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Should the Schools Send Parents an "Obesity Report Card?"


Monday, September 19, 2011

I was just watching a segment on The Doctors about schools sending report cards to parents telling them what their child's BMI is and telling the parents that their children are obese.

Would you want that? For those of us who were overweight as children, would you have wanted your school to point out the fact that you're overweight?

I think most parents and children know that they're overweight. The kids on the playground point that out daily. Why would you want your child's school to add insult to injury by putting that information on a report card?

Okay, our children are fat. That's a known fact. If the schools want to help, maybe they should start with serving healthy lunches and teaching healthy eating in the class room. Maybe they should bring back physical education?

What do y'all think?
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Member Comments About This Blog Post:
SANDY-RENO 9/19/2011 10:31PM

    First, a lot of schools still have physical education, although it is often now taught by the teacher. I think that they should go back to having an actual PE teacher who is trained specifically in that area. I also agree that school lunches should be improved. Absolutely! However, as soon as the politicians want to start putting money toward education (and things that go with it, such as food), then schools will have the budget to start making healthier foods. I disagree with your comment about schools teaching healthy eating in the classroom, for two reasons. First, they already are and have been. I don't know about you, but I was taught about healthy eating and the Food Pyramid (back when that was the thing...hmmm...funny how our ideas of "healthy" eating seem to keep changing), however, when I would go home, none of that mattered. Which leads me to my second point. The majority of eating goes on at home. Kids cannot go grocery shopping. They cannot determine the menu for the week. And if they complain and tell mom and dad that it's unhealthy? You can almost guarantee that mom and dad will come back with something like "Then you go buy your own food and make your own dinner!" And just how is the child supposed to do that? While I do agree with some of your points, I ultimately believe that you think the school has more power than it does (believe me, all teachers wish we had that much power!) As far as the report card goes? I agree with you, I think there may be a better way to go about it. Unfortunately, many schools are also having to cut and/or limit their school nurses. Report cards would be more cost and time effective in that manner. Whatever is decided, I think we can all agree that something needs to be done. Thanks for sharing your thoughts!

Comment edited on: 9/19/2011 10:33:40 PM

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PRINCESSBEITER 9/19/2011 7:31PM

    Ladnba,

I agree wholeheartedly that parents are the root cause and that they should be involved in fixing the problem. However, I do not think that a report card is the answer. Maybe the school nurse could schedule a private meeting with the parents and discuss ways to help the child lose weight.

I also think that teaching today's children the right way to eat would help prevent the next generation from having the same problems.



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CLAIRE94620 9/19/2011 6:41PM

    I agree the parents and child already know that and receiving an "F" obesity report card is not necessarily going to help. I can just imagine kids comparing report cards commenting on their health and how much more miserable life would be for the failing fat ones. Bring back physical education and continue with public announcements about proper nutrition.

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LADNBA 9/19/2011 5:52PM

    I agree with the physical education and that the schools should serve healthy foods but often the parents are the primary cause for obesity among children. I firmly believe that involving them early on as to how to correct their children's behavior and guiding as to how parents can properly influence their children is a key part of resolving the problem. There are 168 hours in the week but only approximately 35 of those are spent at school. that means that 21% of the time is spent at school but 79% of the time is the responsibility of the home.

Now, I am not a medical professional but a dear friend is a school nurse so I have listened to how this problem nearly always falls back to the home.

Sorry if this sounds preachy because that is not my intent. I do not even have children BUT I was a fat kid and spent the vast majority of my life as a fat human. I wish that my schools had engaged my parents earlier on in how to better guide my eating habits. Neither of my parents were overweight...why did I draw the fat straw?!?!

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