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Labor Day

Monday, September 02, 2013

emoticon Labor Day emoticon

When: Always the first Monday in September

Dedicated in honor of the worker, it is also appropriately called the "workingman's holiday". The holiday is dedicated to you in respect and appreciation for the work you do in or outside of the home, union or non-union, big company, small companies, or government. As long as you work somewhere at something, this holiday is for you!

The first Labor Day was held celebrated in New York City on September 5, 1882 and was started by the Central Labor Union in New York City. In 1884, it was moved to the first Monday in September where it is celebrated today. Labor Day quickly became popular and one state after another voted it as a holiday. On June 28, 1894, the U.S. congress voted it a national holiday.

Labor Day is also viewed as the official end of summer. While the Fall Equinox is still a couple of weeks away, kids go back to school and summer vacations are over. So this marks the end of the season. Many people celebrate this weekend with one last picnic. It is also the date that many people close up the pool, and put away the boats.

Was it McGuire or Maguire? Either Peter McGuire or Matthew Maguire is the Creator of Labor Day. Peter J. McGuire, was an active labor organizer. He was also general secretary of the Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners and a co-founder of the American Federation of Labor. He was believed to be the first to suggest a day be dedicated to American workers and their accomplishments. Matthew Maguire however, was secretary of the Central Labor Union in New York in 1882 and many believed that he proposed the holiday in 1882.

More Information:
The History of Labor Day From the U.S. Department of Labor- - they should know.
www.dol.gov/laborday/his
tory.htm


A Positive Light- Our Labor Day
www.johnshepler.com/arti
cles/laborday.html


This Day in History September 2nd

Final War of the Roman Republic: Battle of Actium off the western coast of Greece, forces of Octavian defeat troops under Mark Antony and Cleopatra. (31 BC)

The Great Fire of London breaks out and burns for three days, destroying 10,000 buildings including St Paul's Cathedral. (1666)

The United States Department of the Treasury is founded. (1789)

During what became known as the September Massacres of the French Revolution, rampaging mobs slaughter three Roman Catholic Church bishops, more than two hundred priests, and prisoners believed to be royalist sympathizers. (1792)

The Royal Navy bombards Copenhagen with fire bombs and phosphorus rockets to prevent Denmark from surrendering its fleet to Napoleon. (1807)

Oberlin College in Oberlin, Ohio is founded by John Jay Shipherd and Philo P. Stewart. (1833)

A solar super storm affects electrical telegraph service. (1859)

American Civil War: President Abraham Lincoln reluctantly restores Union General George B. McClellan to full command after General John Pope's disastrous defeat at the Second Battle of Bull Run. (1862)

American Civil War: Union forces enter Atlanta, Georgia, a day after the Confederate defenders flee the city, ending the Atlanta Campaign. (1864)

Franco-Prussian War: Battle of Sedan Prussian forces take Napoleon III of France and 100,000 of his soldiers prisoner. (1870)

Rock Springs massacre: in Rock Springs, Wyoming, 150 White miners, who are struggling to unionize so they could strike for better wages and work conditions, attack their Chinese fellow workers killing 28, wounding 15 and forcing several hundred more out of town. (1885)

Vice President of the United States Theodore Roosevelt utters the famous phrase, "Speak softly and carry a big stick" at the Minnesota State Fair. (1901)

Labor Day Hurricane of 1935: a large hurricane hits the Florida Keys killing 423. (1935)

World War II: Combat ends in the Pacific Theater: the Instrument of Surrender of Japan is signed by Japanese Foreign Minister Mamoru Shigemitsu and accepted aboard the battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay. (1945)

Vietnam declares its independence, forming the Democratic Republic of Vietnam. (1945)

United States Air Force C-130A-II is shot down by fighters over Yerevan in Armenia when it strays into Soviet airspace while conducting a sigint mission. All crew members are killed. (1958)

CBS Evening News becomes U.S. network television's first half-hour weeknight news broadcast, when the show is lengthened from 15 to 30 minutes. (1963)

NASA announces the cancellation of two Apollo missions to the Moon, Apollo 15 (the designation is re-used by a later mission), and Apollo 19. (1970)

The UN's International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda finds Jean Paul Akayesu, the former mayor of a small town in Rwanda, guilty of nine counts of genocide. (1998)
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FCARMICH 9/3/2013 7:30PM

  okay

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NWFL59 9/2/2013 5:49PM

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PMAY0313 9/2/2013 1:30PM

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HANSBRINK 9/2/2013 12:32PM

  Yes, Happy Labor Day!

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TXGRANDMA 9/2/2013 10:49AM

    Very interesting! Thanks for posting! emoticon

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KNYAGENYA 9/2/2013 10:36AM

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PATRICIAAK 9/2/2013 10:33AM

    Enjoying the day off

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