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Lame Duck Day

Thursday, February 06, 2014

Lame Duck Day



When : Always February 6th

Hey, today is everything it's quacked up to be. Lame Duck Day is set aside to give recognition to people whose tenure in a position is running out.

Okay, so you are probably thinking that a "lame duck" is a duck with some sort of injury. If only that were the reason for toady! Rather, a "Lame Duck" by human, definition is a person who is in a position of some kind, and will soon be "shown the door". The best example is an incumbent politician who lost in the November elections. They usually remain in office until the beginning of January. It also applies to leaders, managers, etc, who are retiring or whose term of office is up.

During the interim period, a Lame Duck is usually far less effective, and frequently ineffective. After all, loyalties will soon shift. It's impossible to rally the troops to one more cause or project.



On Lame Duck Day...

If you are a Lame Duck: Enjoy those final days. Reflect upon you successes, and the joys and rewards the position provided to you. Kick back a little and have some fun today, and in the remaining days.

If you know a Lame Duck: Supporters should provide recognition and support. Non-supporters can cut the Lame Duck a little slack today. They will soon be gone.

If you are a duck and you are lame, seek medical attention.



Origin of Lame Duck Day:
On February 6, 1933, the 20th amendment to the U.S. Constitution went into effect. This amendment addressed presidential succession. Now there's a lame duck issue.

This Day in History February 6th

1778 American Revolutionary War: In Paris the Treaty of Alliance and the Treaty of Amity and Commerce are signed by the United States and France signaling official recognition of the new republic. (1778)

Massachusetts becomes the sixth state to ratify the United States Constitution. (1778)

Battle of San Domingo: British naval victory against the French in the Caribbean. (1806)

New Jersey grants the first American railroad charter to John Stevens. (1815)

The first 86 African American immigrants sponsored by the American Colonization Society depart New York to start a settlement in present-day Liberia. (1820)

Signing of the Treaty of Waitangi, establishing New Zealand as a British colony. (1840)

The first minstrel show in the United States, The Virginia Minstrels, opens (Bowery Amphitheatre in New York City). (1843)

American Civil War: The U.S. Navy gives the Union its first victory of the war, capturing Fort Henry, Tennessee in the Battle of Fort Henry. (1862)

Spanish-American War: The Treaty of Paris, a peace treaty between the United States and Spain, is ratified by the United States Senate. (1899)

British women over the age of 30 get the right to vote. (1918)

The Washington Naval Treaty is signed in Washington, D.C., limiting the naval armaments of United States, Britain, Japan, France, and Italy. (1922)

World War II: The United Kingdom declares war on Thailand. (1942)

The Broker, a Pennsylvania Railroad passenger train derails near Woodbridge Township, New Jersey. The accident kills 85 people and injures over 500 more. The wreck is one of the worst rail disasters in American history. (1951)

Elizabeth II becomes queen regnant of the United Kingdom and the other Commonwealth realms upon the death of her father, George VI. At the exact moment of succession, she was in a treehouse at the Treetops Hotel in Kenya. (1952)

Jack Kilby of Texas Instruments files the first patent for an integrated circuit. (1959)

At Cape Canaveral, Florida, the first successful test firing of a Titan intercontinental ballistic missile is accomplished. (1959)

In testimony before a United States Senate subcommittee, Lockheed Corporation president Carl Kotchian admits that the company had paid out approximately $3 million in bribes to the office of Japanese Prime Minister Kakuei Tanaka. 91976)

The Blizzard of 1978, one of the worst Nor'easters in New England history, hit the region, with sustained winds of 65 mph and snowfall of 4" an hour. (1978)

Michael Jordan makes his signature slam dunk from the free throw line inspiring Air Jordan and the Jumpman logo. (1988)

Willamette Valley Flood of 1996: Floods in the Willamette Valley of Oregon, United States, causes over US$500 million in property damage throughout the Pacific Northwest. (1996)

Washington National Airport is renamed Ronald Reagan National Airport. (1998)
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  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

DEBBIEANNE1124 2/7/2014 1:04AM

    emoticon

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PMAY0313 2/6/2014 1:41PM

    emoticon

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HANSBRINK 2/6/2014 11:47AM

  I am familiar with the term applied to politicians. I thought the term "Short-Timer" applied to regular joes in the workforce.

thanks for the history tidbits.

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PLMITCH 2/6/2014 11:16AM

    LOL!

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PATRICIAAK 2/6/2014 5:34AM

    odd time of year to have it

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