids can help make. Even the 3 year old can help out, even though it might get a little messy. Google things like "healthy recipes for kids" or "healthy recipes kids can make", "healthy kid treats", and so on! You have a wealth of resources at your fingertips!

See if the kids can come up with healthy ideas that are good alternatives to chips. Tell them the basic criteria, like it has to have some vitamins in it, and not be deep fried, and not have a lot of sugar, or whatever you feel would work best.
Every once in a while, you can go out and get Blizzards, or individual packs of cookies, or something that you go OUT to get, but don't bring home and keep there. These can be "unhealthy treat but we gotta have it" excursions, maybe plan to do it once a month, and the kids can look forward to it. Let them vote on what the treat will be, or the destination.

Sure they might rebel a bit, but as a parent, that's what you have to do. We have to do things that are unpopular because we are teaching our children how to be good adults, how to take care of their bodies. They will not be scarred for life with emotional trauma because you said no junk food in the house. I'm sure you won't be mean to them about it, just be matter of fact and present it like it will be fun, but admit to them you know it may be hard for everyone (including you) to give up some favorite snacks, so you can all work together to find other treats to have instead! So you just stop feeling guilty! :) You're a great mom, and you're going to be an even better one, because you're going to stop trying to be their buddy, and be their good example and the one that really makes them take the path toward health. :)

Edited by: GWENHAVEN at: 9/20/2013 (20:07)
If you focus on results, you will never change.
If you focus on change, you will get results.
~Jack Dixon



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BEACHGIRL328
BEACHGIRL328's Photo Posts: 2,019
9/20/13 6:51 P

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Personally (and i am not a parent!) i think that if there are healthy snacks in the house and they become accustom to eating healthy they won't want the junk food. I also think that setting them up for healthy adulthood is a lot more important then getting a bag of potato chips at the age of 10 or 15. How many people on this web site were thin children? I was think as a young child but as i got older i was eating the same but became a lot less active so maybe eating better now will set them up for a healthier and happier life of course that is not to say they will never have another potato chip, cookie or cupcake but maybe not all in the same week?



FIFIFRIZZLE
FIFIFRIZZLE's Photo Posts: 1,264
9/20/13 2:50 P

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I am of the opinion that you keep the treats out of the house. It,s up to you to set the example, by doing not talking.
If you want them to have a treat every now and then, go out for a treat, not as a reward but just because you want to have some fun with them. Let them choose what they want and don't serve it with a dose of advice. If they don't eat it, refrain from commenting, unless it is to say, 'you really only wanted the icing, huh?' or some such. Don't you have much, and don,t make a big deal about it. Simply demonstrate an adult exercising restraint and enjoying an occasional outing. If they ask to go again, say, 'sure it,s nice to do that once in a while, and make a date for a month or so in the future.
Sometimes, bake cookies with one of the kids. Make just enough for the family, and get them to give any extras to the neighbors, their teacher, or to their friends. Do not bang on about the food, make the treat, have the fun, eat just one, or none, so set the example in what you do not what you say.
I think seeing my mother struggle with food has had a really bad effect on my sister,s and my eating habits. If only she had never dieted or just got on with it and had just kept quiet about her struggles, we would not have seen food and eating as problematic.
With my kids, our treats were to splurge on some exotic or more expensive fruit or to try a different type of cheese or bread. Or home baking by me or us together. Or a yummy smoothie. They loved and thrived on their food, and it was healthy food made with love. They grew up fit and healthy and with a curious and interested attitude to food. I wish I had, too!

Reframing my thinking to release excess weight forever.

If you always do what you always did... You always get what you always got!


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NOCHOA39
NOCHOA39's Photo SparkPoints: (14,453)
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9/20/13 12:50 P

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If I were you I'd keep the junk food out of the house. Talking about feeling guilty or "punishing" them, how guilty do you think you'll feel when they are overweight and struggling because you raised them on junkfood to keep yourself from feeling guilty about them not having it. Does that make sense? No it doesn't. What we all should do for our children as well as ourselves is to deny ourselves certain things whether it's completely or for a time in order to become better, physically, mentally and or emotionally.

I have children ages 16 and 13 that I have raised with too much junkfood. Although they are both athletes and in incredible physical condition they sometimes find it hard to eat healthy. They see the struggles that we, their parents have and find that they are going through the same struggle to discipline themselves when it comes to eating junk. But, since my husband and I have gotten serious about eating healthy so have they. We rarely have junkfood in the home anymore and they choose to drink water or some other healthy alternative to pop and other sugary drinks more often than not. So as a family we are slowly improving.

I don't mean to be preachy but take it from me your children will thank you in the end.

Emotion may help us get started in the right direction, but it is rarely there at the finish line. Sooner or later we must press forward without the support of emotion and employ discipline.


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ODDMENTTWEAK
Posts: 1,389
9/20/13 11:40 A

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I've been living out of my parents' house for a year, and I keep way more junk food around than they do. As a result, I've gained weight (there's also nobody but my partner to bug me to work out). I agree with the other posters - if your kids aren't exposed to junk food being in the house, they won't come to see it as normal. Overall, it's the access to junk at all times that's been more of a problem and reinforced my desire for it.

"I am only one, but still I am one. I cannot do everything, but still I can do something; and because I cannot do everything, I will not refuse to do something that I can do."
- Helen Keller


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MANDIETERRIER1
MANDIETERRIER1's Photo Posts: 13,492
9/20/13 10:40 A

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I think it is great to have healthy food in the house 90% of the time but maybe 10% of the time have a little treat. You can get single serving bags.

When I was growing up my mom tried so hard to feed us a healthy diet. And we didn't have any snack foods in the house. And I was seriously jealous of my friends that did have those snacks.

So when I got older I didn't learn to moderate and went overboard with junk food. And that is why I am on Spark People.

To make a long story longer my friends that grew up with that stuff in the house are not overweight. And most are the same weight they were when we graduated from High School. I never learned moderation and I am overweight.

Made it to my maintenance weight of 125 pounds.

Even though I have reached goal. I still don't know everything about weight loss.

Please read my blog

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LOLATURTLE
LOLATURTLE's Photo Posts: 359
9/20/13 10:04 A

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There are a lot of great replies here, and a lot of great suggestions!

I just wanted to share a resource. One thing that jumps out to me really strongly is the idea of not just changing what foods are in the house, but talking to and teaching kids about WHY we eat what we eat. I think this is hugely important. When they grow up and go out in the world, they'll be going out into the junk and fast food filled world we all struggle with, so they need to be prepared.

To that end, I have found this blog amazingly helpful in terms of reading about how to talk to kids about food, and what are the important issues in terms of psychology and teaching them HABITS. There are tons of really great posts, if you do some searching you can find answers to almost anything you're worrying about with regards to your kids' eating habits.

The blog is called "It's Not About Nutrition" and any internet search for that phrase should take you there (in case the link doesn't work).

itsnotaboutnutrition.squarespace.com/home/


I don't have children yet, but I plan to, and even not having had them yet I already worry abou their eating habits! So when I do, I will be reading this blog daily! I hope other parents find it helpful.



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BEINGFIT26
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9/20/13 9:43 A

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I personally do not stock a lot of treats. I buy them once in a blue moon. I think the kids should also get these treats from time to time. So to solve your problem, make it a habit only once a month or so.



ANNROW0354
ANNROW0354's Photo Posts: 603
9/20/13 9:38 A

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I have 5 adult children and they were never really denied treats and none of them are overweight. I am really the only one in the family who struggles with weight. They have a healthy attitude towards food and moderation. Now, I share a lot of the information that I have learned about nutrition and exercise with them so that they can avoid some of the problems I have experienced.
Obesity can be a family problem, however, and if both parents are overweight, then there is a higher likelihood that the children will be. I know this is a touchy subject, but parents are responsible for what their children eat and how active they are. My kids are always saying that they were always being told to go outside. Well, I rarely see kids playing outside now and I live across the street from an elementary school and even though no child at this school has a walk of more than 1/2 mile, the line of parents dropping off the kids is ridiculous.
Kids have enough stress these days with the expectations placed on them without adding a weight problem into the mix. Sometimes saying NO is the kindest and most loving and responsible thing you can do as a parent....even when it doesn't feel that way.

Ann

If you don't love your body now, you won't love it after you reach your goal!!!


PATTIEMCD
PATTIEMCD's Photo Posts: 875
9/19/13 10:22 A

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Wow ! What an awesome turn out for this one, very common question ! Kudos to all !!



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OMENDER
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9/19/13 10:09 A

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My kids are 5 and 7 and we do not keep chips and cookies in the house. I have a bit of ice cream right now which was for a special treat and that will last a long time. You are not depriving them by allowing them to eat healthfully. You are depriving them of nutrition and healthy lifelong habits if you are letting them eat junk every day.
My kids get dessert once a week at Grandma's house. She makes cookies, cakes, pies etc. and that is her special Grandma thing she does for Sunday dinner. They get Halloween and Easter candy and it is not like they never go to a party, so they get to eat treats there, too. But that is what cookies, cakes and chips are- special occasion treats.
If they do go crazy once in a while, they will remeber it and maybe think twice before doing it again. I definitely remember having to go to church on Easter Sunday with a horrible belly ache after gorging on candy. I have never looked at those chocolate bunnies the same way again.




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CDCSMITH2013
CDCSMITH2013's Photo Posts: 476
9/19/13 5:23 A

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I'm one of those people that had a sweet tooth in spite of having very limited sweet treats at home. The funny thing is that my mom used to buy "diet" ice cream (ice milk back in the day) and the kids weren't allowed to have it. But my mom didn't keep the regular stuff because she would eat it.

However, I agree that it is generally a learned behavior and hard to break the older you get. I like the ideas about making the treats truly treats. I also like the idea of creating more healthy regular treats. You can do a lot with popcorn. Plain for you, a smidge of brown sugar and cinnamon for the kids, etc. My older kids thought my husband's "gourmet" appples were a treat - cut apples with peanut butter in the center (so it looked like a flower).



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GRACIE10
GRACIE10's Photo Posts: 5
9/18/13 6:23 P

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All I can speak of is MY experience. Growing up, we had snacks once in awhile. It was a rare treat. I can say that growing up not having snacks did NOTHING to promote healthy eating for me. LOL My kids range from 9-12. I couldn't have any chocolate snack in the house as I'd eat it all. BUT, when I decided to lose weight, I did it by tracking everything that goes into my mouth. I stick to a calorie range.

Right from the start I learned I had to watch my portions sizes. I weight or measure most everything. Doing this, I can easily stay within my calories range. If I'm at the low end of my range, I'll go ahead and have ice cream. I have to just measure it out and eat a "portion".

What I keep in mind is the first bite tastes the same as the last. Just cut out some bites in the middle and put the rest away for the kids. I am finding that it's easy for me to pass up the ice cream because it generally doesn't fit into my nutrition goals. I've lost 33 pounds in 4 months. I'm not stopping progress for a triple sized portion of chocolate ice cream. NOT WORTH IT.

I keep snacks in the house. I try to buy things that I don't crave, but they love chocolate ice cream. I just choose not to eat it, though I'll lick the spoon when I dip it out. It's a choice. Lose weight or eat a temporary pleasure.



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BOREDA
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9/18/13 4:38 P

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Although a number of posters have cited examples to the contrary, in general the habits we form in childhood will stay with us throughout our lives (unless we make conscious and frequently difficult efforts to break them). So the obvious conclusion is not to keep cookies, ice cream etc. in the house as an "everyday" food, but rather to make it a special treat. In my house my mother would buy one packet of biscuits (jaffa cakes or Maryland cookies) a week; my sister and I knew that if we devoured them in one sitting, nothing more would be forthcoming for another week. Cakes were never bought, only home made, and we had to help make them, so we learned to cook -- the big treat was licking the scrapings of raw mix out of the bowl after the cake had been poured into the tin and put in the oven! Ice cream: once a week, on Saturdays, and only in the summer after we had helped by mowing the lawn. Burgers, pizzas, take-aways: never, all our food was cooked at home. As a result, I have grown up without a particularly "sweet tooth" and I eat almost entirely home-cooked food. This sort of regime doesn't necessarily prevent weight problems in later life, but it inculcates good habits about healthy eating and portion control, which makes it easier to deal with any later weight issues. And, incidentally, my sister and I were never laughed at or scorned by our peers, or viewed (or saw ourselves) as being "deprived" in any way.



PATIENTHAND
PATIENTHAND's Photo Posts: 259
9/18/13 2:14 P

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I thought raisins were candy until I was maybe 8 years old. The only real candy and junk I got as a kid was with my own allowance money, in those days it was a dime or a quarter, and there really was penny candy. I would walk to the 7-11 on saturday morning, buy my candy and come home and eat most of it watching cartoons and movies. We just did not have junk around the house. Popcorn was a big treat. Halloween was a HUGE deal.

Looking back I am really thankful my mom taught good nutrition, and we learned a lot about food, I was raised Adventist and mostly vegetarian. We had lots of fruit, occasionally pretzels and popcorn, and rarely cookies and cakes. I never felt deprived, or odd. I did not have a sweet tooth, or crave what was not a normal part of my diet.

Perhaps the question you need to be asking yourself is.. what life long example am I teaching ym kids about food? What do I want them to have ingrained in them and carry into a healthy adult hood?

Candice and her dog Leah.

"Life is juicy, let it dribble down your chin." Sark


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AUNTCAT
AUNTCAT's Photo Posts: 142
9/18/13 10:22 A

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I agree. I had gotten into the bad habit of buying too many snacks. Now I am buying them much less often. My kids hate it when I read labels. Just yesterday my daughter chose to put 2 yummy looking apples in the cart. She was concerned about the price. Much more affordable when one is not buying chips and soda. It also makes the treats more special when they aren't a regular thing.



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FATASHNOMORE
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9/17/13 7:56 P

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You aren't "punishing" them at all, merely teaching them the right way to eat before it's too late. It doesn't have to be an all or nothing affair, either. For example, they could each pick their treat at a check out line, and since there is one snack per child there won't be anything left for you to dip into yourself. There is also a lot to be said for food art. My nine-year-old sister doesn't particularly like to eat healthy, but she does like to design what is on her plate. When she comes over to my house I can win her over with creative templates that can be found on Pinterest.

Ash :)


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NMINDSEYE
NMINDSEYE's Photo Posts: 26
9/17/13 6:26 P

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I think now is a great opportunity to introduce the kids to a variety of vegetables and fruits with its different tastes and textures. As mentioned before, have them share in preparing the food. Make happy smiley faces or some other artwork on the plate with fruits and vegetables, or have fruit with dip. Maybe you can take them on family outing trips to the farmers markets/orchards and pick fruits and vegetables. Having healthy habits can go a long way, especially when they see you and your husband enjoying it. I wish my parents did this. Sweets can be given at special times and in limited doses. This is not a punishment. I rather this type of "punishment" than the punishment of having to sit in the dentist's chair on many visits for cavities, root canals, etc. Plus the "punishment" of paying cash out of pocket for some dentist procedures.

"Losing weight helps you look good in clothes. Exercise helps you look good naked."--Anonymous


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BITHOO
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9/17/13 3:37 P

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As the mom of two children, I can tell you that children develop their own sense of taste, whatever mom feeds them -- once they're past the age of two or three. Kids who ate anything and everything (peas, squash, etc.) as toddlers may refuse every vegetable at age 5. And I have never known a kid, no matter what his/her upbringing, who didn't enjoy an occasional sweet or salty treat!

I agree with many here that "occasional" is probably the operative word. Stocking chips and sweets in the pantry just because they exist may create a sense (which mom has) they they SHOULD be part of the diet -- and not that they MAY be.

I would hate, however, to throw out the baby with the bathwater. Every kid, IMO, should have a chance to bake cookies, decorate a cake, eat a hot fudge sundae, try a whoopie pie. Just not at every meal!



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SEATTLE9
SEATTLE9's Photo Posts: 625
9/17/13 3:36 P

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While raising my kids the rule was they could have fruit, bread, or milk for a snack. Treats were connected with special outings - like walking to the ice cream shop for a cone or buying chips for a picnic. They accepted this without complaint - probably because I didn't feel guilty. Now they are all grown, and none of them have ever said they felt deprived.

It's never too late to become the person you are meant to be!


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SIMONEKP
SIMONEKP's Photo Posts: 2,458
9/17/13 1:56 P

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You can take the kids out for a treat once per week, they really don't need more than that

Simone

"Patience and perseverance have a magical effect before which difficulties disappear and obstacles vanish." - John Quincy Adams

No matter how slow you go, you're still lapping everyone on the couch!
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KICKINGKILOS
KICKINGKILOS's Photo Posts: 1,339
9/17/13 1:32 P

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I think its not a punishment, like everyone else.
You can make banana icecream and maybe add choco chips to their cereal.
Peanut butter with apples.
And chocolates occassionally.
My kids are aloof from sodas and they rarely eat chocolates.
You can do it.

ps.I am not saying I am a perfect mom. I have my own tipsy course.

SW (APRIL2012) 157 POUNDS (71.2 KILOS)
SW (AUGUST2013) 143.5 pounds (65.1 KILOS)

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It's now or never *****Determination trumps motivation

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MBRANDO
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9/17/13 10:54 A

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I don't think it is a punishment to not have unhealthy calorie laden junk food in the house. The sweetness of fruit is just as good as a candy bar and much healthier for them. You want the best for your kids, start them off right by nipping the unhealthy eating in the bud right now or else in 20 years they will be where you are now. Just my opinion.

“The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.” Mahatma Ghandi



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CLARK971
CLARK971's Photo Posts: 660
9/16/13 7:53 P

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I think COO_KIE has a great suggestion. Not really making things forbidden but not unlimited access.

If you can't have certain things in the house, don't feel bad. Don't feel bad about getting healthy and setting a good example for your kids.



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COO_KIE
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9/16/13 2:56 P

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How about having it available for the kids once a week, or a couple times a month? Not as a reward....just as something 'different' for dessert. This way, it is unpredictable as to which day, but they know they aren't forbidden any food. Yet no one is tempted to deny them or reward them with food. No, "Johnny, you didn't eat enough peas," or "You got a D in school, so no cake."
Also, No, "You ate a BIG salad, now you get TWO cookies." Tuesday you had peaches for dessert, tonight you have a cookie, tomorrow you don't have dessert because you had a bigger than usual supper.............each food is as important as the other, because if the cookie is 'more' then the peaches must be 'less.'
You don't have to explain why dessert isn't on the menu any more than why celery is not offered today. We eat different at different times.

If this was your last day, how would you spend it?


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GOHAWKIS1
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9/16/13 1:48 P

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Buy chips and cookies in single serving 100 calorie packages. You could buy ice cream, measure out 1/2 servings, put them in cups w/ lids to keep in the freezer. If you're afraid you'll go crazy with the chips and cookies, designate one special place in a cupboard that's only for the kids's stuff. You could let them have 1 thing from that cupboard each day but only if they ask you first. That way you have a little more control over what and how much they eat. And if you think you can handle it, you could have just one thing, too, to eat at the same time they're having they're snack. Maybe you could do it when they get home from school or after a nap. It would be a good time good together time at the kitchen table. I would vary it from day to day--a snack from the cupboard or some fruit, or some crackers w/ cheese or peanut butter, maybe some vegetables with low-fat ranch dressing.

...Forgetting what is behind and straining toward what is ahead, I press on toward the goal to win the prize for which God has called me heavenward in Christ Jesus." Phil. 3:13b-14

Laura Lee


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SKABELS2
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9/16/13 10:42 A

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When I was growing up, we never had soda in the house. We were allowed to have it if we went out, though, and we always had soda in a restaurant! I never developed a taste for it as a result. It's not something I crave, and I can view it as an occasional treat.

I do like the idea of telling your kids in age appropriate terms why they don't have treats in the house. It's important for them to know that cookies are not regular every day foods.



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JENNKFIT
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9/16/13 10:27 A

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Pushing cookies and other junk food on kids 3-10 is a punishment. Kids that age shouldn't really be exposed to so much American junk food so young, it can set up a life time of bad eating habits they'll spend years trying to break. Be a family of healthy snacks. Their cookies should be carrots, their cupcakes, apples. By teaching kids that young that these are the good snacks they will never really develop a taste for the other stuff, and that other stuff isn't going to taste good if they're raised on good foods. You don't have to demonize junk food either, just don't have it as a part of your life to begin with. Feel guilty when you do give them junk food not when you don't.

Having kids does NOT mean having junk food in the house. We must unprogram that part of our brains and fast. Our children are the future and all the food they get now is the foundation of a life time. When they are in their 20's they will NOT thank you for their cheese-doodle and soda addictions when they have diabetes and heart problems. They will have jealous friends eye them with envy when they come along with their healthy food for lunch at the office and they are trim, fit and healthy.

I'm 5'8" and determined to make a change now.

Check out my Spark Team!
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DESIDERATA~GIRL
DESIDERATA~GIRL's Photo Posts: 243
9/15/13 3:51 P

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You are depriving them by not giving them saturated fat, sugar and the junk that makes the body worse. They may not be overweight, but that does not mean that the are healthy internally. Try and push fruit, healthier options like yogurt, healthy cereals and the occasional ice-creams and such. You are the parent and they will thank you for caring about their health. Until they decide what they want, you are in control. When they get overweight and have future health problems, they may even blame you!

~** Sarah **~

"You are a Child of the Universe, no less than the Trees and the Stars; you have a right to be here. And whether or not it is clear to you,
no doubt the Universe is unfolding as it should."


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MZZCHIEF
MZZCHIEF's Photo Posts: 9,040
9/15/13 3:02 P

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Remember that being a parent sometimes means making unpopular choices in your kids best interest.

You can be friends later.. um... like 20 years later....when they're adults? ha

: )
Mzzchief

Never underestimate the value of getting out of your own way.

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 current weight: 149.0 
 
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WHOLENEWME79
WHOLENEWME79's Photo Posts: 918
9/15/13 9:36 A

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When I was in that age range, things like ice cream, cookies, chips, Little Debbie cakes- They were treats, not snacks. Mom made sure we had apples and peanut butter, PB&J sandwiches, milk, granola bars, etc., for our snacks. The days when we had the Dole frozen fruit bars- Man, my sister and I loved those, and they were just fruit and sugar- Nowadays you can find plain fruit frozen bars.

Kids are resilient, and they are all young enough that, though they may cry, and scream, and act like little jerks, you are the boss, and if you say "No" to any of those things, they can listen or go to a friends house to eat them.

You are not punishing your kids by making this choice- You are saving them from the heart ache of poor health and being overweight later in life.

There are no elevators in the house of success.
H. H. Vreeland

You may have to fight a battle more than once to win it- Margaret Thatcher


 current weight: 200.3 
 
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ROSETTAWOOD
SparkPoints: (33)
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Posts: 11
9/15/13 9:28 A

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I've been considering the unhappy personal situation that you said, and its impact on your family. Sometimes we are too close to a problem to see the solution. When losing weight two of the things you have to learn are control and discipline. If you cannot have this I think you are not ready yet. Do not put the punishments in your children.
-Rosetta



HAPPYLISA17
Posts: 213
9/15/13 8:13 A

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Good call.



 current weight: 175.0 
 
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MARYBETH4884
MARYBETH4884's Photo SparkPoints: (52,787)
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Posts: 1,459
9/14/13 5:08 P

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Sounds like you're really on the right track!

Mary Beth
Maryland EST

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 Pounds lost: 151.2 
 
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