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    MEDDYPEDDY   139,826
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80 Quoting another blog...

Saturday, September 08, 2012

..and I have not gotten the permission but I would think it is ok. This is spark friend sue writing about her weight story and this part I find particulary interesting:

"...and with the healthy lifestyle living in sweden (car stood parked all week long, walking everywhere, plus we had a dog who demanded her daily walks), weight was never a concern even after huge weight gains (50% of my body weight) with two pregnancies.

then we moved back to the US in 1983, in my early 30s, and the roller coaster began. the first time i hit 112, made it back to 113, right after we moved..."

I have seen this very often in exchange students - they go for USA for a year and come back at double size... and when they come come they shrink back to what they were before they left in six moths or so.

This is probably known to all of us - but I tend to forget it. I tend to blame me, me, me - it is only me doing wrong and of course it IS me putting too many calories in my mouth.

But I have to pay more attention to circumstances - how is my environment? The ideal is a healthy environment and a healhy lifestyle. Then I can have an unhealthy environment but still have a healthy lifestyle - but it will be harder... and I can hae a healthy enironment and an unhealthy lifestyle... with those students it might not only been the axcess to more fattening foods it might also been longing for home but still...

My brother has gotten the idea to write a book about losing wight without dieting...I don´t know wether to laugh or cry but I should probably just let it go and say "you do that" but anyway...talking to me about it he told me the nobe-prizewinning discovery that it is not about diet it is about lifestyle...wow brother, who could have guessed?? (Irony, if that is not clear) Ok so I am a little annoyed and I admit to giving him a little lecture about my findings in the matter ... and the good thing was that I was reminded of my alcohol "story" - that I tried for a rather long time to control my alcohol intake in different ways because I thought I was going in the wrong direction. Only drinking at weekends, only drinking expensive wines, never drinking alone, only having one glass... many strategies that all crackled and ended with me having about the same consumption as before I started trying to decrease it.

And when I finally decided that I had to give it up entirely, I did so by changing lifestyle. Hubby had dumped me and that helped because the "wining and dining" or sharing a bottle friday night was not an issue anymore. I socialised with friends during daytime and we did things - going on excursions, looking at stuff, bringing kids along and having picknicks...I stopped eating french cheese for a while, I stopped cooking food that needs wine to be really good (today I think the same food is great without food, as is french cheese)

Doing that made giving up alcohol so easy, I never had to fight at all. It is a lot harder to do with food and the only thing that I see can be changed is evening habits. Crashing in the sofa is not that good because cravings come and I have no energy for anything exept for eating. I have tried to do other things at night but still - I don´t have the energy and I "need" to watch all that crap on teve because I need to relax... and taking baths or doing handicraft or meditate is not interesting enough to replace that sofacrash...keeping my hands occupied in sofa I tried - knitting is okay but hard to keep up. Hula hooping in front of teve I also tried but I have a hard time to be consistent with that.

In AA there is a belief that "whiteknuckling" your way to soberness will not work that good, you have to find what comes easy to you. I did that but how to do it with food is still a mystery. So I will have to come up with some strategies and try them out... which is perfect to combine with my "Lean" experiment ...which is not going that well, it is hard to make those list.. one good thing has been that I decided to write articles in 24 hours from doing the research/interview... yesterday I was at a pressconference and then had a lot of other things to do before picking up daughter at bus and in the evening I went to a theatre opening night which I was supposed to write a review on for todays paper...and normally that first article would not have been written yesterday because I would have been focusing on getting that review done - but yesterday I wrote that first one (and thus left the house uncleaned but I think I did the right choice) and then picked daughter up, went to theatre and then to office writing that review before returning home...whoohoo it feels good. I even might do some housecleaning today!
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SWEDE_SU 9/9/2012 5:19AM

    oh my! thank you for finding value in my words:-) and i just saw a typo - wrote this while deep in jet lag - i made it back from 112 lbs to 103 lbs that first ride on the weight gain roller coaster.

something else i wrote in that blog, though, also resonates:

- recognizing the difference between diet and lifestyle - if you go on a diet, you eventually go off a diet. if my lifestyle includes the elements that have made SP such a successful tool, i will continue to live a successful weight maintenance lifestyle.

i also had problems with wine; that relaxing glass at the end of a day's work really called to me, probably the way that sitting in front of the tv to relax calls to you. i did stop completely for about a month, then slowly re-introduced - with guests, at restaurants, and occasionally on the "right" occasion at home (a weekend, or a perfect evening to sit and enjoy the sunset in the garden). so far, it is working for me. i've included it in my calories (wine was responsible for much of my weight!). and i've managed to limit to one glass.

the triggers and binging - that was the tough thing to overcome. maybe if you tracked your calories to make sure you have some left over at the end of the day, and found something you enjoyed but did not push you to overeat?

you are working so hard, and you are so aware of all the pieces of the puzzle - you will work it out! oh, as far as making choices about housecleaning - my favorite swedish saying: bättre lite smuts i hörnet än ett rent helvete:-))

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GUITARWOMAN 9/8/2012 7:38PM

    Yes, it is so hard to deal with food, we can't just give it up!

Maybe you shoulkd eally crash and just go to sleep early?

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JOYINKY 9/8/2012 10:29AM

  Relaxing at night and enjoying a snack with TV is important to me too. So I plan for it; usually about 300 calories out of my day. I'm just not into feeling deprived or miserable. It is a lifestyle change. I've focused on finding snack foods I like; but will not binge on. Trigger foods are strange; I've never overeaten on apples, but I have on bananas. Any kind of cracker or chip can trigger a binge but I do fine with pretzel's or popcorn. I like apples, pretzels, popcorn---I think you get the idea. I cannot keep good cheese, ice cream, pizza and the other triggers in the house but there are foods I can safely enjoy. A greek yogurt is often a good choice in the evening too. Find ways to enjoy your evenings safely.

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CHRISTINASP 9/8/2012 9:15AM

    Good for you for getting the writing done in time!

With regard to food: you don't have to quit all foods. Just the junkfood...

Is it just as interesting / attractive to be crashed on the sofa with a few carrots and apples as it is to be crashed on it with - well, whatever food it is you usually eat when you sit there? If it's not then I believe it's not the crashing on the sofa and watching tv that you feel you need but the overeating....
I often try to have a very nice cafeinefree (coffee free, even) 'coffee' drink or a herbal tea that I REALLY like and don't drink everyday, when I watch tv.... Gives me a feeling of indulgence... But then I don't watch a lot of tv.

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KASEYCOFF 9/8/2012 2:41AM

    When I was gainfully employed, Saturday was my housecleaning day - not that the house was all that clean, but the major stuff got done. Now that I'm retired, every day can be housecleaning day - and the house isn't as clean as it was with one designated day out of the week, lol... which is a long-winded way of saying, you're right, writing the review was more important than the housework. And my advice? If the weather's nice today, bike riding, dog-walking, and enjoying the outdoors is more important than housework, too, LOL!

Re sobriety, dieting, and whiteknuckling: I've always thought total abstinence is easier than moderation. I'm not saying to quit drinking is easy - dieting or changing lifestyle isn't 'easy.' When I quit smoking, I quit. I stopped all tobacco, altogether. I'm not claiming there were no lapses (were there ever!) but it was easier in the sense that I didn't have to face dealing with the issue three or four or five times a day, every day. Tobacco isn't required by the body - neither is alcohol. But food IS a necessity, so it's not enough to say 'I will quit eating.' The ironbound control required to determine healthy intake, whether to lose or maintain weight... to ensure proper nutrition with complete vitamins and minerals... to face food - especially if you consider yourselve subject to addictive behaviors with it - in so many situations, from eating alone to dining out with others to events such as holidays and vacations...

I found it easy (in comparison) to bypass the tobacco counter at the store: as long as I didn't buy cigarettes and didn't allow them in my house (the workplace and most public places already banned them) it was easier to avoid temptation. To give up alcohol (which never loomed large for me anyway) was relatively easy as I avoided many places, such as pubs / bars, where the focus was on alcohol, and I didn't have it at home.

But having to restrain myself from overindulging even in healthy foods, like grapes or spaghetti or oatmeal... resisting temptation as I watch a friend dive into a dish of ice cream... yes, that's hard. From where I sit, you have done brilliantly with your alcohol addiction - and you are doing well with your healthy lifestyle, too. It's just that the food intake (and calorie-burning with exercise) is so much more immediate because we have to eat several times a day, each and every day.

One woman's opinion, Meddy...
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