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    JITZUROE   100,834
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From the other side of the curtain.


Wednesday, August 07, 2013

Back from another stint at the hospital due to pain ruling my world. Good times! Ok, not really. I had to drive myself to the hospital this time and have the valet guy get me wheeled over to the admitting desk (yuck).

Once again I had most of the same nurses and staff caring for me as with my hospital stay from a few weeks prior. During this week-long adventure I was moved to four different rooms. 2 of them were private rooms (score!). But alas, others needed them much more than I did, so I was moved often (highly contagious peeps? Take my room. REALLY!).

Each time my nurses wheeled me down the hall to another room I would say that I was on a magic gurney ride. Especially since on two of those occasions my nurses Ryan and John were trying to wheel me to a private room late at night under the radar -before the charge nurse knew the room was vacant. On those trips I got to go really fast on that magic gurney ride (wahoo!).

I even had the same sweet housekeeping woman often, Ms Chand. This time she brought me an entire vase filled with pretty flowers (beautiful!). Stanford is a huge hospital. I mean BIG. Perhaps my need for dwelling in the cardiac ward cut down the size of staff around me, but I still feel lucky each time I see someone I know there (silly). Shoot, who am I kidding, I AM lucky : )

I had the pleasure of rooming with a lovely lady named Sue halfway through my treatment last week. She started asking me questions about our treatment from the other side of the dividing curtain between us. She hailed from Wine Country out here in CA, and had to be driven over 2 hours to get to Stanford. Like myself, she also tries to exist with chronic debilitating pain.

Sue was so scared, which puzzled me for some reason. Then I realized that this was her first time as a 'guest' in the joint, and she likely did not know the team here as well as myself. We talked when we were able to. See, heavy drugs require nap time and make it challenging to concentrate on things. I tried to keep her focused on the things she loved about Napa to stay occupied since reading was truly NOT an option while on this drug (words just don't seem to come together right when reading). I would ask her every so often how she was doing or offer to chat her up when I could hear her crying. : (
For some reason I felt so strongly that I was EXACTLY where I was meant to be for those couple of days with Sue. I feel lucky to have been on the receiving end of her sharing with me, even if it was from the other side of a hospital curtain. I hope that I was able to give her some comfort, and feel very humbled by that opportunity.

Sue came over to say goodbye as I drifted off to sleep. She was going home. I gave her my email and told her that I would be expecting her to stay in touch so that I could hear about how she was miraculously cured of her pain someday : )

'Nuff said.
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  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

CTUPTON 12/16/2013 4:06PM

    When my husband was in rehap last dummer there was a man who thought kind of like you do. He had a major leg problem but he spent his time helping others and cheering them up. What a great attitude you have. Sue was lucky to have you to calm her down. chris emoticon

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TRENTDREAMER 8/9/2013 5:27PM

    "Each time my nurses wheeled me down the hall to another room I would say that I was on a magic gurney ride. "
* 2 funny!

" On those trips I got to go really fast on that magic gurney ride (wahoo!). "
* #wahoo indeed

"but I still feel lucky each time I see someone I know there (silly). Shoot, who am I kidding, I AM lucky : )"
* familiarity can take some of the stress away

"I hope that I was able to give her some comfort, and feel very humbled by that opportunity. "
* :)


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KAILYNSTAR 8/9/2013 4:38PM

    There are times, when a person is just there for the right person and situation. You are always there for the great times and support, you are famous for. I'm glad that Sue had someone there for support. I'm glad you found Sue.

Hang in there Bren.
emoticon

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JCARDINAL 8/9/2013 12:29PM

    Bren, you're my hero!! I truly mean it. You seem to find the good in every situation. When I'm struggling with my own pain issues I think of you and it helps me stay positive. emoticon emoticon emoticon

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_RAMONA 8/7/2013 3:24PM

    emoticon

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KIKKI-G 8/7/2013 12:19PM

    That's amazing that you had a sense of purpose to bring someone else comfort & happiness. You are one strong lady & you will get through this on top
xo

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SARAWALKS 8/7/2013 11:06AM

    emoticon emoticon emoticon
Isn't it amazing how good can come out of Really Bad?
You are a blessing and one of these days I know we're going to hear about YOU being miraculously cured...at least I'm praying for that.
emoticon emoticon emoticon emoticon emoticon

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KNYAGENYA 8/7/2013 11:04AM

    emoticon It was so nice of you to be there for someone else!

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MAMADWARF 8/7/2013 10:44AM

    I love you Bren...even in the midst of your pain, you offer comfort to others. You are an incredible, loving person. I'm sure you meant the world to her....feel better, babe.

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