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    VHALKYRIE   16,233
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What We Can Learn From Superman

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Some time ago I wrote about celebrity diets. With exercise and specialized diets from professional trainers, actors and actress can change their shape from super slim to super buff.

The newest actor to undergo this transformation is Henry Cavill as the "Man of Steel". Here's a snippet of how he trained to be invincible (or at least look that way):

moviebody.com/henry-cavi
ll-workout-routine


Basically, lifting weights and eating all day.

Since it is his job to be perfectly sculpted, he gets the benefit of time and training to work on his body. He has someone to tell him 'lift this' and 'eat that.' Most of us don't have that kind of specialized help, but there is something we can learn from this.

"Eat less, move more" seems to make intuitive sense, but it is not quite right.

If you look at how actors drastically change their body shape, "eat less, move more" is rarely one of them. (Except in case of "Black Swan" where Natalie Portman and Mila Kunis ate almost nothing by their accounts). Christian Bale and Henry Cavill lifted more, and ate more for their roles in "Batman" and "Man of Steel" respectively. A lot more.

If the linked article is to be believed, then Cavill worked out 1-2 hours per day with heavy kettlebell lifts. He ate between 3,500-5,000 calories per day.

Think this is just for men? If you watch the National Guard promo video about halfway down the page, you'll see the actress who plays Ursa is doing the EXACT same workout as Cavill. She cannot lift the same amount of weight as Cavill, obviously, but she is doing the same TYPE of exercises. Men lift weights and girls jog is sooooo outdated 1980s thinking.



We are all familiar with someone who spends hours upon hours on a treadmill. They diligently adhere to a 1,200 calorie diet. You see them week after week, and their body doesn't seem to change much despite all that hard work.

Yeah, that was me. Been there, done that, got the t-shirt.

Henry Cavill trained for 1-2 hours of lifting, and ate 3,500-5,000 calories per day. He looks like an Adonis.



Again, Antje Traue (Ursa) trained the same way as Cavill. Not exactly a bikini shot, but the armor is pretty darn form fitting.



If that's what it takes to look like a gilded god or goddess, what does running on a treadmill for hours and skimping on meals do?
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  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

THINRONNA 6/23/2013 1:54PM

    Nice blog! You always give me something to think about!

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BTVMADS 6/20/2013 8:58PM

    Whenever I read about athletes or celebrities who eat 4000+ calories in a day, all I can think is, "HOW? How do you consume that much food??" Dean Karnazes claims that when he runs daily marathons/ trains for ultras, he eats between 5 and 7 THOUSAND calories a day... He's Paleo now, but used to eat entire pizzas while running Ultras. When I run more than 10 miles, the mere thought of food makes me nauseated -- there's a reason I sucked down gels during long runs instead of trying to eat solids, lol. Granted, the celebrities you're writing about aren't eating huge quantities of food in the middle of a workout, but they're still having to find time (and space in their stomachs!) to shovel it all down. I'd love to see what they're eating, because I just can't imagine that much food outside of Thanksgiving.

As an aside: 3 hours of muscle-shredding workouts and super calorie-dense foods? These folks must sleep like logs.

I know, these aren't very intelligent comments, but it's what I think of whenever I read this stuff!

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CBLENS 6/20/2013 6:44AM

    At the gym I have noticed the "beefy" ones; both guys & gals are the ones who concentrate on strength more so than cardio. emoticon

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VHALKYRIE 6/19/2013 3:29PM

    Thanks for your viewpoint, SOUTHGOINGZAX! That reminds me about an article I read concerning very high intensity cardio INCREASING risk of all cause mortality. I forgot about it, but you just reminded me about it. I'll write about it soon.

Comment edited on: 6/19/2013 3:31:54 PM

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SOUTHGOINGZAX 6/19/2013 3:22PM

    I love the logic...but this is something I honestly feel kind of conflicted about - what about all the studies that show a high-protein diet is linked to many common forms of cancer? And that people who eat high-protein diets have a shorter life-expectancy and are at greater risk for things like diabetes and alzheimer's? Additional studies have shown that slowing down the rate at which your cells rebuild reduces the risk of genetic mutations that lead to cancer - higher metabolisms, and higher-protein diets speed up the cellular regeneration rate, thus increasing your risk....

I'm not trying to be a downer, at all - I am a super-fan of looking buff and working out as hard as possible - I'm honestly not sure what the best course of action is in order to stay healthy in the long term - or even, if there is one answer that fits everyone. It seems like the information is conflicting - you either do low impact and/or long-duration cardio exercise and eat a calorie-restrictive, low protein, plant-based diet to live a long time and reduce your risk of cancer, or you do high intensity workouts, eat lots of protein, gain muscle, and look AWESOME, but shorten your life-span by doing so.

What is the difference between "healthy" defined as looking awesome (translation: guilded god-like due to high-intensity workouts that build muscle, increase metabolism, and burn off fat), and "healthy" as defined as being a a low risk for cancer, heart disease, diabetes, alzheimer's, etc?

Is it really a quality vs. quantity dilemma?

Right now, I am choosing quality. I love my high-intensity workouts and the muscles I have because of them. But will I still think that was the right choice 20 years from now?

Anyway, just my rambling thoughts. I appreciate the blog! (and the pictures of Cavill ;)



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NAYPOOIE 6/19/2013 12:12PM

    Good thought. Only problem is, I don't want to eat more.

Of course, I'm not exercising at the moment. Maybe appetite would step up if I started pumping some iron.

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BILL60 6/19/2013 10:10AM

    Keep on dreaming, GETSTRONGRRR.

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GETSTRONGRRR 6/18/2013 9:41PM

    I'm with you....and Henry Cavill (people confuse us all the time....I tell them, "I'm bald, Henry has the full head of hair!")

I ran....a lot....for years...lot's of marathons.....tons of halfs and 5Ks.

My body didn't change too much....some, but not a lot. I also ate a lot....of carbs

3 years ago, I stopped running and started lifting. Cardio became shorter, but more intense (mostly biking). I lost 4 inches in the waist and about 20 lbs.....oh, and I cut out a lot of carbs....and added a lot of protein.

Oh, I guess the only other difference between Henry and I is that I'm clean shaven and he sports a beard
emoticon emoticon emoticon

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