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    AMANDANCES   29,491
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Size Means Nothing

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

You know, it ought to be a law that you can't save old clothes past, oh let's say 10 years.

(People would NOT believe what is still in my closet. Although I've gotten rid of everything I wore in high school, there is still stuff in there from college, well over 20 years ago.)

So one of the recent SparkCoach lessons was to re-evaluate your weight-loss goals and re-examine your goal weight. When I started this, I knew I wanted to lose my baby weight, but I wasn't sure how long it would take to get back to my "Commercially thin" standards for performance. (It's very true the camera adds 20 pounds, and the video camera adds 30, I swear it. Youtube tends to add another 5-10 to that!)

As far as the numbers, I had no really good idea where to aim for. I remember a time when I was in training for the company and I was around 135, maybe. But I also had next to no upper body muscle and was pretty much doing nothing but ab work and dancing, so I'm not uber-thrilled with the body I had then and would rather have a leaner, more muscular look. So that may add to the pound count, I don't know.

Mostly how I determine what I want to weigh is by one simple question:
Can I wear this costume now or not?

Having a baby didn't really change my waist and hip measurements apparently. I'm wearing street clothes now from 2 years before the pregnancy, and costumes that fit before baby still fit (and of course some are now too big, which means I had to have lost extra inches at some point.) Upper body measurements are ... well, negative almost. I no longer have a cup size, which I chalk up to breastfeeding for a year, but it was worth it. And padded bras are no more expensive than regular ones!

After digging out the size 6 jeans and being able to wear them again, I went on a cleaning spree and drug out everything from the drawers and back of the closet that I hadn't worn in a decade, just to see what fit and what didn't. There are 4 items I want to slim down enough to fit back into.

One is a dance shrug/sweater thing, which is net and adorable, and needs a little more room in the arms to fit comfortably. So I need to lose a little more arm fat for that success.

One is a costume with a ridiculously small hip width. I'm actually not sure I ever wore this one without "adjusting" it -- there are some alteration marks at conspicuous places, but I guess my ultimate goal is to fit into that belt. If that doesn't happen, it's not a huge big deal, but I think it's do-able, based on the fact that it looks like I only need an inch, inch-and-a-half more room.

The others are two adorable sweatsuits that my mom got me when I was at my "training" weight, and although they "fit" by dictionary definition, I need to lose a little more inch-wise for them to actually be comfortable to wear.

I found another box of leather skirts and shorts left over from my early 20s. Oddly enough the sizes on those skirts ranged from 4-8, but the 8 was literally 4 inches too small in the hips. My suspicion is that although Baby didn't widen my hips much, LIFE did, and I don't think I'll ever (nor should I hope to) get back into those with a mid 40s body. I thought it was funny that today's 6 is certainly not the 6 of 20 years ago. I knew as much, as the more expensive clothes you buy, the smaller size you wear, but it was bizarre to see HOW much difference there was.

Not that any of these discoveries made me feel bad about myself -- heck, those skirts are 20 years out of date! And I'm not into the retro thing. They are showing a lot of wear, and I deserve new ones.

So yesterday while I was doing my secret shopping jobs for the day (a gig I recently took to help pay for my toy shopping addiction) I stopped by this little place in the strip called "Versona." I thought they just sold junk jewelery, but it turns out I LOVED the clothes they had -- and great prices. Wandering through the sale racks, I found an adorable skirt that would go with just about everything I own -- and when I held it up, it LOOKED like it might fit. but it was sized "Extra Small" and there is just no way on God's green earth, I'm an extra small. I tried it on anyway, just to see how it hung.

The crazy thing FIT!!! It helped that it's a knit. But still -- Wild, huh?

I'm now officially anywhere from a Large to an Extra Small. What a completely useless discovery!

I wore the skirt today. It's clinging to my saddlebags a bit, but I think I look good in it. I refuse to wear Spanx or a girdle, so I'm treasuring my lumpy bits. :)
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  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

AMANDANCES 8/29/2013 8:48AM

    Seriously -- WHY can't I buy pants based on waist circumference and inseam????? WHY !!!!?????? My husband asks, "Do you really have to try on everything in the store?" And I say YES because no one item fits the same way as another one! It's crazy.

Also, I refuse to spend $110 on Lululemon yoga pants JUST so I can say I wear an Extra Small. That is ridiculous. I'll take 6 of the Larges, for $20 a piece thankyouverymuch!

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GETULLY 8/28/2013 5:30PM

    The day that women's designers size by inches (like men's clothes) will be a hallelujah day. It is all over the place with sizes and designers.

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ASTRA58 8/28/2013 11:28AM

    Women's clothes manufacturers are all out to lunch. Practically everything I own is in a different size. Vanity sizing doesn't help, either. I just go by the look now, not by the number on the tag.

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IFDEEVARUNS2 8/28/2013 11:22AM

    So where's the photo????? emoticon

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CHERIJ16 8/28/2013 11:09AM

    You are so right! I can wear 8s and 10s in shorts and pants, but I range from Med. to Lg. to XLg. in tops! It all depends on the brand and the style. Go Figure?

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TRYJESUS2DAY 8/28/2013 10:53AM

    emoticon

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