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MOTIVATED@LAST's Photo MOTIVATED@LAST Posts: 14,172
1/31/14 1:39 A

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The seated dumbbell row is more challenging, as you are holding the weight well away from your center of gravity.

Also, "lifting heavy" is all about the degree of challenge, not the actual weight used. Because it is held away from your body, seated rows are more challenging, even if the weight is lighter.

Keep up the great work!

The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man.


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1/30/14 9:04 A

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Thanks. That's a good idea. I do with the dumbbells since, at some point, I may not have access to a gym. Basically, I want to have the option of doing my strength training at home. Thanks again for the idea. I think I may try that one out today.



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1/29/14 7:06 P

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I would try a bent over double row, which is more difficult, since you don't have the bracing action of the bench but should be easier than the seated row.

Honestly, the only time I do seated rows is with a cable attachment.

“Sometimes the moments that challenge us the most, define us.” - Deena Kastor

Agatsu Kettlebell Instructor
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1/29/14 5:45 P

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Thanks. That makes sense. I thought maybe the difficulty was due to holding two dumbbells instead of one. I'm struggling to do 5 reps with 15 lbs and keeping good form. Thanks for the encouragement.



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1/29/14 5:39 P

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Given the physics of a seated dumbbell row and an a one-arm dumbbell row, it's pretty understandable that the former is more difficult. You're holding the weights parallel to the floor (against gravity from the beginning) and then moving them away from your body (increasing the force on your shoulder/elbows/wrists). You're working against gravity for the entire exercise, vs with the one-arm row, you're only working against gravity on the pulling motion.

In my personal opinion, the only way to improve on any strength exercise is just to dig deep and find the will to do one more rep (or hold for one more second). For me, a lot of the barrier to improvement is mental (once I've been at a certain weight for a while) and I just have to pick a time and push through it.



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1/29/14 5:26 P

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I've been doing the one-arm dumbbell row for awhile. I've been using 15 lbs. at home and 20 lb at the Y for the one arm row. The seated dumbbell row is difficult for me. I can only seem to do 1 set of 5 reps with 15 lbs. and that's pushing it. That takes me less than 30 seconds. I'd like to alternate between these two when I do my strength training. Do one on one day and the other on the next. I want to lift heavy (even if my weights seem light to others). Does anyone have suggestions on how to improve on the seated dumbbell row? I'm open to ideas.

If it helps, for the upper body portion of my (full body) strength training, I am doing: reverse plank, dumbbell shrugs, dumbbell chest press or pushups; assisted pull-up or dumbbell pullovers.

Core includes:
a) airplane pose, t stand, hip flexor, and planks
b) at least once a week, I include bridge-ups
c) may include dumbbell side bends or modified side planks as a trade off for the lunge and twist with medicine ball
~suggestions on how to improve on side planks and core in general would be appreciated too

Lower body:
a) lateral lunges, runner's lunges, standing abduction, single leg bridge-ups or bridges, lunge & twist with medicine ball, calf rocking with dumbbells (mainly for the ankles)
b) trying to decide on walking lunges or single leg squats with toe touches

I know this seems like a lot but the whole strength training takes me about 40 to 45 minutes. Mainly because the lunges take me 6 minutes (lateral and runner's). I enjoy the lower body workouts best with the core coming in second, and the upper body last. I am trying to make sure that I literally hit every part of the body.

Thanks for taking the time to read this as I realize that I have given a lot of information. If more information is needed please ask...



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