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The Blood Sugar Solution-Foods


Sunday, April 07, 2013

What makes certain foods addictive?
1. Sugar stimulates the brain’s pleasure or reward centers through the neurotransmitter dopamine.
2. Brain Imaging (PET scans) shows that high-sugar and high-fat foods work like heroin, opium and morphine in the brain.
3. Obese people and drug addicts have lower numbers of dopamine receptors, making them more likely to crave things that books dopamine.
4. Foods high in fat and sweets stimulate the release of the body’s own opoids (chemicals like morphine) in the brain.
5. People (and rats) develop a tolerance to sugar-they need more and more of the substance to satisfy them. (Also true of alcohol or heroin).
6. Animals and humans experience withdrawal when suddenly cut off from sugar. Just like drugs, after an initial period of “enjoyment” of the food withdrawal can come.
Liquid sugar calories are the most addictive food in our diet. It is the single biggest source of added sugar. Sugar-sweetened drinks are bad for us because:
• Empty calories keep us from eating healthy foods.
• From 1977-2002, the consumption of calories in sugar-sweetened beverages doubled and is the main source of added sugar in our diet.
• Obesity rates doubled during that period in children 2-11 and tripled in adolescents 12-19.
• More than 90% of American children & teens drink soda every day.
• Women who drink 1 sugar sweetened soft drink have an 82% higher risk of developing diabetes over 4 years.
• Other studies link sugar-sweetened drinks to pre-diabetes, diabetes and heart disease.
• Sugar sweetened drinks lead to weight gain.
When you drink your calories, you don’t feel full, so you eat more. If a person drinks water instead of 1 soda a day, he or she would consume 225 fewer calories a day. In a year, that is 82,123 fewer calories or 24 pounds a year. Drink water! Chill it, filter it! Add lemon or lime to it!
The only studies that have had any different findings were funded by the food industry. Interesting isn’t it?
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Member Comments About This Blog Post:
STALEYK 4/11/2013 5:56AM

    I too have given up sugared drinks. Once in a great while I will have a soft drink but very rarely. It's water and tea for me.

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DS9KIE 4/7/2013 10:17PM

    wow its a good thing I mostly drink water, I only drink pop when I'm at the movies.

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MJ7DM33 4/7/2013 10:00PM

  Very informative blog! Thx!

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GRAMMYEAC 4/7/2013 7:16PM

    Interesting facts! Great blog about the chemical responses we have to sugar and fats!

Thank you!

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LOOKINGUP2012 4/7/2013 11:20AM

    emoticon emoticon

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1CRAZYDOG 4/7/2013 10:15AM

    And don't think using artificial sweeteners (like Aspartame) gets you "off the hook" where sugar is concerned. I stimulates that craving for more sweet!

It IS difficult to give up sugar, salt and fat!

HUGS and thanks for the blog.

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WORKNPROGRESS49 4/7/2013 10:11AM

    emoticon info emoticon

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JOANIE69 4/7/2013 9:44AM

    I can certainly relate to your blog today! I was OFF sweets for Lent, (sugar-laden ones), and when Easter came and we also celebrated my BD, I was back onto them with a vengence. The downside was that I re-gained a half pound last week, and when you lose slowly like I do (hypothyroid= lifelong slow metabolism that worsens with age, for us all), even a half pound means another 5 -7 days to get it back off. I knew about sugar's addictive powers, but this info really hits hard anyway. Thankfully I do not drink sugary juice drinks or sodas. I think that pop is worse than dry wine on our health, if one can keep the wine down to 1 glass a day that is. (I don't drink alcohol either.)
emoticon for sharing this interesting, needful information. emoticon

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SANDRALEET 4/7/2013 8:26AM

    eat only real food in moderation

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KANOE10 4/7/2013 8:25AM

    Great informational blog. Thanks for sharing. I totally believe in sugar addiction and stay away from sugar as much as possible.



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NELLJONES 4/7/2013 8:09AM

    Having been through alcohol withdrawal, trust me, withdrawing from fat and sugar is not the same. No DTs, no hallucinations, no insomnia. When I joined WW I was given a list of what I could eat and what I couldn't, and I stuck to it. Of course I wanted my Cheetos and my Reeses, but I didn't eat them, and I didn't need to be hospitalized for the withdrawal. We can do it, but it isn't easy. Was I looking for easy or was I looking for thin? I decided the answer was thin, so I did it, and I do it to this day.

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TORTISE110 4/7/2013 7:12AM

    Good review!

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