Advertisement -- Learn more about ads on this site.

 
Message Boards
FORUM:   Fitness and Exercise
TOPIC:  

Technical difference between jogging and running



Click here to read our frequently asked Fitness and Exercise questions.

 
  Reply Create A New Topic
Search the
Message Boards:
Search
  I Liked This Topic Subscribe to this Discussion Share
Add This to My SparkFavorites
Advertisement -- Learn more about ads on this site.

Author: Message: Sort First Post on Top


DASHKATH
Posts: 861
9/10/13 5:09 A

DASHKATH's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I love yogageek's definition. I'm going to use that from now on



FEELING_FROGGY
FEELING_FROGGY's Photo Posts: 65
9/9/13 10:48 P

FEELING_FROGGY's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Thanks for all the feedback - makes sense to me. Just wanted confirmation that I am, indeed, a runner. Not the fastest but doing it none-the-less emoticon



 Pounds lost: 84.6 
 
0
22.25
44.5
66.75
89


MOTIVATED@LAST
MOTIVATED@LAST's Photo Posts: 14,028
9/9/13 8:25 P

MOTIVATED@LAST's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
The spelling.

OK, flippancy aside, unlike horses, where there is a technical difference between walking, trotting, cantering and galloping, in humans, there is no technical difference between jogging and running. With both, there is a part of each stride where both feet are airborne (unlike with walking, where at least one foot is always on the ground).

Common usage is that jogging is a slow run, but that's just language, and I don't think there is an agreed speed to differentiate the two.

M@L

The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man.


 current weight: 178.0 
 
220
203.5
187
170.5
154


DRAGONCHILDE
DRAGONCHILDE's Photo SparkPoints: (56,424)
Fitness Minutes: (14,252)
Posts: 9,587
9/9/13 6:52 P



DRAGONCHILDE's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Personally, I've always felt that if both of your feet are leaving the ground at once, you're running, period. Whether someone wants to call it jogging or running is a personal choice. I hate the term jogging, myself (I just don't like the way the word sounds) but everyone has their preference. There's no technical difference at all. Running slow is still running. :)

Heather
Writer, mother, wife, and breadwinner. I love to run, but running doesn't love me, so I'm switching to my low-impact bike.

I'm not pregnant, just fat: My blog.

fatnotpregnant.blogspot.com/


 current weight: 175.4 
 
211
197
183
169
155


YOGAGEEK
SparkPoints: (1,675)
Fitness Minutes: (1,241)
Posts: 130
9/9/13 1:49 P

YOGAGEEK's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Well, jogging's more of a subset of running, like sprinting, rather than a different type of movement, like walking. That being said, I don't think there's a standard definition; a PP stated 9 mph (7-min mile), while Wikipedia, citing the BBC, states 6 mph (10-min mile).

That being said, in general usage the term "jogging" tends to be more of a distinction of intensity than speed, and as such is highly subjective. For instance, you might jog as part of your warm-up for a run. But the speed at which a seasoned runner moves for their jogging warm-up would be the speed someone like me runs for the *actual* run. For that reason, even if there were a standard distinction between jogging and running, I wouldn't think it's terribly useful for individual fitness purposes.

Whatever speed you're going at, you're running. Call it what it is and be proud of yourself ^_^

Edited by: YOGAGEEK at: 9/9/2013 (13:50)


NANLEYKW
NANLEYKW's Photo SparkPoints: (51,958)
Fitness Minutes: (26,258)
Posts: 827
9/9/13 11:53 A

NANLEYKW's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
To me, "running" is a gait and "jogging" is a speed. I am not fast--certainly nowhere near a 7-minute mile--but when people refer to what I do as jogging, it drives me a bit nuts. And I wouldn't dream of calling someone who finishes a marathon in under 3:30:00 (an 8-minute mile) a jogger.



51 Days until:  Chicago Marathon
 
100
75
50
25
0


KCLARK89
KCLARK89's Photo SparkPoints: (24,461)
Fitness Minutes: (13,320)
Posts: 1,061
9/9/13 11:27 A

KCLARK89's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I really don't see the big difference in what you call it. If you are walking at a brisk pace vs SPEED walking, you're still walking, so the way I see it, if you are going faster than WALKING, you're running. Some people jog/run faster than others and some go slower. You say tomato, I say tomahto. Same difference :)



 current weight: -3.6  under
 
5
2.5
0
-2.5
-5


LEC358
SparkPoints: (9,059)
Fitness Minutes: (6,555)
Posts: 2,047
9/9/13 10:18 A

Send Private Message
Reply
I don't really think there is one. According to the internet, the line between running and jogging is at a speed of 9mph (7 min/mile give or take) which is pretty darn fast. As long as you're using good form, it doesn't matter what you call it, it's the same exercise.



 current weight: -0.8  under
 
5
2.5
0
-2.5
-5


FEELING_FROGGY
FEELING_FROGGY's Photo Posts: 65
9/9/13 10:10 A

FEELING_FROGGY's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
What is the real difference? I'm wondering if I'm jogging vs running but not sure what makes them techincally different.



 Pounds lost: 84.6 
 
0
22.25
44.5
66.75
89


 
Page: 1 of (1)  
Search  

I Liked This Topic Subscribe to this Discussion Share
Add This to My SparkFavorites
Report Innappropriate Post


Thread URL: http://www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/messageboard.asp?imboard=6&imparent=31941951

Review our Community Guidelines



 
Diet Resources: diabetes portion control | portion control containers | portion control diets