TXHRT4U   50,071
SparkPoints
50,000-59,999 SparkPoints
 
 
TXHRT4U's Recent Blog Entries

Fitness Tip#280 - December 28th, 2012

Friday, December 28, 2012

Muscle "Tone" is Misleading

Sorry, muscle "tone" is one of the most misleading concepts in fitness. Most people are familiar with this idea: Train high reps for "muscle tone." Only problem? High reps oftentimes won't make your muscles look more toned. It'll do the opposite.

In reality, there are two types of "tone": neurogenic and myogenic. That's a lot of jargon that fitness and science nerds tend to care about. What it means: You want myogenic tone, but that happens best with heavier weights at lower reps. That's exactly why women should be lifting weights--and not just the tiny ones.
Does this mean you can't get "toned" without lifting heavy? Of course not. Plenty of women have shown that this can happen with higher reps. But many more have proven that you'll get the lean look you want--FASTER--by using heavier weights. Push the intensity--whether you're a man or woman--and you'll be surprised how quickly your body will change in the way you want.

Have a GREAT weekend SPARKERS!!!!!!!!


emoticon

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

RUN4FOOD 12/28/2012 8:51PM

    One of my goals for 2013, mostly due to your blogs, is to lift heavier weights with fewer reps.
Thanks.
emoticon

Report Inappropriate Comment


Fitness Tip#279 - December 27th, 2012

Thursday, December 27, 2012

Reps and Sets are Misleading

I highly suggest that everyone read this great article by Jon Goodman

www.livestrong.com/article/557115-tr
aining-101-the-ultimate-guide-to-sets-
and-reps/


In it, you'll learn (if you didn't know it already) the prototypical recipe for building muscle, adding strength, or losing fat. But as Goodman points out, the rules of reps and sets are not written in stone. And oftentimes, the best thing you can do is to break the rules and train in a different rep range than what is typically prescribed. There are personality variables that can impact the results that you experience. And there's also another little known fact...


emoticon

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

ANDY_54 12/28/2012 6:47AM

    Among other things, this sttod out from the article: 'evolve your thinking'. Wise words. Too often I get in an exercise rut and for various reasons have a hard time getting out of it. Great article on something I need to shake up a bit: my strength workout. Thanks!

Report Inappropriate Comment
RUN4FOOD 12/27/2012 8:30PM

    Thanks for fixing the link.
I'm a counter.
Think I should change this?

Report Inappropriate Comment
TXHRT4U 12/27/2012 7:29PM

    link fixed emoticon

Report Inappropriate Comment
RUN4FOOD 12/27/2012 5:43PM

    Tried the link, it didn't work.

Report Inappropriate Comment


Fitness Tip#278 - December 26th, 2012

Wednesday, December 26, 2012

Wind Resistance: Even in ideal outdoor conditions you run against air resistance; you don't get inside, so the paces you run on a treadmill are a bit easier than they would be outside. To negate this, you can put the treadmill incline up to 1.5 percent to account for lost wind resistance and make the paces comparable to those run outdoors.

With these key elements in mind, you can adapt your training as need be. If you're doing much of your running indoors, make sure to supplement with extra hamstring-strengthening exercises.

To safeguard your ankles, work on balance and mobility drills such as balancing on one leg on a Bosu ball or pillow. After you can hold there, test your balance further by moving your arms or reaching down with your opposite arm towards the foot you are balancing on. This will build strength in the ankle area.

emoticon

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

PLANTAGO 12/28/2012 11:54AM

    This is true. I do exercises on the balance board and they work great for my injured foot and weak knees.

Report Inappropriate Comment
RUN4FOOD 12/26/2012 9:59PM

    I never liked running on the treadmill. I love the scenery changes while running outside. My mind doesn't get bored outside like it does when I run on a treadmill.

Report Inappropriate Comment


Fitness Tip#277 - December 25th, 2012

Wednesday, December 26, 2012

Indoor Versus Outdoor Running: The Differences (Part 2 of 3)


Terrain: Or more correctly, the lack thereof. Something that I try and keep in mind is that the treadmill is really consistent and even, but outside things are constantly changing. Each change takes energy and thought, so I remind myself not to zone out while outside and especially on trails, where a bad footfall can mean stitches and a new tooth. Outside of a potential fall due to unsteady outdoor footing, landing wrong on your foot can cause strains and other injuries. If you've been doing much of your running on a treadmill, your body is used to a nearly even and constant stride. Should you run outside, your risk of an injury from even a minor misstep would be higher because the small muscles, tendons and ligaments of your ankle haven't been forced to get used to a variety of landings. (i.e.: sharp turns, curbs, uneven pavement, trails, etc.)

This will probably be my main issue next month.

MERRY CHRISTMAS!!!

emoticon

  
  Member Comments About This Blog Post:

ANDY_54 12/27/2012 10:05AM

    Greta piece and a reminder as well. I run the majority of my time on the 'mill due to various knee injuries over the course of life. I want to transition to outside soon (well, as soon as the snow melts a bit) because I want to enter into a few races...so thanks...will need to take it slow and get accustomed.

Report Inappropriate Comment
ALFA_SUNSHINE 12/26/2012 8:30PM

    Christmas blessings and peace to you and yours emoticon ~hugs~

Report Inappropriate Comment


Fitness Tip#276 - December 24th, 2012

Wednesday, December 26, 2012

Indoor Versus Outdoor Running: The Differences (1 of 3)


While there are treadmill benefits to boast of, there are still key differences runners need to be aware of between indoor and outdoor running.


Hamstrings: Because a machine powers the treadmill belt, the mechanics of your running stride differ when you run outside. When running on the treadmill, you use your quads to push off. But, unlike outdoor running, where you would typically rely on your hamstrings to finish the stride cycle and lift your leg behind you, the propulsion of the belt does much of that work for you. This means your hamstrings aren't firing as much and don't get worked running inside as they would outside. The extra effort demanded of your quads is also a factor to keep in mind.

Have a MERRY CHRISTMAS!!!!!

emoticon

  


First Page  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 Last Page