VHALKYRIE   16,233
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Home Nutritionist and Recovery

Thursday, September 06, 2012

When we are little, our parents are responsible for teaching us how to tie our shoes, dress ourselves, clean up our boo-boos, and how to eat. For the first decade of our lives, our parents are completely responsible for the foods we put in our bodies.

It's interesting to me how as my parents pass from middle age into senior citizens that the role has changed.

After my dad's surgery, I took over the kitchen. As I've mentioned in the past, my parents raised me on mostly produce and fruit, so I have an easier base to start with. I don't have to fight with them too much to eat their veggies.

Since they are both now retired, I'm a little surprised how their nutrition seems to have reverted to more processed foods. In retirement, you'd think they'd have more time to shop and prepare foods, but it seems they have stocked up on 'convenience foods' so they have to go out less.

Today I'm making a pot roast in a crockpot. It's so easy. Just chop up onion, green peppers, carrots and celery; brown chuck roast in a pan; put in crockpot with chicken stock and turn on low for 10 hours. That's it. Easy. That's what I call convenience food. I'm hoping to remind them good food comes from ingredients, and not boxes.

My dad hasn't been eating much since the surgery, which is worrying. I'm not sure if it's an appetite loss. I was absolutely appalled by how little he was eating - I eat more food than he does! A nurse came by to check on him, and fortunately I was able to get her on my side. She said he needs to eat about 180g protein in his recovery. I'm not sure why he's been reluctant to eat. I gave him a chicken breast the other night, and he thought it was too much food. I don't know where it is coming from, but it's concerning. Protein and calories are what's needed to recover.

I bought protein shakes and bars to get his protein levels up. I'd rather he eat real food, but it's more important to do something. I checked the package labels, and bought ones that had the least sugar I could find. Not terribly easy to find.

So I guess I'm in the role of home nutritionist. Which is fine with me. I enjoy doing it, and it's keeping me busy.

My dad is doing better, but not out of the woods. The risk is pneumonia and wound infection for several more weeks. We have to try and minimize these risks. And as you know, I believe nutrition is the best medicine.

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

KWRIGHT26 9/12/2012 2:32PM

    Hmm... maybe drinking calories is the answer? If he's not dairy sensitive, a smoothie with Greek yogurt and maybe protein powder might be okay, if it isn't too hard on his stomach.



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THINRONNA 9/11/2012 3:45PM

    How wonderful that you can be there for your dad. I hope he knows how lucky he is to have you cooking for him and understanding what he needs to recover. You are so smart and such a great cook. Truly.

I hope your dad recovers quickly.
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LYNDALOVES2HIKE 9/7/2012 10:51AM

    Your parents are lucky to have you there to help out!

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KAYOTIC 9/6/2012 10:13PM

    It's really wonderful that you can be there to look after you dad so carefully, hope he starts to appreciate that protein! They do say older folks can have trouble eating enough, probably an appetite thing. Maybe the nurse or a dietician can help with suggestions?

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NEILITHICMAN 9/6/2012 5:02PM

    My parents are exactly the same. They bought us up on home prepared meals and whole foods. Now they're both almost at retirement they also eat mostly processed foods, and then complain that they're putting on weight. That will never happen to me because I love cooking. Preparing the meal is almost as rewarding as eating it.

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VHALKYRIE 9/6/2012 4:35PM

    I wouldn't recommend eating 180g all at once. ;) I weigh 127lbs and I eat about 80-100g per day. My dad is almost double my weight, so I think the nurse's numbers are about right.

He was only eating a hamburger patty and a chicken breast. That's only about 50g protein. Waaay too little. Doubling to 100g would be an improvement.

His numbers are looking excellent today. Blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, and weight are all down! And he's been eating more. We'll have to work up on the protein, but so far so good!

Comment edited on: 9/6/2012 4:40:43 PM

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WOUBBIE 9/6/2012 3:25PM

    When my dad was going through kidney failure the doctor was able to prescribe a protein shake for him that he really liked, and was lower in potassium than store brand ones (they can really get their electrolytes screwed up if they take the wrong supplements). I don't remember it being particularly expensive - might have been covered by Medicare - and it really helped him.

Keep up the good work! It's tough being the caregiver, but you do what you can.

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MYLADY4 9/6/2012 2:41PM

    Good luck and hopefully he will feel better soon and eat more.

I found that Muscle Milk has ok shakes

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NAYPOOIE 9/6/2012 2:09PM

    180g? That seems like a lot to stuff down.

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_RAMONA 9/6/2012 1:10PM

    {{{{{{{{{ HUGS }}}}}}}}

Your parents are very blessed to have you... and you are blessed that they will allow you to lead for now! You're doing a wonderful job... I can smell the love seasoning that roast all the way over here!

Your family is in my prayers!

P.S. Add some red wine to that crock pot... and make a rich sauce to go with the meat afterward... SO yummy!

Comment edited on: 9/6/2012 1:11:20 PM

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Home Nutritionist and Recovery

Thursday, September 06, 2012

When we're little, our parents are responsible for teaching us how to tie our shoes, dress ourselves, clean up our boo-boos, and how to eat. For the first decade of our lives, our parents are completely responsible for the foods we put in our bodies.

It's interesting to me how as my parents pass from middle age into senior citizens that the role has changed.

After my dad's surgery, I have pretty much taken over the kitchen. As I've mentioned in the past, my parents raised me on mostly produce and fruit, so I have an easier base to start with. I don't have to fight with them too much to eat their veggies.

Since they are both now retired, I'm a little surprised how their nutrition seems to have reverted to more processed foods. In retirement, you'd think they'd have more time to shop and prepare foods, but it seems they have stocked up on 'convenience foods' so they have to go out less.

Today I'm making a pot roast in a crockpot. It's so easy. Just chop up onion, green peppers, carrots and celery; brown chuck roast in a pan; put in crockpot with chicken stock and turn on low for 10 hours. That's it. Easy. That's what I call convenience food. I'm hoping to remind them good food comes from ingredients, and not boxes.

My dad hasn't been eating much since the surgery, which is worrying. I'm not sure if it's an appetite loss. I was absolutely appalled by how little he was eating - I eat more food than he does! A nurse came by to check on him, and fortunately I was able to get her on my side. She said he needs to eat about 180g protein in his recovery. I'm not sure why he's been reluctant to eat. I gave him a chicken breast the other night, and he thought it was too much food. I don't know where it is coming from, but it's concerning. Protein and calories are what's needed to recover.

I bought protein shakes and protein bars to get his protein levels up. I'd rather he eat real food, but it's more important to do something. I checked the package labels, and bought ones that had the least sugar I could find. Not terribly easy to find.

So I guess I'm in the role of home nutritionist. Which is fine with me. I enjoy doing it, and it's keeping me busy.

My dad is doing better, but not out of the woods. The risk is pneumonia and wound infection for several more weeks. We have to try and minimize these risks. And as you know, I believe nutrition is the best medicine.

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

LYNDALOVES2HIKE 9/7/2012 10:51AM

    I nursed my dad for 3-1/2 yrs so I know how it feels to be on 'that side' - good luck with his recovery. I hope he gets well fast!

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CATLADY52 9/6/2012 7:13PM

    Good for you, sticking to the way you were raised. emoticon
It isn't easy to turn the tables on your parents. Good luck. emoticon

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SMILINGTREE 9/6/2012 3:31PM

    It can be really difficult to feed a senior who just doesn't want to eat. We took turns preparing meals for my grandfather for about three years. He didn't like what he called "soft" or "bitter" lettuce, and got finicky when we had to begin reducing his sodium and protein intake. Like your parents, though, we were lucky that he preferred more whole foods than processed foods. I hope that you find joy in your role as home nutritionist, along the worry that you feel.

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ARCHIMEDESII 9/6/2012 3:07PM

    Processed foods are also easier to digest as well as chew.

I used to work with a woman who volunteered at a food pantry. One day, she brought in piles of bread. It was loaf after loaf of day old European style crusty bread. places like Whole Foods donate bread that's past its expiration date. Well, she brings in these loaves of bread and I asked her why didn't the pantry take them ? She said they did take quite a bit. She even takes food over to elder care facilities. However, they wouldn't take the bread because the crusty style breads are too hard for the residents to chew. that's why we got the left overs. When I visit my aunt in her retirement facility, they tend to serve softer types of food.

Also, processed foods are a quick source of calories. When my aunt had her hip surgery, the painkillers made it difficult for her to eat. Like your dad, my cousin gave her protein shakes like Ensure to keep up her strength.

Hope your dad is doing better after his surgery ! the medications do make it difficult to eat.




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ANDREAG89 9/6/2012 2:29PM

    Your feeding them good, whole foods might just help Dad recover faster. Good job focusing on feeding them right. I'm sure they're glad to have a real home-cooked meal, too!

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Health Inspiration

Tuesday, September 04, 2012

I said I probably wasn't going to write unless I got some inspiration. Wouldn't you know that I got inspiration from reading quotes? I started adding these to my previous blog, but decided they needed a blog of their own.

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“So many people spend their health gaining wealth, and then have to spend their wealth to regain their health.” ~ A.J.Materi

“If we could give every individual the right amount of nourishment and exercise, not too little and not too much, we would have found the safest way to health.” ~ Hippocrates

“Leave all the afternoon for exercise and recreation, which are as necessary as reading. I will rather say more necessary because health is worth more than learning.” ~ Thomas Jefferson

“A man’s health can be judged by which he takes two at a time – pills or stairs.” ~ Joan Welsh

“Many so-called spiritual people, they overeat, drink too much, they smoke and don’t exercise. But they do go to church every week and pray ‘Please help my arthritis. Please help me bring up my strength, make me young again.’” ~ Jack LaLanne

“It’s bizarre that the produce manager is more important to my children’s health than the pediatrician.” ~Meryl Streep

"It is health that is real wealth, and not pieces of gold and silver." ~ Gandhi

"Without health life is not life; it is only a state of langour and suffering - an image of death." ~ Buddha

“The more you eat, the less flavor; the less you eat, the more flavor.” ~ Chinese Proverb

“A man too busy to take care of his health is like a mechanic too busy to take care of his tools.” ~Spanish Proverb

“He who takes medicine and neglects to diet wastes the skill of his doctors.” ~Chinese Proverb

“As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists.” ~ Joan Gussow

“It’s not food if it arrived through the window of your car.” ~ Michael Pollan

“The doctor of the future will no longer treat the human frame with drugs, but rather will cure and prevent disease with nutrition.” ~ Thomas Edison

“Our food should be our medicine and our medicine should be our food.” ~ Hippocrates

“Our bodies are our gardens – our wills are our gardeners.” ~William Shakespeare

“True healthcare reform starts in your kitchen, not in Washington” ~Anonymous

"The greatest of follies is to sacrifice health for any other kind of happiness." ~ Arthur Schopenhauer

"Health is not valued until sickness comes." ~ Thomas Fuller

“Those who think they have not time for bodily exercise will sooner or later have to find time for illness.” ~ Edward Stanley

“Take care of your body. It’s the only place you have to live.” ~Jim Rohn

“My own prescription for health is less paperwork and more running barefoot through the grass” ~Leslie Grimutter

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

LYNDALOVES2HIKE 9/7/2012 10:49AM

    These are great - thanks for posting!!!

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NEILITHICMAN 9/5/2012 4:30PM

    I liked one of the one liners from a local comedian. "Why does it cost so much to lose weight when we can feed a starving child in africa for $1 a day"

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KAYOTIC 9/4/2012 9:56PM

    Great list of quotes, you were inspired! Take care, sorry to hear about your boss and your dad, that's a lot going on in such a short time... emoticon

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_RAMONA 9/4/2012 1:22PM

    My favourite:

"A man’s health can be judged by which he takes two at a time – pills or stairs." ~ Joan Welsh

Stay strong!

(Have your parents turned their kitchen over to you?)
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WOUBBIE 9/4/2012 12:36PM

    “True healthcare reform starts in your kitchen, not in Washington” ~Anonymous

Cheaper insurance alone can't make your type 2 disappear...

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SAINTBETH 9/4/2012 11:09AM

    so true

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DOBSONSM 9/4/2012 10:32AM

    emoticon

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On Hiatus

Tuesday, September 04, 2012

Just wanted to let you all know that I am going to be on an extended hiatus for a while. My former boss died of complications from diabetes two weeks ago, and my dad got appendicitis last week. Because of his age and weight, there were complications. As you can imagine, it's sapping my enthusiasm to be upbeat and write. I'm back home to help my mom with his recovery. I might post a blog here or there if I can muster some inspiration.

If there's any commentary that I can make from these circumstances is how important it is to get weight and health under control. Excessive weight, in the unfortunate case where you might need surgery, makes the surgeons' work harder. And makes your recovery longer, and more fraught with variables.

Exercise, eat good quality produce and protein, and eat as little sugar as possible. Don't say you don't have time, or that it's too expensive. Disease and hospital stays will rob you of quality of life and wealth. Pay now or pay later. It's your choice. That's my recommendation.

Take care, and Spark well.

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

LYNDALOVES2HIKE 9/7/2012 10:48AM

    Sounds like you're dealing with a lot right now - take care!!
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GETSTRONGRRR 9/4/2012 8:20PM

    Very sorry to hear about both your boss and dad.

You've got the right attitude though, and you know enough to really help out your mom....from the way you described your relationship back when the wildfires were going, sounds like you're the family bedrock

take care, check in here when you can, and consider us your island getaway when things feel overwhelming with the familia!

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ALEXSGIRL1 9/4/2012 8:00PM

    sorry for your losses. just an idea since you love it so it may be beneficial to you to write a little every day I mean you dont have to post them .writing down your troubles etc can help you heal faster . I will pray for yours and your bosses family emoticon

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FATBASTICH 9/4/2012 7:46PM

    Hang in there.

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_RAMONA 9/4/2012 1:18PM

    Well said. You, and all of those you care about (especially your mom and dad) will be in my prayers!

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WOUBBIE 9/4/2012 11:05AM

    Be strong. I pray your Dad recuperates fully and takes his wise daughter's help and advice.

Truly, I don't think I had ever considered much how much riskier even routine procedures are for obese people until I started reading blogs here on SP. How many times have I read about someone having to remain in pain and discomfort for weeks, months, years even until they've lost enough fat to be safely operated on.

I've been truly blessed to not have needed much in the way of surgery in my life so far, but I realize I've been walking a very dangerous line. All the more reason to persevere.

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MYLADY4 9/4/2012 10:25AM

    Oh, take care. Hope your dad get's better. I know you have been trying to help him with his health. emoticon

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Chicken a Day Keeps the Doctor Away

Monday, August 27, 2012

My husband and I feel fortunate we were raised by parents who fed us whole, complete, unprocessed foods growing up, so it's not a hard stretch for us to eat the same way. Our parents were blue collar, and so we ate fresh produce and meat because we were of modest means.

That's right. We didn't eat a lot of processed foods, fast foods, and chain restaurants because we couldn't afford it. I absolutely bristle at the perception that eating fresh produce and meats are expensive.

Case in point. A KFC thigh and leg combo with cornbread, coleslaw, and a medium diet Coke costs about $8 in my area. Last night I roasted a free-range organic chicken that we ate with a medley of carrots, celery, onions and bell pepper. We ate a thigh and leg each. My chicken cost $12, which is twice the price of a battery cage conventional chicken. At first glance, it seems extravagant. But this chicken will give us about 5 meals this week, making each serving cost about $2.40. My veggies were mostly organic, and add about another $1 at most. That's $3.40 per dinner plate. Add in my $2.50 glass of wine from my $5 bottle and we're up to $5.90.

My organic chicken cost $2.29/lb. That's still considerably less than many of the cheapest cuts of beef.

Costs less than KFC, fewer calories, and more nutrition. This is a win by any diet paradigm.

Oh yeah. And about that glass of wine. My attempt at going cold turkey? Haha, yeah that didn't work out so well! I managed to cut back to every other day, and it had the desired effect of rebooting fat loss. I'm trying to slightly reduce quantity. I'm also going to try making sure I have my last glass with my dinner, and not have one too near my bedtime.

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The weight loss is going slow, no matter what, though. I'm already at normal bodyfat %, and I have less than 7lbs until goal weight. My body is more resistant to losing fat at this level. I believe it can be done, I just haven't figured out the magic combo. Once I do, I'll be sure to let you know!

My husband and I both went to our doctors last week for general health checkups. Two years ago, my blood pressure was 135/86. Borderline high blood pressure. 140/90 is considered elevated blood pressure.

My blood pressure last Monday was 120/70, a statistically significant improvement. My new doctor seemed surprised I was on zero medications. No allergies, no major health concerns. He said it was refreshing to have a patient in good health. I go in next week to get my blood lipids checked. Given my improvement in blood pressure, I'm expecting the rest of my panel to also improve. I'll have to see if I can find my numbers from two years ago to compare.

My signout sheet said he talked to me about a low cholesterol, low fat diet. I laughed. Actually, we talked about my wine drinking. He agreed that a glass of wine a night is beneficial, just don't overdo it. I'm not sure if he assumed that my health was due to a low cholesterol, low fat diet, or if that is just what he's told to write from the ADA. I certainly didn't tell him about my eating 3 eggs per day, chicken skin, real butter, coconut oil, 2 avocados per week, and eschewing 'heart health' grains. Since he's new, I haven't built a rapport with him yet to discuss some of my more controversial habits.

I definitely proved to myself that my dietary changes was causative in general health improvement. One year on a low grain diet did for me what 5 years on a low fat diet did not - reduced my risk for metabolic syndrome. It works, and I see no reason to change.

I live in the deep south, which is disproportionately obese. When we moved here, I worried about gaining weight. Instead, I lost weight. Yes, my grocery bill might initially look higher than the person behind me with a cart full of whole wheat bread and Fiber One cereal. But here's what I'm not spending my money on: weekly/monthly doctor visits and pharmaceuticals. My doc says if my lipids check out ok, I don't need to come back until another year. Organic chicken and eggs are a far better tasting pill.

My husband's blood pressure reading wasn't bad, but not great. He seemed surprised mine was lower than his. He has some bad eating habits, so I was relieved his number wasn't higher. However, his doctor told him he is 'obese' and needs to lose weight. He's still wary of the fat I eat, but he is considerably more open to the 'less grain' mantra I've been evangelizing.

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

SALONKITTY 8/30/2012 7:20AM

    My sisters and I grew up eating whole veggies and meats as we lived in the country, had a huge garden, chickens, etc. The local meatpacking place was just down the road, and my mom bought raw milk and butter from a little old couple up the road. The milk came in those great big pickle jars with about 4 or 5 inches of cream floating on top.

Here in Scotland, food is really expensive. A whole organic free range chicken is around £8. That's a lot of dollars! I have to buy things on offer. I was pretty excited to score a kilo of wild salmon for £16, down from £24 something. That said, no food is really cheap here, so we bite the bullet and pay. Don't really have much choice.

Great news re: the results of your doctor's visit. Congratulations!




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ARCHIMEDESII 8/28/2012 3:49PM

    Glad to hear you got a clean bill of health from your doctor.

I'll tell ya, I'm shocked at how expensive fast food can be. During my "eating" days, I wouldn't think twice about having a 4 piece KFC meal (with sides) for dinner. At the time (back in the Dark Ages), that meal cost around $4.99. Today, that same 4 piece meal is around $9+ !!! For that kind of money, I can go to a nice restaurant and enjoy a real meal.

Sure, McDonalds and Taco Bell have those dollar specials. But on the whole, their prices on their regular items really IS outrageous. I just don't see how people can afford to eat at these places on a regular basis.

I know I need to get my yearly physical. I'm sure my blood pressure is going to be through the roof in spite of my recent weight loss. stress stinks.




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EGALITAIRE 8/28/2012 11:35AM

    Like any purchases you can pay different prices for the same items. Our food expense initially went up when we started eating Primal, but since it has steadily gone down as we have learned to shop smarter. Weekly meal planning is not a panacea, but has been most helpful, along with batch cooking.

We are back to spending about the same on food as we did pre-primal, admittedly that includes eating out, which we do less of cause we enjoy our own cooking.

It really is a lifestyle change, which starts with a mindset change.

Stay Strong

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VHALKYRIE 8/28/2012 11:15AM

    BLUEKITTYGP12: Organic definitely isn't cheaper in the south! I don't want to give that impression! I buy in bulk from Costco.

FITGIRL15: I've fallen out of love with Western Medicine, too.

JUSTBIRDY: I don't believe the bp drop is simply due to the weight loss, either. My husband and I eat the same dinners because that's the only meal we eat together, yet his numbers and weight are higher. He eats sandwiches with big bread loaves for lunch; I eat egg or tuna salad in lettuce wraps. The differences in what we eat for the other two meals in the day makes a difference.

More comments later. :)

Comment edited on: 8/28/2012 11:16:18 AM

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JUSTBIRDY 8/28/2012 11:01AM

    I go even cheaper since I have found a store that sells lots of organic chicken, so they have quick sales, and that is when I snap it up. We had real food out of necessity too, but my dad was a farmer in the early years and he continued to try to grow lots of what we ate. My bp was inching up, too, and then it went down when I went lower carb and lost the weight, but contrary to "some" "experts", my decrease in bp wasn't due to weight loss alone. I have experienced continual improvements in my bp, despite having lost the bulk of my weight almost two years ago.
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FITGIRL15 8/28/2012 8:27AM

    Finding what works for you is the key! The newest "trend", low fat (or whatever!!!) diet won't always work for your body type! You know this... so who cares what the doctor thinks! You know yourself much better then he can ever know you!!! (How can you tell I've fallen out of love with Western Medicine? lol)

Good Job, Girl! Keep it up!

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BLUEKITTYJAN 8/28/2012 4:19AM

    Wow Organic foods are a lot cheaper in the South. An organic chicken here in Oregon runs about $3.99. I would like to eat organic food but I feed a family of adults on very little income. I guess will die young and be well preserved before they embalm us.

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LYNDALOVES2HIKE 8/28/2012 12:10AM

    Wow, you're doing great! Congrats!
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GETSTRONGRRR 8/27/2012 9:01PM

    Congrats on all the great numbers! Fantastic progress.

Yeah, I think the same way about the economics of eating well. In the end, I just ask myself this simple question, "If someone told me I could lose weight and be healthy for$50/month, would I pay it?"

Hell ya! I have paid more for less beneficial crap. I think $50 is about the difference in our grocery bill. Getting quality products & ingredients has been so much better....organic eggs, real butter, real salmon......better health = priceless!

I recently saw my first quantifiable measure of success going low carb by taking a Bodpod bodyfat measurement last week....down to 23%. Next step, lipids & blood work in Oct/Nov when I get the annual physical.....looking good so far!

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-LINDA_S 8/27/2012 8:13PM

    Mmmm...roast chicken sounds great. Especially some crispy skin. Soon I'll be able to have it again! Good job with the numbers!

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CATLADY52 8/27/2012 5:42PM

    emoticon on the checkup. Since it was your first visit to this Doctor you were wise to not tell him about your diet just yet. That can come the next time you see him. emoticon

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HIKETOHEIGHTS 8/27/2012 5:35PM

    I would rather eat your way any day of the week. Congratulations on The doc visit!!! I like the way you think. I have watched all of the games of throne, I see you are a fan. Who is your favorite character?

Comment edited on: 8/27/2012 5:38:23 PM

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NEILITHICMAN 8/27/2012 4:29PM

    Chicken? Pah....I'll be dining out on Venison for a while, my cousin managed to get 3 deer while he was out hunting in the weekend so we've got a freezer and refrigerator full of venison at the moment.

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THINRONNA 8/27/2012 4:28PM

    Great blog! I am so happy for you that your Dr.'s visit went so well! You do eat healthy my dear...no matter what anyone who doesn't understand might say. You do your research and you know your stuff! I like that you eat organic. I would do it more but not having a car I am somewhat stuck with my local grocery store. In Norway not many grocery stores carry organic and when they do it is sad looking stuff because it is not mainstream to eat that way. With regards to chickens, I cannot even get a whole chicken at my grocery. I do know where to get them and sometimes do go to where I can get better products but it is a train ride away so it is not often enough! You keep it up! Keep reminding me that it is out there. I love your descriptions of your meals and the success that you have been having! You go!

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MRS.CARLY 8/27/2012 2:47PM

    Good news from the Doctor!

yes, chicken and veggies is a MUCH better tasting pill to swallow

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MYOWNHERO 8/27/2012 2:22PM

    Bravo! I completely agree about those wonderful grass-fed eggs and meats. I feel the difference.

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TRIANGLE-WOMAN 8/27/2012 11:41AM

    Fantastic!

re: I believe it can be done, I just haven't figured out the magic combo. Once I do, I'll be sure to let you know!

Please do!! I'm waiting.....

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EGALITAIRE 8/27/2012 11:25AM

    emoticon

Comment edited on: 8/27/2012 11:27:21 AM

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SEPPIESUSAN 8/27/2012 11:24AM

    Blood pressure can be kind of variable and can go up when you're nervous - which you may be when you're at the doctor's office! Last time I went to the doctor my blood pressure was scary high which surprised me because I'd never had a problem with it before, but I'd had a lot to drink the night before and walked a few miles to the doctor's office in the morning. A day or two later I measured it myself on my parents' digital blood pressure machine, and it was back to its normal 115ish over 70ish or so. Just saying...maybe your husband was just nervous, or dehydrated, or something.

Congrats on your good numbers, though, and keep doing what you're doing because it's working!

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ALICIA214 8/27/2012 11:22AM

 

We grew up eating fresh fruit and veggies we also raised chickens so we had fresh eggs. my Grandmother and Mother were both terrific cooks so
our meals were wholesome and delicious. Never knew what fast food and soda was so I have never developed an addiction to either one.
I love your breakdown cost wise of your meals.Keep up the good work.

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TONYVAND1 8/27/2012 11:21AM

  emoticonI love eggs and chicken as well. Keep at it.

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EGALITAIRE 8/27/2012 11:20AM

    I love the response - what medications are you on - "organic chicken and eggs"

The food cost calculations are a good reference as well. I have two teenaged boys - we have always eaten mostly at home - very little take-out, except when we are on a road trip, which we do frequently as they both play travel sports.

Since adopting a Primal lifestyle we now take snacks and meals with us. The bill would be $30+ every time we stopped at McD's or similar, which was often twice per trip - outbound and homeward bound.

Now I pack snacks and meals and that I make for under $20 per direction. So instead of a Saturday hockey trip costing $60+ in food (if you are still calling that stuff food), we spend under $40 and eat great fresh primal foods. Both my wallet and all of our bodies are healthier.

Congrats on the progress - looks like DH might have some impetus to continue to adapt his diet as well.

Comment edited on: 8/27/2012 11:25:27 AM

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TBARBOUR0322 8/27/2012 11:08AM

    You've made great progress.

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