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    RHOADAN   38,712
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Experiment with Low Carb Quick Bread

Monday, September 17, 2012

I've been exploring a lot of low carb food websites lately. Many of them have a number of gluten free baked goods due to nut meals and coconut flour being easy low carb flour substitutions. Mind you, this works better for quick breads than yeasted breads.

Anyway, I found a recipe for a simple white quick bread here. www.sugarfreelowcarbreci
pes.com/?p=3044


I thought I'd give it a try. I will admit to being a bit puzzled by this sentence: "Eggs were used for leavening, but I suppose baking powder or soda could be added to make a lighter bread." Is there anyone here who can explain how eggs work as leavening, especially if you don't separate them and whisk the whites into peaks?

I do know how quick breads are normally leavened. It involves an acid-base reaction producing lots of teeny tiny bubbles. Baking soda is a base and requires a corresponding acid, e.g. buttermilk or cream of tartar, in order to do anything. Baking powder combines both acid and base in one powder and can act as a leavening agent by itself . If comments weren't closed on the original article, I'd point out over there that I don't think baking soda would work to lighten this bread because I don't see any obvious acids in the original ingredient list.

Now, I thought that the bread in the photos accompanying the original article looked awfully flat, so when I made my bread, I added a tablespoon of baking powder. Here's the results:


This is the batter after I put it in the loaf pan.


This is the finished loaf. I really wish I'd gotten a picture of it before I dumped it out of the pan so I could show just how much it rose thanks to the baking powder.


This is the first slice off the finished loaf. As you can see, it's noticeably taller than the slices on the original site.

I used my Ninja Master Prep to mix the ingredients. It worked really well once I figured out that I need to use the large container.
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  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

RHOADAN 9/17/2012 11:42PM

    As is, it doesn't have much flavor, but then again, the original recipe is intended to be a readily modified base for flavored breads, so that's not necessarily a bad thing. It's certainly sturdy enough to stand up to whatever you want to put on it, and plenty moist.

Next time I'll add some Italian seasonings and possibly a strongly flavored cheese. I also want to do a seeded variation with crunch.

Comment edited on: 9/17/2012 11:44:01 PM

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AMANDA_YVONNE 9/17/2012 5:04PM

    How did it taste?

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ERIN1957 9/17/2012 4:06PM

    Yours does look better than theirs. Many low carb breads call of eggs, just part of the food I guess....we LC love eggs and the wonderful fats and proteins they give us.

I have made flax breads before but never a white loaf. My family will like this.

Thank you so much!

~Erin

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RHOADAN 9/17/2012 1:07PM

    I've done my share of baking pre-low carb, mostly sourdough breads. I also did the occasional yeasted bread (Laurel's Kitchen Loaf for Learning, yay). Quick breads were pretty much confined to corn bread. although that banana pumpkin bread in the previous post was a quick bread. I like Southern corn bread, the kind with no added sugar.

Actually, I suspect that real function of the large number of eggs is to give the bread cohesion. A bread made with wheat flour would get its cohesion from the gluten, but this is a gluten free bread and I don't think the small amount of xanthan (or in this case, guar) gum is enough to make up for the lack..

The texture of the finished loaf reminded me of pound cake. Chasing down information on that gave me fodder for another blog post.

Comment edited on: 9/17/2012 1:08:52 PM

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-LINDA_S 9/17/2012 10:55AM

    Aha! You sound like a baker! I get what you mean. I don't see any acid, either, and I agree about the eggs, at least unless they're really whipped up. Seems like a lot of eggs if they're not doing the leavening. I wonder if you need them all if you add baking powder, but I guess they contribute moisture. Anyway, your bread looks great!

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1CRAZYDOG 9/17/2012 7:59AM

    Hmmmm.....yup. Couldn't explain @ all how eggs could act as a leavening agent nor soda could lighten the bread. Your bread looks scrumptious!!!

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HOTPINKCAMARO49 9/17/2012 3:50AM

  emoticon You go, girl! emoticon emoticon

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