Advertisement -- Learn more about ads on this site.


    WATERMELLEN   76,131
SparkPoints
60,000-79,999 SparkPoints
 
 
Recognizing Thinking Mistakes: Beck Day 26

Thursday, February 24, 2011

This is kinda fun and reminds me of a previous existence when I studied and taught logic! Plus: the "cognitive" dimension is (ahem) intellectually appealing . . . Beck is training the brain, for sure.

So: all of us make predictable errors in our thinking. And of course more so when there is an emotional incentive (excessive attachment to food, so rationalization hunger driven!!) to do so.

The workbook has a handy chart setting out 12 such thinking errors with typical examples.

All or nothing: I'm either perfect at this, or I might as well just give up. This morning I turned off the alarm after a sleepless night and grabbed a few more zzzzs. Which meant I had to delete the preplanned workout from today's fitness tracker. Not perfect: but no giving up, however.

MInd reading: if I don't have dessert at the professional meeting/dinner I'm attending this evening, people will think I'm weird. Actually, probably no one will care or notice -- and if they do, so what.

Dysfunctional rules: such as, can't waste food. For sure I'm planning to waste food tonight. It's a sit-down dinner, I don't know what I will be served, I've tracked in some likely candidates, and I'll be carefully sequestering the portion of whatever to a reasonable size. I can waste food and plan to do just that.

And there are a whole bunch more. Beck suggests that we make additional response cards of the thinking errors that recur most frequently: I'll be paying attention and doing that.

This is a technique which appeals to me, which I believe is highly workable for me, and which will be a useful tool going forward. I'm a logical thinker by training, by personality and by profession. But not so much when it comes to food! I make lots of thinking mistakes in this area of my life. In a light hearted way, this promises to be an amusing exercise with a real pay off.
SHARE
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

SLENDERELLA61 2/24/2011 7:45PM

    Your strength in logic and love of thinking will serve you well, Ellen. This cognitive approach is perfect for you. You can use your strengths to approach food differently -- more like you approach the rest of your life. That you call it amusing is great. You can play it like a game. But as you say, you expect big rewards from it. You'll get them!! So good to see you learning so much and seeing the potential for even more learnings!! Take care, Marsha

Report Inappropriate Comment
TRYINGHARD1948 2/24/2011 7:00PM

    You are doing it Ellen.

Report Inappropriate Comment
CONTENTCHRIS 2/24/2011 5:58PM

    Right on ! as they said in the 70's emoticon

but seriously I so agree we got to go all out ! emoticon

Report Inappropriate Comment
MYYEAR7 2/24/2011 5:46PM

    I really like your blog. I have been "mind reading" for a long time - This reminds me that probably no one really notices - and if they do, who cares? Love it!

Report Inappropriate Comment
CRYSTALJEM 2/24/2011 3:20PM

    Now you've really caught my attention. Paying attention to your beliefs and thoughts. Good job. Can't wait to hear more. Good luck! emoticon

Report Inappropriate Comment
GODS_SERENITY 2/24/2011 10:54AM

    I can relate to the all or nothing! No one will even notice you not eating dessert. If they do like you said, "so what"! Yes, I was in the clean your plate club. I got out of that club fast! Last night I didn't sleep well myself. We just press through don't we? I don't have the workbook. I heard some say it's not worth getting. Your doing great. I enjoy reading your blog!

emoticon

Report Inappropriate Comment

Add Your Comment to the Blog Post


Log in to post a comment.