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Hammock Day

Monday, July 22, 2013

Hammock Day



When: Always on July 22nd.

Summer is in full swing. It's time to slow down and to relax. During the Dog Days of summer (and all of the other summer days, too), there is no better place to slow down and relax, than on a hammock.

Hammock Day is appropriately celebrated right in the middle of the Dog Days of summer (July 3 though August 11th.

Hammock Day exists to enjoy summer as it should be enjoyed. People celebrate Hammock Day by spending as much time relaxing on it as possible. Getting out of your hammock to get a snack, or your favorite summer beverage is okay. But, it is not a day for work. Cutting the lawn is forbidden on this day.

The roots of Hammock Day and Hammock Day history is largely unknown. Maybe the originator was too busy napping on his or her hammock!?!



More Information:
History of the Hammock
www.ecomall.com/greensho
pping/hammock.htm


This Day in History July 22nd.

First Crusade: Godfrey of Bouillon is elected the first Defender of the Holy Sepulchre of The Kingdom of Jerusalem. (1099)

Wars of Scottish Independence: Battle of Falkirk – King Edward I of England and his longbowmen defeat William Wallace and his Scottish schiltrons outside the town of Falkirk.
(1298)

Colony of Roanoke: a second group of English settlers arrives on Roanoke Island off North Carolina to re-establish the deserted colony. (1587)

Albany, New York is formally chartered as a municipality by Governor Thomas Dongan. (1686)

The Acts of Union 1707 are agreed upon by commissioners from the Kingdom of England and the Kingdom of Scotland, which, when passed by each countries' Parliaments, lead to the creation of the Kingdom of Great Britain. (1706)

Alexander Mackenzie reaches the Pacific Ocean becoming the first recorded human to complete a transcontinental crossing of Canada. (1793)

Surveyors of the Connecticut Land Company name an area in Ohio "Cleveland" after Gen. Moses Cleaveland, the superintendent of the surveying party. (1796)

Battle of Santa Cruz de Tenerife: Battle between Spanish and British naval forces during the French Revolutionary Wars. During the Battle, Rear-Admiral Nelson is wounded in the arm and the arm had to be partially amputated. (1797)

American Civil War: Battle of Atlanta – outside Atlanta, Georgia, Confederate General John Bell Hood leads an unsuccessful attack on Union troops under General William T. Sherman on Bald Hill. (1864)

The first ever motor race is held in France between the cities of Paris and Rouen. The fastest finisher was the Comte Jules-Albert de Dion, but The 'official' victory was awarded to Albert Lemaître driving his 3 hp petrol engined Peugeot. (1894)

In San Francisco, California, a bomb explodes on Market Street during a Preparedness Day parade killing 10 and injuring 40. (1916)

Wiley Post becomes the first person to fly solo around the world traveling 15,596 miles (25,099 km) in 7 days, 18 hours and 45 minutes. (1933)

Outside Chicago's Biograph Theater, "Public Enemy No. 1" John Dillinger is mortally wounded by FBI agents. (1934)

New Deal: the United States Senate votes down President Franklin D. Roosevelt's proposal to add more justices to the Supreme Court of the United States. (1937)

The United States government begins compulsory civilian gasoline rationing due to the wartime demands. (1942)

Holocaust: the systematic deportation of Jews from the Warsaw Ghetto begins. (1942)

World War II: Allied forces capture the Italian city of Palermo. (1943)

Dezik and Tsygan are the first dogs to make a sub-orbital flight. (1951)

Mariner program: Mariner 1 spacecraft flies erratically several minutes after launch and has to be destroyed. (1962)

An act of Congress restores Civil War Confederate General Robert E. Lee's citizenship. (1975)

Jeffrey Dahmer is arrested in Milwaukee after police discover human remains in his apartment. (1991)

Members of 101st Airborne of the United States, aided by Special Forces, attack a compound in Iraq, killing Saddam Hussein's sons Uday and Qusay, along with Mustapha Hussein, Qusay's 14-year old son, and a bodyguard. (2003)

Norway is the victim of twin terror attacks, the first being a bomb blast which targeted government buildings in central Oslo, the second being a massacre at a youth camp on the island of Utøya. (2011)
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  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

PATRICIAAK 7/23/2013 1:24AM

    Have only been in a hammock a couple times.

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PMAY0313 7/22/2013 3:46PM

    emoticon

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MARTYLYNN1 7/22/2013 2:49PM

    A hammock would be nice.

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PICKIE98 7/22/2013 2:20PM

    I wish I had a hammock!! My dream is one of those big macrame` ones... when I retire I am getting one..

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HANSBRINK 7/22/2013 12:37PM

  I always thought hammocks were bad on your back. Oh well.

-- =====

Thanks for the "This Day in History" entries.

"The United States government begins compulsory civilian gasoline rationing due to the wartime demands. (1942) "

I remember gas rationing from the 70's too. Long lines of cars waiting to fuel up. Odd / even days.

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LOSER05 7/22/2013 10:35AM

    nice

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SONYALATRECE 7/22/2013 9:08AM

    Love it!
Gotta get one of those hammocks!

Sonya

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