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    STRONG_SARAH   24,789
SparkPoints
20,000-24,999 SparkPoints
 
 
Italian nutritionist

Saturday, August 31, 2013

I've started following a diet plan from an italian nutritionist that is 1450 calories. Just for kicks I plugged what I ate into the spark tracker and it says 890 calories! Why? Because I couldn't eat all the bread she gave me. The italian diet is huge on carbs and after so many years of low-carb I couldn't do the 50% carb she recommends.

Another thing, the calories are different. I mean a 200 gr potato is either 180 calories on SP or 200 on an italian calorie website. Who do I trust? And how do we know the truth?

I mean, they tell us a 200 gram potato is x calories and we have to believe them because we're not in the lab, we're not the scientists. But what if they are wrong?
So far I have not lost any weight through tracking on the SP website. Maybe I'll try the italian one and see.
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  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

CYBERCITYSHELL 9/10/2013 3:05AM

    I think regarding the potatoe I would just compromise and go half way so 190. I hope you added some more calories to make up for the carbs you didn't manage to have. Keep up the great work Sarah, and remember you don't need to be too strict on yourself because as you said "you are not fat".
So you more want to maintain your currant weight. emoticon

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SPARK_JO 9/1/2013 1:21PM

    About your potato comment: when it comes to grown stuff, we don't know exactly how much calories there's in it. There are tons of varieties of potatoes, with more or less starch, or apples, with various sugar levels. Also, is there more sugar in a ripe cantaloupe than a green one? I guess so.

Bottom line: the only way to really know how much we eat exactly would be to eat only processed stuff than comes in single serving little bags, and we don't want that, don't we? I guess we have to live with that uncertainty ;-)

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BEACH_NUT 8/31/2013 10:09AM

    Counting calories is complicated. emoticon And, like as you mentioned, it is also extremely difficult to count calories. emoticon

I use the SP Nutrition & Fitness Calculators, albeit so very irregularly, and they just do not add up. Not to mention, who has time(?)...I'd rather spend that time doing more fitness! emoticon

I have jumped off the calorie-counting bandwagon! emoticon I've made some small practical adjustments. Instead of counting calories, I choose foods that use more calories, I consume the right kinds of calories and I eat smaller portions. This, along with a regular daily fitness routine has given me the freedom from the silly counting.


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PDQ1203 8/31/2013 9:28AM

    emoticon

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ROCKLAND2010 8/31/2013 8:30AM

    This is a new approach to dieting. I will be interested to hear how it goes. Thanks for sharing.

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RHYMESWITHBABY 8/31/2013 6:48AM

    Apparently the number of calories that the body can use in any given food is also affected by how processed the food is. That is one of the reasons we are urged to favour whole grains over more refined foods -- the body uses more energy to extract the nutrients, so the calories you actually get from the food are fewer than what it contains according to the scientific method used to calculate them. (Also, the different calorie counts you've found might be because the calculation method is inexact, and relies on averages.)

I would be terribly hungry on a high-carb diet. One of the ways I was able to lose 60 pounds was by following a higher protein diet that kept me feeling fuller longer. Lately whenever I have a day of increased carbs, I find myself constantly running around looking for low-calorie snacks because my stomach is rumbling. I've gotten used to limiting bread and substituting other grains for wheat (not exclusively, more like expanding my range). But maybe the body eventually adapts to a higher carb intake.

It would be interesting to see what your results are. I hope you will report back to us on what you find out.

Comment edited on: 8/31/2013 6:50:45 AM

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SPARK_JO 8/31/2013 5:16AM

    I was always wondering what an Italian nutritionist would advise: eat cookies for breakfast, rice for lunch, and pasta for dinner?

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KACEYSW 8/31/2013 2:48AM

    emoticon

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