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    ZENRYAKU   53,285
SparkPoints
50,000-59,999 SparkPoints
 
 
give or take 5%

Tuesday, May 07, 2013

"... based on current research, the definition of successful long-term weight loss is being able to maintain a weight loss of 5% of your starting body weight for more than a year." from theconversation.com/you-
dont-have-to-be-the-bigges
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loss-success-11587


Ok, I am a success emoticon because I lost 8.25% of my initial starting weight!

Now I didn't start off with the goal of "Australia’s National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) draft guidelines for the management of overweight and obesity recommend starting with a more modest weight loss goal of 5% or 5kg, whichever is higher." But having lost 7kg and maintained this loss, I'm ready for the next 5% emoticon

The article never mentioned "diet". Like SparkPeople, "... long-term weight loss depends on long-term lifestyle changes." emoticon
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  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

WENDYJM4 5/7/2013 11:32PM

    emoticon emoticon emoticon emoticon mm

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BROOKLYN_BORN 5/7/2013 2:11PM

    I'm a great believer in setting your own personal goals and definition of success. BUT, after losing 25 lbs (starting at 157), if I returned to 150, I wouldn't consider myself a success at all.

At the other end of the spectrum, a 400 lb man would be considered a success if he returned to 380? He would still be morbidly obese, wouldn't he?

I like your attitude. After the initial % weight loss success, move on to the next success level. So if the hypothetical 400 lb man considered 20 lbs his first target and proceeded from there, I would say that’s a success indeed.

I definitely agree with the article’s point about setting a “reasonable” target for initial weight loss (10%). Unrealistic expectations cause unnecessary discouragement.


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