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    ANASARI   3,190
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Potpourri of procrastination


Saturday, May 04, 2013

When I first began a blog as a sideline, prior to SparkPeople, I kept a draft email around to add all my ideas, recipes, interesting links, etc. to use as fodder for the blog as I got around to fleshing them out. Some of the items on there have been around for a very long time, and I never followed up, so it's time to put them all into a single post, in order to help turn out some new space for thoughts and ideas... here they are, in no particular order.

(Incidentally, my real task tonight is to work out next week's menu plan, which I usually look forward to doing, but for some reason tonight I seem to be looking for ways to avoid it. I don't know why that is, but after I finally post at least *something,* I plan to give it my full attention, and figure out what is holding me back this time. Until then... :)

- Missing days: Not all of us have them, though I have a couple of days in my early 30s that I can't remember parts of *grin*. However, some famous personages actually have a single or several episodes of missing days. Among them are Agatha Christie
( historicmysteries.com/di
sappearance-of-agatha-chri
stie/
)
and Geoffrey Chaucer ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ge
offrey_Chaucer#Life
).

Chaucer's missing period was integrated into one film I really enjoy, "A Knight's Tale," where the speculation was that he was off gambling (and losing) during that time, sort of on a walkabout. I liked that spin on it, though the article says he was eventually found murdered. If you get a chance to watch, definitely check out special features on the DVD for more of Chaucer.

- Aphrodisiacs: Intriguing herbal benefits from the rainforest: listverse.com/2011/06/06
/top-10-rainforest-aphrodi
siacs/
.

- Schizo link: There's now been a tentative scientific link made between schizophrenia and wheat consumption/gluten intolerance: www.psychologytoday.com/
print/57768?page=2
.

- Blue in nature is a pretty dangerous color, unless it's the sky or the sea. Kinda weird, when you think about it, since blue is so universally loved (I believe it's the most popular color at an amazing 40% of people preferring it). Some blue things you should avoid:
Blue Krait snake and Belcher's sea snake listverse.com/2011/03/30
/top-10-most-venomous-snakes/

Blue-ringed octopus listverse.com/2007/12/05
/top-15-unusual-deep-sea-c
reatures/

Blue Dart Frog www.aqua.org/animals_blu
epoisondartfrog.html

Blue-bottle, Portugese man of war library.thinkquest.org/C
007974/2_1bbo.htm

Puffer fish and Box jellyfish www.worldsmostunique.com
/worldsmostpoisonous.html

Polythoa coral and Blue spotted stingray nerdygaga.com/830/freaky
-venomous-water-creatures/


- The Myth of 5 Senses: "We have five body senses sight, hearing, touch, smell, taste. These are the traditional five senses, but there are in fact many more some say up to 21. Obvious additions to the list are balance, pain, and temperature. Furthermore, we have internal senses which traditionally number four: imagination, memory, common sense (not to be confused with commonsense, which many people lack!), and the estimative power. Wikipedia has a very interesting article which covers the large number of senses seldom mentioned." You can read more at the below link:
listverse.com/2009/11/23
/yet-another-10-commonly-b
elieved-myths/


- Ailments and consistency: Did you ever stop to consider that nobody can "show" you what heartburn feels like? We just take it for granted that, when we experience particular symptoms, that's what it is - but how do we know it's the same thing that everyone else actually feels? In fact, for many things, you don't even know what they are when they first happen to you, because you are unfamiliar with the symptoms (I imagine hemorrhoids manifest this confusion if you get them); you don't know until later that the strange ailment you got was this thing that many people get, and it's called such-and-so. Even then, how do you know unless diagnosed by a doctor that what you have is what everyone else has? I can't imagine how confusing this must have been, back in bygone days, when there were fewer resources available to tell you what was wrong with you. It must have felt really lonely and frightening to have some weird dis-ease and not know what to expect.

- The Sphinx: One of my favorite subjects/mysteries. Old theory, new data -- click here:
www.newdawnmagazine.com/
articles/what-was-the-sphinx
. Cool!!
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  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

WOUBBIE 5/5/2013 12:11PM

    Mark Sanford! Bwahahahahahaha!!!!!

Sorry, I DO feel bad for his poor family, but really,

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MAYBER 5/5/2013 9:53AM

    Thanks for sharing thought Interesting
One day at a time
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NELLJONES 5/5/2013 8:08AM

    Or a contrived missing period like Mark Sanford's "hike on the Appalachian Trail".

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ANASARI 5/5/2013 4:08AM

    Thanks, Honouria! :)

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HONOURIA 5/5/2013 1:03AM

    There is some speculation that Agatha's disappearance was romantic in nature. I believe they did a movie or book on that subject.

The link between autism and wheat has received some press as I have come across it. In fact I know someone with that condition who gets unwell eating gluten.

Wild and wonderful creatures - but you are right about blue. It seems to be a soothing colour, but a danger in the creature world, especially with regard to us in any event.

The artifacts in Egypt and large arrangements elsewhere in the world are real mysteries. Fascinating for speculators.

What an interesting amalgamation of material.

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