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    KA_JUN   55,667
SparkPoints
50,000-59,999 SparkPoints
 
 

Target: 100+ miles


Thursday, February 14, 2013

So the following communique came down the pipe...

" We’re riding from Homestead to Ohiopyle and back in May... We’ll ride out at 6am to Ohiopyle, grab lunch, and ride home. Dinner and celebratory beers at D’s. Join us and do all of it or some of it. It’ll be 0-135 miles. We plan to keep up a 15mph pace. No entry fee, no insurance, no waiver, no SAG wagon. Just a bike and a trail."

I am, shall we say, intrigued. These guys are planning on doing this ride out and back on the Great Allegheny Passage as a training ride for a longer event they're doing later this year.

I floated the test balloon idea past the DW, and she seemed amenable. Hmmmmm.

I have had the goal of riding a century for a while, but haven't committed the time and resources to complete one. 2012's long ride was a metric century at a pace of 12.38mph over a course that is much more rigorous than the GAP.

The GAP elevation chart indicates that the maximum grade is 1.5%.



For comparison, the elevation profile for the metric century I rode looked like this.



Mileage would be in the neighborhood of 136 miles, plus mileage to and from the trail head in Homestead. Approximate projected ride time averaging 15mph would be 6:40:00, not including pit stops/lunch. 2012 long ride, the metric century, took me 5:27:59 hours. Roughly an extra hour of saddle time, assuming I can generate the power and sustain my speed to keep up and barring unforeseen hurdles. Doable.

www.atatrail.org/tmi/mil
eage.cfm


I know these guys are fast, so if I were to get dropped or had a major mechanical, it's not like I couldn't finish getting home or call for a bailout.

www.atatrail.org/tmi/map
s.cfm


Opportunity knocks.

Like how I ended up running my first 5K, a window has opened, it's up to me to decide how to react. I've already begun boning up on my reading and research.
www.sparkpeople.com/mypa
ge_public_journal_individu
al.asp?blog_id=5011598


All right, then, bring it! Let's go! www.youtube.com/watch?v=
tbNlMtqrYS0


Time to get uncomfortable.

Edit: Huh. I guess if I complete this ride, it would be an unofficial brevet. Would that make me a unintentional randonneur? Interesting.

www.rusa.org/faq1.html

"What is a "randonneur"?
There is no direct English translation of the French term "randonnée", which loosely means to go on a long trip, tour, outing, or ramble, usually on foot or on a bicycle, along a defined route. A person who goes on a "randonnée" is called a "randonneur". (The correct French term for a female participant is "randonneuse", but such distinctions are often lost in America, where we tend to lump everyone together). In cycling, it means a hard-riding enthusiast who is trying to complete a long randonnée inside a certain time allotment. Note that a randonnée is not a race. Overall, about the only thing being first earns is some bragging rights. It is not uncommon for the last finishers to get as much applause as anyone else. Indeed, there is much camaraderie in randonneuring. One does it to test oneself against the clock, the weather, and a challenging route - but not to beat the other riders.
In comparison to other forms of competitive long-distance cycling, such as at the Race Across America (RAAM), where there are following cars with crews supporting the riders every inch of the way, randonneuring stresses self-sufficiency. Help can only be given at the checkpoints along the route, so support crews (if there are any) must leapfrog the rider. Any rider caught receiving assistance from a support crew in-between checkpoints (or, "contrôles" as they are commonly called) will be subject to a time penalty, or even disqualification. Randonneurs are free to buy food, supplies, or bike repairs at any stores they encounter along the route. Once riders have successfully completed a 200-kilometer "brevet", they are entitled to be called a "randonneur" or "randonneuse". "
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  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

MICHELLEPHANT 2/18/2013 1:49PM

    Dude! Now THAT is a goal! Kick names n take butt!
emoticon emoticon emoticon

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MEGA_MILES 2/16/2013 1:19AM

    Go for it! emoticon

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UWHK8STER 2/15/2013 9:06AM

    Good luck in your training! It sounds like you have a couple of backup plans listed should the ride not go according to plan, so that's good. But major kudos to you - I can't even think about going 1/3 that distance in one day!

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AEROBISAURUS 2/15/2013 8:38AM

    The Proclaimers! Lol! Love it :) emoticon Better get started! You're the man! emoticon

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BILL60 2/15/2013 7:40AM

    Sounds like a good challenge. The amount of hurt afterwards will be dictated by the amount of preparation. Good luck!!

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LOLABLACK69 2/15/2013 1:21AM

    Whoaaaa... Sounds really uncomfortable... emoticon
Go for it! emoticon emoticon emoticon

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RESIPSA99 2/15/2013 12:19AM

    You should definitely go for it! I still haven't don't my "true" century (quite a few metrics, tho), but I hope to do so this summer if my back holds up. The idea that you aren't too far from home if you get a mechanical is good (you're NOT going to get dropped!! ;-P).

Thanks for your comment, btw. I'm full into studying for my exam, so my focus is on that and keeping up my workouts, but I have not been tracking as there is only so much time in the day. Two weeks to go and then it is back to normality (or semi normality, anyway!).

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PAPASMURF1957 2/14/2013 10:56PM

    emoticon

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MARIAJESTRADA 2/14/2013 10:45PM

    Over 100 miles in one day? Wow! emoticon You can do it, and your wife is a rock star. Sounds like you're all better too!

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